Patient Privacy Rights hires CTO

From the article and Q&A by Diana Manos in Health Care IT News: Patient Privacy Rights hires CTO

“Patient Privacy Rights appointed Adrian Gropper, MD as its first chief technology officer. Gropper is an expert in the regulated medical device field, an experienced medical informatics executive, and he has a long record of contributing to the development of state and national health information standards, according to a PPR news release.

Gropper, who has worked with federal initiatives and the Markle Foundation to help create the Direct Project’s secure email system and Blue Button technologies says he joins PPR because the challenges of runaway costs and deep inequities in the U.S. health system call for new information tools and inspired regulation.

“PPR’s deep respect for the medical profession and our total dedication to the patient perspective form the foundation for a series of policy and practice initiatives to shape health reform and electronic health systems,” Gropper said in the news release. “As a member of the PPR team, I look forward to driving a national consensus on the most difficult issues in the information age, including respectful patient identity, trustworthy consent, research acceleration, and effective public health.”

According to PPR, Gropper is a pioneer in privacy-preserving health information technology going as far back as the Guardian Angel Project at MIT in 1994. As CTO of one of the earliest personal health records companies, MedCommons, he actively participated in most of the PHR policy and standards initiatives of the past decade.”

See the full Q&A
See PPR’s Press Release

Re: Pres. Obama appoints Todd Park nation’s CTO

The new US Chief Technical Officer (CTO) was chosen for using “innovative technologies to modernize government, reduce waste and make government information more accessible to the public.”

What role does the CTO have in protecting individuals from technology harms? Whose role is it to protect the public from damaging technologies and “big data”?

Technology could enable break-through health research and improve the quality of healthcare. But we won’t have complete and accurate health data needed for transformative research when millions don’t trust electronic health systems. The 35-40% of the public who are “health privacy intense” realize US law doesn’t adequately protect their rights to health privacy.

The full article by Bernie Monegain in Healthcare IT News: President Obama appoints Todd Park Nation’s CTO