Usability Failures Heat Up EHR Replacement Market, Black Book Rankings Survey

“According to a recent Black Book Market Research user surveys, the demands of EHR usability can no longer be ignored. 100% of nearly 2,900 practices engaged in the poll report they are employing much stricter selectivity in the replacement market wave and driving more informed decisions as they prepare to swap out original EHR systems.”

To view the full release: Usability Failures Heat Up EHR Replacement Market, Black Book Rankings Survey

Only 26 Percent of Americans Want Electronic Medical Records, Says Xerox Survey

Xerox kindly shared all three years of their annual Electronic Health Records (EHR) online surveys by Harris Interactive. The media, industry and government unrelentingly promote health technology as the latest, greatest best stuff.  But the public ain’t buying it.  They want smart phones, but they don’t  want EHRs.

Clearly the public is not very excited about EHRs; 74% don’t want them. They don’t want them because they understand the problems with EHRs so well.

To view the article, please visit Only 26 Percent of Americans Want Electronic Medical Records, Says Xerox survey

Not only do the surveys show a low percentage of Americans want electronic health records—but it’s remained low; this year at only 26%. Overall 85% of the public has “concerns” about EHRs this year. The surveys also asked about specific ‘concerns’. They found the public is concerned that health data security is poor, data can be lost or corrupted, records can be misused, and that outages or ‘computer problems’ can take records offline and compromise care.  See results below:

To the question do you want your medical records to be digital:

  • 26% said ‘yes’ in 2010
  • 28% said ‘yes’ in 2011
  • 26% said ‘yes’ in 2012

To the question do you have concerns about digital records:

  • 82% said ‘yes’ in 2010
  • 83% said ‘yes’ in 2011
  • 85% said ‘yes’ in 2012

To the question could your information be hacked:

  • 64%  said ‘yes’ in 2010
  • 65%  said ‘yes’ in 2011
  • 63%  said ‘yes’ in 2012

To the question could your digital medical records  be lost or corrupted:

  • 55% said ‘yes’ in 2010
  • 54% said ‘yes’ in 2011
  • 50% said ‘yes’ in 2012

To the question could your personal information be misused:

  • 57% said ‘yes’ in 2010
  • 52% said ‘yes’ in 2011
  • 51% said ‘yes’ in 2012

To the question could a power outage or computer problem prevent doctors from accessing my information:

  • 52% said ‘yes’ in 2010
  • 52% said ‘yes’ in 2011
  • 50% said ‘yes’ in 2012

Report: HIEs failing at true interoperability

See a summary of the report by Mike Miliard at GovHeathITHIEs failing at true interoperability

· Healthcare organizations “must unlock the patient data in EHR silos of hospitals and affiliates to better coordinate and improve quality of care delivered. Health Information Exchange technology is the enabler.”

· Until EHR vendors incorporate a shared set of standards, HIEs will remain in a state of stunted development, said Moore: “Across the board, legacy systems fail to support true interoperability, and vendors are doing little to remedy this situation.”

· The report will also look to the future as to how this [Health Information Exchange or HIE] market will grow and evolve over the next several years as meaningful use requirements take hold, healthcare reform brings forth changes in reimbursement models, access to health data moves to mobile platforms and the consumer takes on a larger role.”
The quotes above show that the health technology industry and the government are beginning to face key facts:

· Data silos endanger patient health and safety: obviously we need our doctors to see relevant parts of our medical records held by other doctors/hospitals.

Electronic Health Records companies, hospitals, and the many other corporations that hold our electronic health information want to continue to “own”, control, and sell our personal health data. They built this system of “silos” that PREVENT data exchange (also called “interoperability”).  Corporations fiduciary duties to make profits for shareholders trump exchanging health information to save patients’ lives and reduce costs!

· Consumers = patients. If we say so, our health records must be shared with our physicians or other health professionals. This is matter of law.

No matter which corporations or health professionals hold our electronic health data, we are entitled to electronic copies. If you say your health data should be sent to another physician or health professional, the data holder must send it. ONLY individual patients or “consumers” have clear rights to control personal health information and have it sent to the other physicians and health professionals who are treating them.

