Privacy desires ignored

For psychiatrist Deborah Peel, maybe patient privacy and patient consent aren’t identical twins, but they’re sure close relatives.

Not surprisingly, a recent Zogby International poll commissioned by Peel’s not-for-profit Patient Privacy Rights Foundation, Austin, Texas, focuses on patient consent and its relationship to privacy—a unity the federal government has chosen to either ignore or deny.

The 2,000 adult poll respondents reached by Zogby via the Internet put great store in their right to privacy. They cling to the quaint notion that they should be asked before their electronic health records are sent skittering off to unknown users for unknown purposes. See full poll results here.

Silly them.

HHS rulemakers wrote away a key right to privacy eight years ago.

An HHS revision to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act privacy rule in 2002 stripped away one of the broader authorities giving patients the right to control the flow of their medical information. HHS rulemakers did it by eliminating the right of consent. They took a stringent privacy protection rule and transformed it into a disclosure rule.

There are a lot of bright folks who have warned HHS that this privacy issue broadly—and this HIPAA privacy rule revision, specifically—are going to explode on the healthcare industry. One of the more insistent voices has been Peel’s, but she by no means alone.

Majority of Americans want personal control of health information

It’s hard to get Americans to agree on much these days, but overwhelming majorities seem to want control over their own electronic health information.

A poll from Dr. Deborah Peel’s Patient Privacy Rights Foundation and Zogby International found that 97 percent of the more than 2,000 U.S. adults surveyed believe that hospitals, physicians, laboratories and IT vendors should not be allowed to sell or share “sensitive health information” without consent. Ninety-eight percent are opposed to health insurance companies marketing personal health information, according to the survey.

See full poll results here.

Americans Want to Control Their Health Information

Health privacy watchdog Patient Privacy Rights and Zogby International surveyed 2,000 people, and found that almost all object to doctors, hospitals, and insurance companies sharing or selling their information without their consent. An overwhelming majority also wants to decide not only which companies and government agencies can access their electronic health records, but which individuals.

See the Survey Results

Hospitals and doctors are currently busy implementing the first stage of requirements under the HITECH Act, which calls for providing patients within the next two years with an electronic copy of their physical, test results, and medications. Ultimately, patients should be able to access their electronic health record online.

Poll: Huge majorities want control over health info

AUSTIN, TX – Patient Privacy Rights, the health privacy watchdog, has enlisted the help of Zogby International to conduct an online survey of more than 2,000 adults to identify their views on privacy, access to health information, and healthcare IT. The results were overwhelmingly in favor of individual choice and control over personal health information.

View the full poll results here.

Ninety-seven percent of Americans believe that doctors, hospitals, labs and health technology systems should not be allowed to share or sell their sensitive health information without consent.

The poll also found strong opposition to insurance companies gaining access to electronic health records without permission. Ninety-eight percent of respondents opposed payers sharing or selling health information without consent.

“No matter how you look at it, Americans want to control their own private health information,” said Deborah Peel, MD, founder of Patient Privacy Rights. “We asked the question, ‘If you have health records in electronic systems, do YOU want to decide which companies and government agencies can see and use your sensitive data?’ Ninety-three percent said ‘Yes!'”…

…The group advocates a ‘one-stop shop’ website where consumers can set up consent directives or rules to guide the use and disclosure of all or part of their electronic health information; if a request to use or sell health data is not covered by privacy rules, they can be ‘pinged’ via cell phone or e-mailed for informed consent.

Patient Privacy Rights calls this solution the “Do Not Disclose” list – similar to the national “Do Not Call” list. If a patient’s name is on the list, any organization that holds his or her sensitive health information, from prescriptions to DNA, must first explain how that information will be used before being granted permission.