Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up

“Many technology experts are blaming the software behind Healthcare.gov for all the problems Americans have encountered while trying to sign up for health insurance in accordance with the Affordable Care Act.”

This interesting article explores what is wrong and what is right about healthcare.gov. To view the full article, please visit Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up.

Security and Privacy of Patient Data Subject of Regulatory Hearing

Representatives of patients, providers, insurers and tech companies testify before federal panel yesterday at the HIT Policy Privacy & Security Tiger Team Virtual Hearing on Accounting for Disclosures.

“We believe it’s the patient’s right to have digital access that is real-time and online for accounting of disclosures,” said Dr. Deborah Peel, the head of Patient Privacy Rights, a group she founded in 2004. Patients “need and want the data for our own health. We need to have independent agents as advisors, independent decision-making tools, we need independence from the institutions and data holders that currently control our information. We need to have agents that represent us, not the interests of corporations,” she said.

“I think the day will come when people will understand that their health information is the most valuable personal information about them in the digital world and that it’s an asset that should be protected in the same way that they protect and control their financial information online,” Peel said.

To view the full article click Security and Privacy of Patient Data Subject of Regulatory Hearing

To view a PDF of the hearing click HIT Policy Privacy & Security Tiger Team Virtual Hearing on Accounting for Disclosures

 

Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

To view the full article, please visit: Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

“…At the HIMSS Media/Healthcare IT News Privacy and Security Forum in Boston, patient privacy advocate Deborah Peel, MD, of Patient Privacy Rights, and UPMC Insurance Services Division Chief AnalyticsOfficer Pamela Peele took the stage to debate the highly-contested issue of whether patients should have full consent over how and with whom their personal health information records are shared.”

Key quotes from Dr. Peel:

“Forty to 50 million people a year do one of three things: avoid or delay diagnosis for critical conditions like cancer, depression and sexually transmitted diseases, or they hide information,” said Peel. “There’s the economic impact of having a system that people don’t trust.”

“He found that only a whopping 1 percent of the public would ever agree to unfettered research use of their data. Even with de-identified data, only 19 percent would agree to the use of their data for research without consent,” said Peel. “On the other hand, when people are asked if they want to participate or have their data used with consent, the public is very altruistic, so we get something very different fuller information, more complete information when the public knows what you’re doing with it and they support the project.”

 

HHS Site Aims To Educate About Health Information Exchange

“On Tuesday, HHS launched a website to help health care providers educate their patients on making informed decisions about health information exchange, The Hill‘s “Healthwatch” reports.”

“Deborah Peel — founder and chair of the not-for-profit Patient Privacy Rights — called HHS’ educational efforts flawed.”

She suggested that HHS instead should have:

  • Mentioned patients’ “fundamental right to health information privacy” in model notices for HIPAA compliance released this week; and
  • Informed patients of their right to a complete list of entities who have accessed their personal health information in electronic health records (FierceHealthIT, 9/17).”

For more information, please visit: HHS Site Aims To Educate About Health Information Exchange

Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center Among 22 Groups Asserting Right to Free Association

 

San Francisco, Ca – infoZine – Five new groups—including civil-rights lawyers, medical-privacy advocates and Jewish social-justice activists—have joined a lawsuit filed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) against the National Security Agency (NSA) over the unconstitutional collection of bulk telephone call records. With today’s amended complaint, EFF now represents 22 entities in alleging that government surveillance under Section 215 of the Patriot Act violates Americans’ First Amendment right to freedom of association.

 

The five entities joining the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles v. NSA lawsuit before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California are: Acorn Active Media, the Charity and Security Network, the National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center. They join an already diverse coalition of groups representing interests including gun rights, environmentalism, drug-policy reform, human rights, open-source technology, media reform and religious freedom.

 

Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

To view the full article, please visit: Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

“The five entities joining the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles v. NSA lawsuit before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California are: Acorn Active Media, the Charity and Security Network, the National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center. They join an already diverse coalition of groups representing interests including gun rights, environmentalism, drug-policy reform, human rights, open-source technology, media reform and religious freedom.”

Privacy groups ask FTC to stop Facebook policy changes

“Half a dozen privacy groups have asked the Federal Trade Commission to stop Facebook from enacting changes to two of its governing documents… In addition to EPIC, CDD and Consumer Watchdog, representatives from Patient Privacy Rights, U.S. Public Interest Research Group and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse also signed the letter.”

To view the full article, please visit: Privacy groups ask FTC to stop Facebook policy changes

Health apps run into privacy snags

“The next time you use your smartphone to inquire about migraine symptoms or to check out how many calories were in that cheeseburger, there is a chance that information could be passed on to insurance and pharmaceuticals companies.

The top-20 health and wellness apps, including MapMyFitness, WebMD Health and iPeriod, are transmitting information to up to 70 third-party companies, according to Evidon, a web analytics and privacy firm”

If you are a subscriber to ft.com, you can view the full article at: Health apps run into privacy snags

FTC Files Complaint Against LabMD for Failing to Protect Consumers’ Privacy

The public would be surprised how little thought or money healthcare businesses put into data security.  LabMD is probably just one of thousands of healthcare businesses that don’t encrypt patient data and whose employees who use file-sharing apps to download music, etc, exposing patient records online.

We need new laws that require businesses that hold health data to be audited to prove they protect it.

Shouldn’t businesses have to prove they use tough data security protections before they are allowed to handle sensitive health information?

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2013/08/labmd.shtm

People Are Changing Their Internet Habits Now That They Know The NSA Is Watching

NSA leaks causing public to mistrust the entire  internet, not just cell phone providers. Quotes:

  • consumer concern about online privacy actually jumped from 48% to 57% between June and July
  • The %  of consumers who adjusted their browser settings and opted out of mobile tracking — jumped 12% and 7% respectively between the first quarter report and July.
  • > 60% of Internet users also reported they do not feel they have control over their personal information online, and 48% said they didn’t know how that information was being used

The lack of personal control over data online will also affect cloud service providers:

  • Cloud-computing industry experts have already estimated that because of the NSA’s surveillance of cloud providers–along with the government’s civil-liberties-trolling methods to get them to comply–more companies will move overseas.
  • ITIF has estimated that this will result in a loss of up to $35 billion for U.S. cloud providers over the next three years, while Forrester analyst James Staten puts the figure at $180 billion.

How will the public react when they find that US health data holders—-such as physicians, hospitals, labs, pharmacies, health data exchanges, insurers, mobile apps, etc, etc— use and sell sensitive personal health data?

To view the full article, please visit:

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3015860/people-are-changing-their-internet-habits-now-that-they-know-the-nsa-is-watching