Company That Knows What Drugs Everyone Takes Going Public

Nearly every time you fill out a prescription, your pharmacy sells details of the transaction to outside companies which compile and analyze the information to resell to others. The data includes age and gender of the patient, the name, address and contact details of their doctor, and details about the prescription.

A 60-year-old company little known by the public, IMS Health, is leading the way in gathering this data. They say they have assembled “85% of the world’s prescriptions by sales revenue and approximately 400 million comprehensive, longitudinal, anonymous patient records.”

IMS Health sells data and reports to all the top 100 worldwide global pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, as well as consulting firms, advertising agencies, government bodies and financial firms. In a January 2nd filing to the Security and Exchange Commission announcing an upcoming IPO, IMS said it processes data from more 45 billion healthcare transactions annually (more than six for each human on earth on average) and collects information from more than 780,000 different streams of data worldwide.

Deborah Peel, a Freudian psychoanalyst who founded Patient Privacy Rights in Austin, Texas, has long been concerned about corporate gathering of medical records.

“I’ve spent 35 years or more listening to how people have been harmed because their records went somewhere they didn’t expect,” she says. “It got to employers who either fired them or demoted them or used the information to destroy their reputation.”

“It’s just not right. I saw massive discrimination in the paper age. Exponential isn’t even a big enough word for how far and how much the data is going to be used in the information age,” she continued. “If personal health data ‘belongs’ to anyone, surely it belongs to the individual, not to any corporation that handles, stores, or transmits that information.”

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What a Small Moment in the Obamacare Debate Says About Ideological Media

Politics aside, a huge majority of the public agrees that ALL personal information should be protected online, not just when they apply for Obamacare, use electronic health systems, or search online about health.  The right to control the use of personal health data is strongly supported by 95% of Americans.

But like the public, the author doesn’t know that government and corporations already have access to every citizen’s personal health information. See: http://patientprivacyrights.org/truth-hipaa/  HIPAA has not protected our rights to health ‘privacy’ since 2002.

Key conclusions:

  • “The Bush and Obama Administrations both showed with perfect clarity that they don’t give a damn about the privacy rights of Americans; federal bureaucrats serving in both eras have broken the law to hoover up our private information; and every trend points to a federal government intent on expanding its ability to collect information on Americans and share it among agencies. The U.S. has also shown an inability to protect data it stores from being hacked or stolen. Given all that, it isn’t paranoid to imagine that any health information handed over to the federal government won’t remain private for long. A betting man would be wise to conclude that somehow or other, it will at least be seen more widely than Obama Administration officials are promising—especially if additional steps aren’t taken to make the information better protected.”
  • “Outsmarting the most hackish Republicans isn’t enough to fix the flaws in legislation that you championed and passed, substantial warts and all.”

Congress must pass a strong new law soon to giving patients a clear, strong right to control personal health information.  We should decide who can see and use our most sensitive personal information. The nation’s trust in government will only worsen if we cannot protect even our MOST sensitive personal data, from prescription records, to DNA to diagnoses.

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This blog was written in response to the following article: What a Small Moment in the Obamacare Debate Says About Ideological Media