Kaiser Had Malware on Server for 2.5 Years

By Joseph Goedert | April 8, 2014 | HealthData Management

The Northern California division of Kaiser Permanente is notifying about 5,100 patients that protected health information was on a server found in February 2014 to be infected with malicious software.

In a letter to patients, the organization says it believes the server was infected in October 2011. Kaiser removed the server–used to store research data–and confirmed other servers were not affected and appropriately secured. “We currently have no information that any unauthorized person accessed the information on the server,” according to the patient letter. “However, the malicious software broke down the server’s security barriers so we are investigating and responding with a very high level of caution and concern. We are very sorry that this happened.”

Information on the server included patient name, date of birth and gender, and also may have included address, race-ethnicity, medical record number, lab results associated with research, and patient responses to questions related to research studies in which they participated. Social Security numbers and data from Kaiser’s electronic health record were not held on the server.

(See also: Top 6 Threats to Enterprise Security)

The new breach soon will be listed on the HHS Office for Civil Rights’ website of major security breaches affecting 500 or more individuals, and it will be Kaiser’s fourth posting on the site.

In late 2013, a missing flash drive from the nuclear medicine department at Anaheim Medical Center resulted in notifications sent to about 49,000 patients. Also in 2013, Kaiser notified 647 patients after learning of unauthorized access/disclosure of the EHR. In late 2009, the organization notified about 15,500 patients following the theft of an electronic portal device.

 

 

 

Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many

To view the full article, please visit Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many.

Steve Lohr likens today’s Big Data issues to the introduction of the mainframe computer in the 1960s. Even then, new technology threatened the “common notions of privacy”.

A few key quotes from the article:

“…the latest leaps in data collection are raising new concern about infringements on privacy — an issue so crucial that it could trump all others and upset the Big Data bandwagon. Dr. Pentland is a champion of the Big Data vision and believes the future will be a data-driven society. Yet the surveillance possibilities of the technology, he acknowledges, could leave George Orwell in the dust.”

“The World Economic Forum published a report late last month that offered one path — one that leans heavily on technology to protect privacy. The report grew out of a series of workshops on privacy held over the last year, sponsored by the forum and attended by government officials and privacy advocates, as well as business executives. The corporate members, more than others, shaped the final document.”