HIStalk News 3/22/13 – Quotes Dr. Deborah Peel on new CVS policy

To view the full article, please visit HIStalk News 3/22/13.

Key quote from the article:

“Patient Privacy Rights Founder Deborah Peel, MD calls a new CVS employee policy that charges employees who decline obesity checks $50 per month “incredibly coercive and invasive.” CVS covers the cost of an assessment of height, weight, body fat, blood pressure, and serum glucose and lipid levels, but also reserves the right to send the results to a health management firm even though CVS management won’t have access to the results directly. Peel says a lack of chain of custody requirements means that CVS could review the information and use it to make personnel decisions.”

CVS requiring employees to undergo weight, health assessment

To view the full article, please visit CVS requiring employees to undergo weight, health assessment.

Key quotes from the article:

“This is an incredibly coercive and invasive thing to ask employees to do,” Patient Privacy Rights founder Deborah Peel told the Boston Herald, noting that such policies are becoming more prevalent as health costs increase.

“Rising health care costs are killing the economy, and businesses are terrified,” she continued to the Herald. “Now, we’re all in this terrible situation where employers are desperate to get rid of workers who have costly health conditions, like obesity and diabetes.”

“While patient-privacy activists have cried foul, Michael DeAngelis, a CVS spokesman, explained that the goal is health.”

To learn more about the issue, please visit our Health Privacy Summit Website and register for the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy.

CVS imposes health penalty if workers’ body weight is not reported or they don’t quit smoking

To view the full article, please visit CVS imposes health penalty if workers’ body weight is not reported or they don’t quit smoking.

CVS has instated a very invasive new policy of charging workers a hefty $600 dollar a year fine if they do not disclose sensitive health information to the company’s benefits firm. According to the article, “Under the new policy, nearly 200,000 CVS employees who obtain health insurance through the company will have to report their weight, blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol to WebMD Health Services Group, which provides benefits support to CVS.” However, if employees refuse, they will be charged an extra $50 a month in health insurance costs.

Patient Privacy Rights’ Dr. Deborah Peel tells the public, “‘This is an incredibly coercive and invasive thing to ask employees to do,’…’Rising healthcare costs are killing the economy, and businesses are terrified, Now, we’re all in this terrible situation where employers are desperate to get rid of workers who have costly health conditions, like obesity and diabetes.’”

To learn more about this issue, please visit our Health Privacy Summit Website and register for the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy.

Dr. Peel on Good Morning America

Dr. Peel was interviewed for Steve Osunsami’s report on the CVS policy requiring employees to report personal health information or pay $50 more per month for coverage. The story appeared on Good Morning America on Wednesday, March 20, 2013.

Watch the video below (uses iFrame). If you can’t see it below, you can check it out on ABCNews.com here.

CVS Presses Workers for Medical Information

Christine McConville with the Boston Herald interviewed Dr. Peel for a recent story on “a new CVS policy that requires workers who use company health insurance to report their weight, and body fat and glucose levels to the insurer — or pay a $600-a-year penalty.”

From the Boston Herald Article “CVS presses workers for medical information”:

“This is an incredibly coercive and invasive thing to ask employees to do,” said Patient Privacy Rights founder Dr. Deborah Peel, adding that mounting health care costs have made these policies increasingly common.

“Rising health care costs are killing the economy, and businesses are terrified,” Peel added. “Now, we’re all in this terrible situation where employers are desperate to get rid of workers who have costly health conditions, like obesity and diabetes.”

Re: PNAS study on predicting human behavior using digital records

Picture a box with 2,000 or 10,000 puzzle pieces inside—any one puzzle piece reveals nothing about the picture. But when all the pieces are assembled, an incredibly detailed picture FULL of information is created.

The data mining industry—including Google, Facebook, Acxiom and thousands more unknown corporations and foreign businesses—assembles the puzzle of who we are from thousands of bits of data we leave online. They know FAR MORE than anyone on Earth knows about each of us—more than what our partners, our moms and dads, our best friends, our psychoanalysts, or our children know about us.

