Healthcare.gov sends user information to third parties, violating its own privacy policy

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The site sends user information to third parties like Pingdom and DoubleClick that are hidden data collectors.  Here you can find a screenshot in which Ghostery is used to show 7 hidden trackers: Healthcare.gov trackers

 

Google’s $8.5M Privacy Pact Going To Inapt Orgs, Groups Say

“A coalition of privacy groups [including Patient Privacy Rights] stepped up its opposition to the proposed $8.5 million settlement of a California class action alleging Google Inc. illegally divulged search information, saying Wednesday that counsel has failed to show how the seven organizations chosen to receive cy pres funds are appropriate.”

To view the full article (only available by subscription), please visit Google’s $8.5M Privacy Pact Going To Inapt Orgs, Groups Say.

Your prescription history is their business

“A secretive, for-profit service called ScriptCheck keeps track of all your prescriptions, even those you pay for with cash. Life insurers pay for the data.”

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lazarus-20131022,0,1491023.column#ixzz2miu5cODJ

Prescription drug database bill stalls in Pa. House

To view the full article, please visit: Prescription drug database bill stalls in Pa. House

“A bill that would create a prescription drug database intended to help law enforcement nab doctor-shoppers and pill mills hit a hurdle Wednesday in the state House.”

Facebook Eases Privacy Rules for Teenagers

Vindu Goel ties all the critical factors together in Facebook’s ongoing decisions that eliminate teens’ privacy on Facebook: the history of social media and children, teen psychology and bullying, the EU’s response, and how exposing teens online is driven by Zuckerberg’s quest for ever greater profits.

To view the full article, please visit: Facebook Eases Privacy Rules for Teenagers

Five Public Interest Groups Underscore Opposition To Settlement In Google Privacy Suit

“Consumer Watchdog joined the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and three other public interest groups today in re-iterating their opposition to a proposed $8.5 million settlement in a class action suit against Google for privacy violations in the way it handled users’ search data because proposed recipients of settlement funds don’t represent the interests of the class.”

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1529279#ixzz2i1kPTbJt

Everyone expects information they share to be used only once, for one purpose.

This expectation is not a surprise. This ethical principle is called  ‘single use’ of data.

Humans expect to set and regulate personal boundaries in relationships with others.  We only trust people and institutions that don’t share sensitive personal information without asking us first.

People don’t trust governments or corporations that violate their expectations and rights to privacy, ie, rights to control the use of personal data.

When the US public realizes their rights to health information privacy are violated by hidden government  and corporate use and sale of their most intimate, sensitive information: health data, from prescriptions to diagnoses to DNA—the fallout will be far more devastating than the NSA revelations.

After all, Americans expect some level of government surveillance to protect us from terrorism, but the hidden collection and sale of health data by industry and government is very different: it completely shatters trust in the patient-physician relationship. The lack of trust in electronic health systems already causes 40-50 million people to delay or avoid treatment for serious illnesses, or to hide health information. Current technology causes bad health outcomes.

The Internet and US health technology systems are currently designed to violate human and civil rights to privacy.  The Internet and technology must be rebuilt to restore trust and restore our rights to control personal information.

Deb

Google to Sell Users’ Endorsements

The New York Times posted an article reminding us about the permanence of our digital footprints.  Those old posts are never forgotten and can now be used by Google to make a profit.

“Those long-forgotten posts on social networks, from the pasta someone photographed to the rant about her dentist, are forgotten no more. Social networks want to make them easier to find, and in some cases, to show them in ads.  Google on Friday announced that it would soon be able to show users’ names, photos, ratings and comments in ads across the Web, endorsing marketers’ products. Facebook already runs similar endorsement ads.”

“’People expect when they give information, it’s for a single use, the obvious one,’ said Dr. Deborah C. Peel, a psychoanalyst and founder of Patient Privacy Rights, an advocacy group. ‘That’s why the widening of something you place online makes people unhappy. It feels to them like a breach, a boundary violation.’”

“’We set our own boundaries,’” she added. ‘We don’t want them set by the government or Google or Facebook.'”

“Dr. Peel said the rise of new services like Snapchat, which features person-to-person messages that disappear after they are opened, showed how much people wanted more control over how their information was shared.”

To view the full article click here

Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up

“Many technology experts are blaming the software behind Healthcare.gov for all the problems Americans have encountered while trying to sign up for health insurance in accordance with the Affordable Care Act.”

This interesting article explores what is wrong and what is right about healthcare.gov. To view the full article, please visit Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up.