· HIEs, data exchanges where patients have no meaningful control over who can copy and use their health information, are not the answer.

How “Direct” exchange works (via the “Direct Project”): a participant (like our physicians) can send secure, encrypted health information directly to a known, trusted recipient over the Internet. Unlike the case with HIEs, personal health information can’t be “pulled” from the 10, 20, or 100 places that hold our health records. Using the “Direct” method, someone has to decide to send one patient’s data to another person.

We [“consumers”] are the ONLY ones who can quickly, easily, and legally get and “exchange” our own health records at will. Hippocrates Oath, the foundation of the physician-patient relationship, states that sensitive health information should ONLY be shared with the patient’s consent.  Data exchanges like the Direct Project

The only way electronic health systems can work and earn the public’s trust is if data flows are controlled by patients, with very rare legal exceptions.

Holes in the fence?

This story, by Joseph Conn with Modern Healthcare, quotes Patient Privacy Rights, Dr. Blumenthal the National Coordinator for Health IT, and many others, all calling for meaningful consent and privacy.

See these great quotes from Alan Westin:

  • the removal of consent from HIPAA by federal rulemakers in 2002 “left us high and dry,” but with the improvements to HIPAA in the stimulus law, “I think the raw materials for excellence are there.”
  • Privacy protection will depend again on HHS rulemakers, however, he says. (A proposed privacy rule addressing HIPAA modifications from the stimulus law was released by HHS in July, but a final rule is pending.) If it’s not addressed, Westin says, don’t be surprised if there is consumer backlash.
  • “I think we’re at a pivotal moment,” Westin says, given the massive inflows of federal IT subsidies about to begin. “Just imagine a lawsuit as a class action with all the people who would otherwise be swept into a network saying, ‘I did not give my consent,’ and asking the court to intervene.”
  • he sees “a dangerous trend” developing in healthcare IT in which patients are regarded as “inert data elements, not conscious persons” who have the right to make informed choices regarding “how their health information is used beyond the direct care settings.”
  • “You have to have privacy orienting systems at the design,” he says. “If the plumbing all gets in, it’s going to be very costly to tear it down and change it.”

Below are a few sections of the article. To see the full article, follow this link to Modern Healthcare.

Is the primary federal privacy law up to the task of protecting patient information in the 21st century?

It’s a question we put to opinion leaders in the legal, research, policy, ethics, provider and technology fields within the healthcare privacy community. It comes as hospitals and office-based physicians ramp up adoption of electronic health-record systems and join information exchanges to qualify for their share of the $27 billion in federal information technology subsidy payments available under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, also known as the stimulus law…

…A new challenge will be to regulate against the abuse of data outside the scope of HIPAA. “You encounter personal health records, where people put their health information on a cell phone, or on Google and Microsoft, and Google and Microsoft are not covered entities. We need to figure out what the privacy framework is for personal health records and other sharing of personal information.”

Deborah Peel is the practicing psychiatrist who founded the Patient Privacy Rights Foundation in Austin, Texas. To Peel, the HIPAA paradigm is obsolete and inadequate and needs to be replaced.

“You can’t draw a fence around who has sensitive health information,” Peel says. “It might have made sense 20 years ago, but it is a model that doesn’t fit the realities of today. It’s based on an anachronistic view of the healthcare system, as if it’s totally separate from everything else in business and in life, and if technology has taught us anything, it’s that that’s not effective.”

Peel also says the 42 CFR Part 2 framework should be applied to all patient data. “Healthcare information, because of the Internet, is everywhere; therefore, the protections must follow the data,” she says. “If we don’t say a damn word about social media and websites and the rest, we lose because that information is out there in all of those places.”

