CommonWell Is a Shame and a Missed Opportunity

This is a story about how major data holders are moving to consolidate THEIR control over the collection and use of our personal health information.

Instead of building electronic health systems that enable us to decide who can see and use our health data, we are locked out and have no way to know who is using our data or what it’s used for.

-Deborah Peel

From The Health Care Blog article: CommonWell Is a Shame and a Missed Opportunity

“The big news at HIMSS13 was the unveiling of CommonWell (Cerner, McKesson, Allscripts, athenahealth, Greenway and RelayHealth) to “get the ball rolling” on data exchange across disparate technologies. The shame is that another program with opaque governance by the largest incumbents in health IT is being passed off as progress. The missed opportunity is to answer the call for patient engagement and the frustrations of physicians with EHRs and reverse the institutional control over the physician-patient relationship. Physicians take an oath to put their patient’s interest above all others while in reality we are manipulated to participate in massive amounts of unwarranted care.

There’s a link between healthcare costs and health IT. The past months have seen frustration with this manipulation by industry hit the public media like never before. Early this year, National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Farzad Mostashari, MD, called for “moral and right” action on the part of some EHR vendors, particularly when it comes to data lock-in and pricing transparency. On February 19, a front page article in the New York Times exposed the tactics of some of the founding members of CommonWell in grabbing much of the $19 Billion of health IT incentives while consolidating the industry and locking out startups and innovators. That same week, Time magazine’s cover story is a special report on health care costs and analyzes how the US wastes $750 Billion a year and what that means to patients. To round things out, the March issue of Health Affairs, published a survey showing that “the average physician would lose $43,743 over five years” as a result of EHR adoption while the financial benefits go to the vendors and the larger institutions…”

Mostashari mindful of HIT stakeholder tension

WASHINGTON – At the Health IT Policy Committee meeting Wednesday morning, Farzad Mostashari, MD, the new national coordinator for health information technology, said he will listen attentively to stakeholder interests and is aware of the tensions among them. However, his first objective will be the public interest.

In addition to his national coordinator role, Mostashari will serve as chair of the HIT Policy Committee, an advisory group to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), which meets once amonth. Like his predecessor, David Blumenthal, MD, his leadership of this committee, in particular, will provide a catalyst for much of the activity the government plans for health IT.

“David is a tough act to follow,” Mostashari said, in some of his first public comments following his appointment last Friday. He added that Blumenthal had a broad range of support and unique skills that helped to move the federal HIT agenda to the next level.

“I’m not David Blumenthal, but I will do my best and will continue down the path he has set,” Mostashari said.