Dr. Peel on ABC World News with Diane Sawyer

Dr. Peel’s interview for Steve Osunsami’s report on the CVS policy requiring employees to report personal health information or pay $50 more per month for coverage was shown during ABC World News with Diane Sawyer on Wednesday, March 20, 2013.

Watch the video below (uses iFrame). If you can’t see it below, you can check it out on ABCNews.com.

Dr. Peel on NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams

Dr. Peel comments on the potentially “destructive” nature of CVS’s new policy in Stephanie Gosk’s report for NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams on Wednesday, March 20, 2013.

See the report below (video uses Flash). If you are unable to watch it here, you can see it on NBCNews.com.

Dr. Peel on American Public Media’s Marketplace

Dr. Peel questions CVS’s new health coverage policy that penalizes employees who would rather keep personal health information, such as their weight and blood glucose levels, private. In Mark Garrison’s report for Marketplace on March 20, 2013, Dr. Peel asks, “How many people can afford to have $600 deducted from their paycheck every year?”

Listen to the story below (uses iFrame). If you’re unable to listen here, you can visit Marketplace.org for the story.

CVS imposes health penalty if workers’ body weight is not reported or they don’t quit smoking

To view the full article, please visit CVS imposes health penalty if workers’ body weight is not reported or they don’t quit smoking.

CVS has instated a very invasive new policy of charging workers a hefty $600 dollar a year fine if they do not disclose sensitive health information to the company’s benefits firm. According to the article, “Under the new policy, nearly 200,000 CVS employees who obtain health insurance through the company will have to report their weight, blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol to WebMD Health Services Group, which provides benefits support to CVS.” However, if employees refuse, they will be charged an extra $50 a month in health insurance costs.

Patient Privacy Rights’ Dr. Deborah Peel tells the public, “‘This is an incredibly coercive and invasive thing to ask employees to do,’…’Rising healthcare costs are killing the economy, and businesses are terrified, Now, we’re all in this terrible situation where employers are desperate to get rid of workers who have costly health conditions, like obesity and diabetes.'”

To learn more about this issue, please visit our Health Privacy Summit Website and register for the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy.

Dr. Peel on Good Morning America

Dr. Peel was interviewed for Steve Osunsami’s report on the CVS policy requiring employees to report personal health information or pay $50 more per month for coverage. The story appeared on Good Morning America on Wednesday, March 20, 2013.

Watch the video below (uses iFrame). If you can’t see it below, you can check it out on ABCNews.com here.

Dr. Peel on CNN’s OutFront with Erin Burnett

Dr. Peel joined Erin Burnett and Reihan Salam on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 for a discussion on CVS’s new policy that requires workers to report health screenings or pay a $600 yearly surcharge.

Watch the video below (uses Flash). If you’re unable to see it below, you can view it here on CNN.com.

See a transcript of the full segment here.

CVS Presses Workers for Medical Information

Christine McConville with the Boston Herald interviewed Dr. Peel for a recent story on “a new CVS policy that requires workers who use company health insurance to report their weight, and body fat and glucose levels to the insurer — or pay a $600-a-year penalty.”

From the Boston Herald Article “CVS presses workers for medical information”:

“This is an incredibly coercive and invasive thing to ask employees to do,” said Patient Privacy Rights founder Dr. Deborah Peel, adding that mounting health care costs have made these policies increasingly common.

“Rising health care costs are killing the economy, and businesses are terrified,” Peel added. “Now, we’re all in this terrible situation where employers are desperate to get rid of workers who have costly health conditions, like obesity and diabetes.”

Re: The Internet is a surveillance state

In response to the CNN article by Bruce Schneier: The Internet is a surveillance state

Bruce Schneier is wrong. Privacy is not over — the public is just now learning how invasive Internet technology, tech corporations, and government really are, and that they ACT to protect and maintain the US surveillance economy. When enough citizens tell Congress and the President to stop, this privacy disaster will stop.

The public is just beginning to WAKE UP. Today is the start of privacy in the Digital Age in the US, not the end.

It’s a lie that people happily give up privacy for “targeted ads” — tech giants like Google, Facebook, etc. have PREVENTED us from having apps and tools that enable privacy (ie, our right TO control personal information online). We have NO choices because government and the data mining industry have prevented us from having meaningful choices.

Signs of intelligent life in the Universe:

  • Attend or watch the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy (its free). The EU Data Protection Supervisor will keynote and so will the US Chief Technology Officer—-the stark differences between US and EU data protections will be discussed—register at: http://www.healthprivacysummit.org/d/vcq3vz/4W
  • SnapChat—millions of free downloads of an app that shows people want technology that gives THEM control over their data: single use of info (a picture in this case) and the ability to delete info. See: http://patientprivacyrights.org/2013/02/snapchat-and-the-erasable-future-of-social-media/
  • A recent Pew Research Center study found smartphone users are taking action to protect their privacy:
  • The default for Microsoft’s Windows 8 browser is ‘Do Not Track’
    • Microsoft’s Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch said a recent company study of computer users in the United States and Europe concluded that 75 percent wanted Microsoft to turn on the Do Not Track mechanism. “Consumers want and expect strong privacy protection to be built into Microsoft products and services.”
    • See more in the New York Times article: Do Not Track? Advertisers Say ‘Don’t Tread on Us’

DONATE to help Latanya Sweeney and Patient Privacy Rights build a health data map—-we MUST prove that thousands of hidden data users are stealing, using , and selling our personal health data: http://patientprivacyrights.org/donate/

SEE Latanya describe thedataMap at: http://patientprivacyrights.org/thedatamap/
This is the beginning of privacy, the war has just begun.

Health IT Gurus predict the Next Big App

To view the full article, please visit Health IT Gurus predict the Next Big App.

“Mobile healthcare apps are multiplying fast and putting a vast array of new tools in the hands of patients and the providers who deliver their care. The pace and scope of innovation makes it hard to imagine what app developers will create next. So we put the question to some of the thinkers in the best position to know what’s needed and what’s possible.”

Here are a few key quotes from the article:

Dr. Deborah Peel, founder of Patient Privacy Rights Foundation, a privacy advocacy organization:

“People want control of their information. They want to be able to decide who sees it and make it go away. And so I think that the next big thing in healthcare is going to be that kind of control for patients over their information.”

Dr. Farzad Mostashari, head of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at HHS:

“We are going to be in an era where everyone is going to be looking to improve health and healthcare at lower cost. And we are going to be looking at every underutilized resource in healthcare. And the greatest, the most underutilized resource in healthcare is the patient and their family members…”

Putting Health IT on the Path to Success

“The promise of health information technology (HIT) is comprehensive electronic patient records when and where needed, leading to improved quality of care at reduced cost. However, physician experience and other available evidence suggest that this promise is largely unfulfilled.

Comprehensive records require more than having every physician and hospital use an electronic health record (EHR) system. There must also be an effective, efficient, and trustworthy mechanism for health information exchange (HIE) to aggregate each patient’s scattered records into a complete whole when needed. This mechanism must also be accurate and reliable, protect patient privacy, and ensure that medical record access is transparent and accountable to patients.”

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