Did Tim Armstrong’s ‘Distressed Babies’ Comment Violate HIPAA Privacy Laws?

US citizens have a fundamental Constitutional right to health information privacy—but can’t easily sue. Only federal employees can sue under the Privacy Act of 1974, as vets did when a laptop with millions of health records was stolen. Even with strong state health privacy laws and state constitutional rights to privacy in place, it’s very hard to sue because most courts demand proof of monetary harm. This new digital disaster: exposing and/or selling sensitive personal health data–can’t be stopped without stronger, clearer federal laws. OR if US citizens boycott the corporations that violate their rights to health privacy.

-Deb

This blog written in response to the following article:

Did Tim Armstrong’s ‘Distressed Babies’ Comment Violate HIPAA Privacy Laws?
By Abby Ohlheiser
The Wire, February 10, 2014

Alan F. Westin, Who Transformed Privacy Debate Before the Web Era, Dies at 83

PPR was deeply saddened by the loss of one of our greatest privacy heroes, Mr. Alan F. Westin, the “father of modern day privacy” and the nation’s most respected academic authority on public attitudes toward health privacy. We are grateful to have had the opportunity to honor him and his tremendous work as one of PPR’s first Louis D. Brandeis Privacy Award recipients in 2012. He truly was a remarkable man whom we will miss dearly, though we know the extraordinary contributions he made to the field of privacy law are everlasting.

Read more about Alan F. Westin here.