Content of weblogs written by health professionals

BACKGROUND: Medical weblogs (“blogs”) have emerged as a new connection between health professionals and the public. OBJECTIVE: To examine the scope and content of medical blogs and approximate how often blog authors commented about patients, violated patient privacy, or displayed a lack of professionalism. DESIGN: We defined medical blogs as those that contain some medical content and were apparently written by physicians or nurses. We used the Google search term “medical blog” to begin a modified snowball sampling method to identify sites posting entries from 1/1/06 through 12/14/06. We reviewed five entries per blog, categorizing content and characteristics.
RESULTS: We identified 271 medical blogs. Over half (56.8%) of blog authors provided sufficient information in text or image to reveal their identities. Individual patients were described in 114 (42.1%) blogs. Patients were portrayed positively in 43 blogs (15.9%) and negatively in 48 blogs (17.7%). Of blogs that described interactions with individual patients, 45 (16.6%) included sufficient information for patients to identify their doctors or themselves. Three blogs showed recognizable photographic images of patients. Healthcare products were promoted, either by images or descriptions, in 31 (11.4%) blogs. CONCLUSIONS: Blogs are a growing part of the public face of the health professions. They offer physicians and nurses the opportunity to share their narratives. They also risk revealing confidential information or, in their tone or content, risk reflecting poorly on the blog authors and their professions. The health professions should assume some responsibility for helping authors and readers negotiate these challenges.

Medical blog analysis fuels call for standards

Organizations should set guidelines for appropriate content, says the author of a study of physician and nurse weblogs.

A new study of medical weblogs says anonymity, negative comments about patients and product promotions often prevail.

The July 23 Journal of General Internal Medicine study of 271 blogs authored by physicians and nurses found that more than 40% of such blogs are published anonymously and describe individual patients.

About one-third contain negative comments about the medical profession, and 18% comment negatively about patients.

Resolving Individuals Contributing Trace Amounts of DNA to Highly Complex Mixtures Using High-Density SNP Genotyping Microarrays

Abstract:
“We use high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping microarrays to demonstrate the ability to accurately and robustly determine whether individuals are in a complex genomic DNA mixture. We first develop a theoretical framework for detecting an individual’s presence within a mixture, then show, through simulations, the limits associated with our method, and finally demonstrate experimentally the identification of the presence of genomic DNA of specific individuals within a series of highly complex genomic mixtures, including mixtures where an individual contributes less than 0.1% of the total genomic DNA. These findings shift the perceived utility of SNPs for identifying individual trace contributors within a forensics mixture, and suggest future research efforts into assessing the viability of previously sub-optimal DNA sources due to sample contamination. These findings also suggest that composite statistics across cohorts, such as allele frequency or genotype counts, do not mask identity within genome-wide association studies. The implications of these findings are discussed.”

Study raises data privacy and security concerns about telecommuting

Telecommuting has its distinct advantages: no stressful trips on the freeway, a kitchen full of snacks, working in pajamas, even animal companionship (just watch out for paws on the keyboard).

But working from home isn’t all kitty cats and cozy fires. A study released this morning by the Center for Democracy and Technology and Ernst & Young said telecommuting and other remote access of corporate networks poses data security and privacy challenges for employers. The report, “The State of Telecommuting: Privacy and Security” (PDF download) warns:

It is difficult enough to secure a corporate network with the constant and persistent threat from malicious external parties, from hackers to spammers to viruses. But for the chief technology officer or chief risk officer of today’s organization, perhaps no issue presents more complexity — or more headaches — than the necessity to protect corporate and personal information in an environment where employees travel widely or routinely work at home, using personal computers, laptops, non-corporate-owned machines and personal digital assistants.

4 percent of U.S. doctors use EHRs, new study finds

A milestone study of the adoption of health information technology has produced findings that one of the study’s authors calls troubling and the other calls very sobering.

The survey of 2,758 U.S. doctors, sponsored by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC), found that only 4 percent had a fully functional electronic health record system. Another 13 percent had a basic or partially functional EHR system.

Researchers Fail to Reveal Full Drug Pay

A world-renowned Harvard child psychiatrist whose work has helped fuel an explosion in the use of powerful antipsychotic medicines in children earned at least $1.6 million in consulting fees from drug makers from 2000 to 2007 but for years did not report much of this income to university officials, according to information given Congressional investigators.
By failing to report income, the psychiatrist, Dr. Joseph Biederman, and a colleague in the psychiatry department at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Timothy E. Wilens, may have violated federal and university research rules designed to police potential conflicts of interest, according to Senator Charles E. Grassley, Republican of Iowa. Some of their research is financed by government grants.