Mostashari mindful of HIT stakeholder tension

WASHINGTON – At the Health IT Policy Committee meeting Wednesday morning, Farzad Mostashari, MD, the new national coordinator for health information technology, said he will listen attentively to stakeholder interests and is aware of the tensions among them. However, his first objective will be the public interest.

In addition to his national coordinator role, Mostashari will serve as chair of the HIT Policy Committee, an advisory group to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), which meets once amonth. Like his predecessor, David Blumenthal, MD, his leadership of this committee, in particular, will provide a catalyst for much of the activity the government plans for health IT.

“David is a tough act to follow,” Mostashari said, in some of his first public comments following his appointment last Friday. He added that Blumenthal had a broad range of support and unique skills that helped to move the federal HIT agenda to the next level.

“I’m not David Blumenthal, but I will do my best and will continue down the path he has set,” Mostashari said.

Health IT group drafts privacy recommendations

A federally chartered advisory work group charged in June with devising recommendations on privacy and security policies to support the government’s electronic health-record system subsidy program presented today its near-final list of guidelines to the Health Information Technology Policy Committee.

The work group, known as the privacy and security tiger team, met Monday and released what amounts to a consensus report on its recommendations, said Deven McGraw, co-chair of the tiger team and director of the Health Privacy Project at the Center for Democracy and Technology, a Washington think tank. The Health IT Policy Committee advises the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at HHS…

According to the tiger team’s draft document posted on the HIT Policy Committee’s website, the team’s recommendations are based on “fair information practices,” a now globally accepted set of privacy policy guidelines that stems from a 1973 report by the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare.

“All entities involved in health information exchange—including providers and third-party service providers like Health Information Organizations (HIOs) and intermediaries—follow the full complement of fair information practices when handling personally identifiable health information,” according to the tiger team proposal.