Dangers of Consumer Internet Services in Health Care

Although Internet services like Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, Hotmail and Google Calendar are familiar to patients and doctors, use of such services in health care environments creates a serious privacy risk. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services took action earlier this year when it discovered that Phoenix Cardiac Surgery, a five-physician clinic in Arizona, was posting patient appointments on the web using Google Calendar. As a result, the appointments could be found by anyone searching the Internet. Make sure your doctors and health care providers are not using consumer Internet services such as the ones identified above to store protected health information.

Health care providers should only use cloud services that are designed to comply with HIPAA and offer a HIPAA Business Associate Agreement.

You can contact PPR if you have questions or concerns about the use of consumer Internet services by health care providers and the security of your health information.

Kravis Backs N.Y. Startups Using Apps to Cut Health Costs

The title should have been: “Wall Street trumps the Hippocratic Oath and NY patients’ privacy” or “NY gives technology start-ups free access to millions of New Yorkers sensitive health data without informed consent starting in February”.

Of course we need apps to lower health costs, coordinate care, and help people get well, but apps should be developed using ‘synthetic’ data, not real patient data. Giving away valuable identifiable patient data to app developers is very risky and violates patients legal and ethical rights to health information privacy under state and federal law—each of us has strong rights to decide who can see and use personal health information.

What happens when app developers use, disclose or sell Mayor Bloomberg’s, Governor Cuomo’s, Sec of State Hillary Clinton’s, or Peter Thiel’s electronic health records? Or will access to prominent people’s health records be blocked by the data exchange, while everyone’s else’s future jobs and credit are put at risk by developer access to health data?  Will Bloomberg publish a story about the consequences of this decision by whoever runs the NY health data exchange? Will Bloomberg write about the value, sale, and massive technology-enabled exploitation of health data for discrimination and targeted marketing of drugs, treatments, or for extortion of political or business enemies? Natasha Singer of the NYTimes calls this the ‘surveillance economy’.

The story did not mention ways to develop apps that protect patients’ sensitive information from disclosure to people not directly involved in patient care. The story could have said that the military uses “synthetic” patient data for technology research and app development. They realize that NOT protecting the security and privacy of sensitive data of members of the military and their families creates major national security risks.  The military builds and tests technology and apps on synthetic data; researchers or app developers don’t get access to real, live patient data without tough security clearances and high-level review of those who are granted permission to access data for approved projects that benefit patients. Open access to military health data bases threatens national security. Will open access to New Yorkers’ health data also threaten national security?

NY just started a national and international gold rush to develop blockbuster health apps AND will set off a rush by other states to give away or sell identifiable patient health information in health information exchanges (HIEs) or health information organizations (HIOs)—-by allowing technology developers access to an incredibly large, valuable data base of identifiable patient health information.  Do the developers get the data free—or is NY selling health data? The bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy (represents 10.3M people) worked to get a ban on the sale of patient health data into the stimulus bill because the hidden sale of health data is a major industry that enables hidden discrimination in key life opportunities like jobs and credit. Selling patient data for all sorts of uses is a very lucrative industry.

Further, NY patients are being grossly misled: they think they gave consent ONLY for their health data to be exchanged so other health professionals can treat them. Are they informed that dozens of app developers will be able to copy all their personal health data to build technology products they may not want or be interested in starting in February?

Worst of all the consequences of systems that eliminate privacy is: patients to act in ways that risk their health and lives when they know their health information is not private:

  • -600K/year avoid early treatment and diagnosis for cancer because they know their records will not be private
  • -2M/year avoid early treatment and diagnosis for depression for the same reasons
  • -millions/year avoid early treatment and diagnosis of STDs, for the same reason
  • -1/8 hide data, omit or lie to try to keep sensitive information private

More questions:

  • -What proof is there that the app developers comply with the contracts they sign?
  • -Are they audited to prove the identifiable patient data is truly secure and not sold or disclosed to third parties?
  • -What happens when an app developer suffers a privacy breach—most health data today is not secure or encrypted? If the app developers signed Business Associate Agreements at least they would have to report the data breaches.
  • -What happens when many of the app developers can’t sell their products or the businesses go bust? They will sell the patient data they used to develop the apps for cash.
  • -The developers reportedly signed data use agreements “covering federal privacy rules”, which probably means they are required to comply with HIPAA.  But HIPAA allows data holders to disclose and sell patient data to third parties, promoting further hidden uses of personal data that patients will never know about, much less be able to agree to.  Using contracts that do not require external auditing to protect sensitive information and not requiring proof that the developers can be trusted is a bad business practice.

NY has opened Pandora’s box and not even involved the public in an informed debate.

Hospitals Wary of Hackers Seek Insurance from AIG

Bloomberg News aired a segment on the rising threat of electronic health information systems to patient privacy and tapped Jim Pyles, an expert from the first health privacy summit to speak.  He pointed out that the lack of adequate health data security, the ability to breach thousands or millions of records simultaneously, and the value of health data on black market as key causes of the growing number of reported health data breaches.

View the video here.

Synopsis: Doctors and hospitals adopting electronic patient records under a U.S. government program are exploring insurance policies to help cover the costs of medical-data breaches. Data breaches cost U.S. hospitals $12 billion over the past two years, according to a study by the Poneman Institute. Bloomberg’s Megan Hughes reports on “InBusiness with Margaret Brennan.”

Grab for patient records

MEDICAL market research firm AsteRx plans a grab for doctors’ prescribing records with an offer of powerful business intelligence software free to GPs who sign up.

AsteRx managing director Jon Marshall says de-identified patient data provides valuable insight into healthcare trends — including the spread of infectious diseases — for which drug companies, pharmacists and others are prepared to pay.

“We essentially want to build a large network of GPs so that we can provide data that can be called on in times of need,” he said. “If we were extracting data from every GP in Australia, we would be able to track the swine flu, for instance.

“From the data we already collect I can tell you whether there has been an increase in immunisations, or increased incidences of flu, right up to yesterday’s figures.”