The UK study shows how easy it is for hidden data mining companies to intimately know us (and sell) WHO WE ARE.

Most Americans are not aware of the ‘surveillance economy’ or that data miners can easily collect intimate psychological and physical/health profiles of everyone from online data.

The study:

  • “demonstrates the degree to which relatively basic digital records of human behavior can be used to automatically and accurately estimate a wide range of personal attributes that people would typically assume to be private”
  • “is based on Facebook Likes, a mechanism used by Facebook users to express their positive association with (or “Like”) online content, such as photos, friends’ status updates, Facebook pages of products, sports, musicians, books, restaurants, or popular Web sites”
  • correctly discriminates between:
    • homosexual and heterosexual men in 88% of cases
    • African Americans and Caucasian Americans in 95% of cases
    • between Democrat and Republican in 85% of cases
    • For the personality trait “Openness,” prediction accuracy is close to the test–retest accuracy of a standard personality test

The “surveillance economy” is why the US needs FAR STRONGER LAWS at the very least to prevent the hidden collection, use, and sale of health data, including everything about our minds and bodies, unless we give meaningful informed consent.

This urgent topic, ie whether the US should adopt strong data privacy and security protections like the EU—will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy June 5-6 in DC (it’s free to attend and will also be live-streamed). Register at: www.healthprivacysummit.org

Re: Celebrity Credit Reports and more, hacked

Multiple celebrities have had their personal information hacked and posted online recently, and this is nothing new. We’ve seen breaches of health information of celebrities in the past, and this will continue to happen, even when privacy and security is a top priority as it is in financial institutions and credit bureaus.

It is critical that privacy be the foundation in Health IT, or Americans’ health information will be the most valuable and available information on the market.

From the Fast Company Article: Michelle Obama’s Credit Report Hacked

“Three of the major credit agencies were hacked and information about Michelle Obama, Beyonce and numerous other celebrities has been leaked on an unnamed website, gossip site TMZ first reported on Tuesday.

Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax confirmed to Bloomberg News that they had found cases where information had been accessed unlawfully by hackers.”

Google Concedes That Drive-By Prying Violated Privacy

SAN FRANCISCO — Google on Tuesday acknowledged to state officials that it had violated people’s privacy during its Street View mapping project when it casually scooped up passwords, e-mail and other personal information from unsuspecting computer users.

In agreeing to settle a case brought by 38 states involving the project, the search company for the first time is required to aggressively police its own employees on privacy issues and to explicitly tell the public how to fend off privacy violations like this one.

While the settlement also included a tiny — for Google — fine of $7 million, privacy advocates and Google critics characterized the overall agreement as a breakthrough for a company they say has become a serial violator of privacy.

Web Site Investigated for Posting Private Data

“WASHINGTON — Law enforcement officials said on Tuesday that they had opened an investigation into a Web site that posted the home addresses, Social Security numbers and other personal information for more than a dozen celebrities and politicians, including Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Michelle Obama and Jay-Z.

“At this point, we are trying to determine the sourcing of this and the validity of the stuff that is being posted,” said a senior federal law enforcement official.

The investigation is being led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Secret Service and the Los Angeles Police Department, law enforcement officials said.”

Re: Web Privacy Becomes a Business Imperative

New York Times article Web Privacy Becomes a Business Imperative by Somini Sengupta discusses web privacy affecting businesses’ bottom line. As Mozilla’s Chief Privacy Officer says in the article:

“They’re asking for a different level of privacy on your service,” he said, “You have to listen to that. It’s critical to your business.”

Finally. More Internet companies are realizing the truth behind what PPR has said all along: products and services that don’t offer real privacy and security don’t fly with consumers. While some still may debate the exact meaning of “privacy,” what we consistently see is that consumers want to have control over what happens with their data. It’s about time we start listening to what the public wants and honor everyone’s right to be let alone as they see fit.