WH Initiative: Consumer Privacy Bill Of Rights

In a press release from the White House, February 22nd, 2012:

“The Obama Administration unveiled a “Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights” as part of a comprehensive blueprint to protect individual privacy rights and give users more control over how their information is handled. This initiative seeks to protect all Americans from having their information misused by giving users new legal and technical tools to safeguard their privacy. The blueprint will guide efforts to protect privacy and assure continued innovation in the Internet economy by providing flexible implementation mechanisms to ensure privacy rules keep up with ever-changing technologies. As a world leader in the Internet marketplace, the Administration believes the United States has a special responsibility to develop privacy practices that meet global standards and establish effective online consumer protection. ”

To read more about the proposed bill here are some additional resources:

Read Fact Sheet

Read Full Proposal

Additional White House Press Release

View the Press Conference on CNN’s Video Library

Re: Study shows privacy of medical records is weaker in the U.S.

A study of US and EU health data protections in the Journal of Science & Technology Law concluded Americans “have no real control over the collection of sensitive medical information if they want to be treated.”

Wow! It’s great to see legal scholars second the message that Americans’ rights to health privacy were eliminated.

You can see the article on the study in The Epoch Times here, written by Mary Silver.

For years, Patient Privacy Rights and the bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy were the lone voices carrying this message to Congress and the public.

Public and expert support to restore control over sensitive health data will only build. Soon, no one will buy the argument that privacy is an obstacle to electronic health systems.

Here are some other key quotes from the story:

  • “EU countries have adopted electronic health records and systems, or EHRs, and legally protected privacy at the same time.”
  • “The 1950 Council of Europe Convention identified individual privacy as a fundamental value”
  • “the good aspects of EHRs can be undermined by the bad consequences of poor privacy practices and the ugly effects of inadequate security”
  • “patient privacy is much better protected in Europe”
  • “European patients are able to encapsulate particularly sensitive medical information, and an individual has far greater access to and control over his records in Europe than in America.”

So, again why is the US government rushing to spend $29 billion on health IT systems that offer neither privacy nor security?

Electronic Health Record Security Concerns Are Global

As I mentioned in a recent post, nearly half of Australians may end up boycotting the new voluntary electronic health record (EHR) system when it launches next year because they believe the government can’t provide guarantees that their private medical details will remain private. A new Harris survey sponsored by the identity management company Sailpoint highlights EHR privacy concerns not only in Australia, but also in the United Kingdom and the United States.

According to the survey findings, some 83 percent of Australians, 81 percent of Britons, and 80 percent of Americans express some level of concern about moving their personal medical information to an electronic form…

…For example, since September 2009, at least 9.8 million instances of improper disclosure of medical information have been recorded in the United States. Earlier this month, the renowned Stanford Hospital & Clinics in California added to the total when it announced that the electronic health records of 20 000 of its emergency room patients seen between March 1st and August 31st of 2009, including their names, diagnostic codes, medical record numbers, hospital account numbers, billing charges, and emergency room admission and discharge dates, had been posted for nearly a year (Sept. 9, 2010, to Aug. 23, 2011) on a commercial Web site called Student of Fortune.