Privacy Tools: Opting Out from Data Brokers

By Julia Angwin
ProPublica, Jan. 30, 2014

Data brokers have been around forever, selling mailing lists to companies that send junk mail. But in today’s data-saturated economy, data brokers know more information than ever about us, with sometimes disturbing results.

Earlier this month, OfficeMax sent a letter to a grieving father addressed to “daughter killed in car crash.” And in December, privacy expert Pam Dixon testified in Congress that she had found data brokers selling lists with titles such as “Rape Sufferers” and “Erectile Dysfunction sufferers.” And retailers are increasingly using this type of data to make from decisions about what credit card to offer people or how much to charge individuals for a stapler.

During my book research, I sought to obtain the data that brokers held about me. At first, I was excited to be reminded of the address of my dorm room and my old phone numbers. But thrill quickly wore off as the reports rolled in. I was equally irked by the reports that were wrong — data brokers who thought I was a single mother with no education — as I was by the ones that were correct — is it necessary for someone to track that I recently bought underwear online? So I decided to opt out from the commercial data brokers.

View the full article here, Privacy Tools: Opting Out from Data Brokers and get a list of the names of companies that track your information, links to their privacy pages, and instructions on how to opt out.

 

 

WPF Report — Paying out of Pocket to Protect Health Privacy: A New but Complicated HIPAA Option; A Report on the HIPAA Right to Restrict Disclosure

San Diego & Washington, D.C. — The World Privacy Forum published a new report today that helps patients understand and use the new HIPAA right to restrict disclosure of their medical information to health plans when treatment is paid for out of pocket in full. The report contains practical advice and tips for patients about how to navigate the new right, which went into effect last year. Paying Out of Pocket to Protect Health Privacy: A New But complicated HIPAA Option; A Report on the HIPAA Right to Restrict Disclosure is one of the first reports on this topic written for patients.

“The new HIPAA right that lets patients restrict disclosures of their health information is actually not well known yet, and that needs to change,” said Pam Dixon, Executive Director of the World Privacy Forum. “This report has specific, concrete tips and information that will help patients use this important new right.” The report, written by Bob Gellman and Pam Dixon is available free of charge at www.worldprivacyforum.org.

Key points:

  • A patient has the right to prevent a health care provider from reporting information to a health insurer if the patient pays in full.
  • In order to prevent disclosure of information to a health plan, patients must make a Request to Restrict Disclosure.
  • Under the new changes to HIPAA, a patient has the firm right to demand, not just request, that a provider not disclose PHI to a health plan when certain conditions are met.
  • The conditions to be met can be complex, and work best with some advance planning.

Additional tips are in the report.

The bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy worked to get this key consumer protection into HITECH.

Bob Gellman and Pam Dixon are available to discuss tips and advice for patients on how to use the new HIPAA right.

Links:

The report Paying Out of Pocket to Protect Health Privacy: A New But complicated HIPAA Option; A Report on the HIPAA Right to Restrict Disclosure is available in PDF or in text.

Permalink: http://www.worldprivacyforum.org/2014/01/wpf-report-paying-out-of-pocket-to-protect-health-privacy/

Contact:

Bob Gellman 202-543-7023

Pam Dixon 760-712-4281

info@worldprivacyforum.org

Brokers Trade on Sensitive Medical Data with Little Oversight, Senate Says

“Marketers maintain databases that purport to track and sell the names of people who have diabetes, depression, and osteoporosis, as well as how often women visit a gynecologist, according to a Senate report published Wednesday.

The companies are part of a multibillion-dollar industry of “data brokers” that lives largely under the radar, the report says. The report by the Senate Commerce Committee says individuals don’t have a right to know what types of data the companies collect, how people are placed in categories, or who buys the information.

The report came in advance of a committee hearing on industry practices Wednesday afternoon.

The report doesn’t contain any new evidence of wrongdoing by the industry, but it underscores the tremendous increase in the sale and availability of consumer information in the digital age. An industry which began in the 1970s collecting data from public records to help marketers send direct mail has become an engine of a global $120 billion digital-advertising industry, helping marketers deliver increasingly targeted ads across the web and on mobile phones.”

To view the full article please visit: Brokers Trade on Sensitive Medical Data with Little Oversight, Senate Says