Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center Among 22 Groups Asserting Right to Free Association

 

San Francisco, Ca – infoZine – Five new groups—including civil-rights lawyers, medical-privacy advocates and Jewish social-justice activists—have joined a lawsuit filed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) against the National Security Agency (NSA) over the unconstitutional collection of bulk telephone call records. With today’s amended complaint, EFF now represents 22 entities in alleging that government surveillance under Section 215 of the Patriot Act violates Americans’ First Amendment right to freedom of association.

 

The five entities joining the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles v. NSA lawsuit before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California are: Acorn Active Media, the Charity and Security Network, the National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center. They join an already diverse coalition of groups representing interests including gun rights, environmentalism, drug-policy reform, human rights, open-source technology, media reform and religious freedom.

 

Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

To view the full article, please visit: Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

“The five entities joining the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles v. NSA lawsuit before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California are: Acorn Active Media, the Charity and Security Network, the National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center. They join an already diverse coalition of groups representing interests including gun rights, environmentalism, drug-policy reform, human rights, open-source technology, media reform and religious freedom.”

Consumer Watchdog and Other Privacy Groups Urge FTC to Block Pending Facebook Privacy Changes

“A coalition of six consumer privacy groups is calling on the Federal Trade Commission to enforce an earlier consent order with Facebook and block proposed changes in the social network’s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities and its Data Use Policy because the proposed changes violate the 2011 settlement with the Commission.”

“The changes will allow Facebook to routinely use the images and names of Facebook users for commercial advertising without consent,” the groups said. “The changes violate Facebook’s current policies and the 2011 Facebook settlement with the FTC. The Commission must act to enforce its order.”

Signing the letter were Consumer Watchdog, the Electronic Privacy Information (EPIC), the Center for Digital Democracy, Patient Privacy Rights, U.S. PIRG, and Privacy Rights Clearing House. Read a copy of the letter here: http://www.consumerwatchdog.org/resources/ltrfacebookftc090413.pdf

“Facebook has long played fast and loose with users’ data and relied on complex privacy settings to confuse its users, but these proposed changes go well beyond that,” said John M. Simpson, Consumer Watchdog’s Privacy director. “Facebook’s overreach violates the FTC Consent Order that was put in place after the last major privacy violation; if the Commission is to retain any of its credibility, it must act immediately to enforce that order.”

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/consumer-watchdog-and-other-privacy-groups-urge-ftc-to-block-pending-facebook-privacy-changes-2013-09-05

People Are Changing Their Internet Habits Now That They Know The NSA Is Watching

NSA leaks causing public to mistrust the entire  internet, not just cell phone providers. Quotes:

  • consumer concern about online privacy actually jumped from 48% to 57% between June and July
  • The %  of consumers who adjusted their browser settings and opted out of mobile tracking — jumped 12% and 7% respectively between the first quarter report and July.
  • > 60% of Internet users also reported they do not feel they have control over their personal information online, and 48% said they didn’t know how that information was being used

The lack of personal control over data online will also affect cloud service providers:

  • Cloud-computing industry experts have already estimated that because of the NSA’s surveillance of cloud providers–along with the government’s civil-liberties-trolling methods to get them to comply–more companies will move overseas.
  • ITIF has estimated that this will result in a loss of up to $35 billion for U.S. cloud providers over the next three years, while Forrester analyst James Staten puts the figure at $180 billion.

How will the public react when they find that US health data holders—-such as physicians, hospitals, labs, pharmacies, health data exchanges, insurers, mobile apps, etc, etc— use and sell sensitive personal health data?

To view the full article, please visit:

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3015860/people-are-changing-their-internet-habits-now-that-they-know-the-nsa-is-watching

Jonah Goldberg: Civil Libertarians’ Hypocrisy

This insightful piece highlights the drastic violations of our current healthcare system in relation to the recent NSA breach.

Key quote from the article:

“What I have a hard time understanding, however, is how one can get worked up into a near panic about an overreaching national security apparatus while also celebrating other government expansions into our lives, chief among them the hydrahead leviathan of the Affordable Care Act (aka ObamaCare). The 2009 stimulus created a health database that will store all your health records. The Federal Data Services Hub will record everything bureaucrats deem useful, from your incarceration record and immigration status to whether or not you had an abortion or were treated for depression or erectile dysfunction.”

Snowden Took a Job To Leak NSA Secrets? Cool. Let’s Have More Like Him at the DOJ, IRS …

Jul. 2, 2013  Reason.com

Much has been made of Edward Snowden telling the South China Morning Post that he deliberately took a job with Booz Allen to gather up evidence of National Security Agency spying so he could leak it to the world. This makes the international man of government officials’ mysteries even more traitorish to the authority-worshippers who already didn’t like his revealing widespread surveillance by the U.S. For the rest of us, it means he set out to do a thorough job before giving the state a well-deserved kick in the ‘nads. This is a guy who apparently deliberately infiltrated the security apparatus, got hold of its dark secrets, and imposed a little of that “transparency” we’d been promised. We could use a few thousand more like him at the IRS, the Justice Department, the DEA, in the Obamacare bureaucracy, local police forces …

To view the full article please visit Snowden Took a Job To Leak NSA Secrets? Cool.

My Routine – Mark Rothstein, Law Professor

To view the full article, please visit My Routine – Mark Rothstein, Law Professor.

This is a very interesting article about Mark Rothstein’s opinion of current governmental actions involving privacy law. Rothstein asserts, “We live in an age in which consent should not be mistaken for choice. We click through consent on software without even reading it. Even if we technically consented, I doubt very much whether the average person would say, ‘Oh sure, it’s OK for my phone company to accumulate all this data about me.’”

In the interview, Rothstein also comments on the views of Louis D. Brandeis, saying “He felt that the government set the tone for society. If the government doesn’t value privacy and invades people’s privacy, then everybody will do that. He also thought it was very important that government activities be subject to review by the political process and the people.”

What is Snowden’s Impact on Health IT?

To view the full article, please visit What is Snowden’s Impact on Health IT?

This is a highly interesting article about the effect of Edward Snowden’s actions on health IT. In the interview with PPR’s own Dr. Deborah Peel, the issues of privacy that our government is currently facing can also be applied to the healthcare industry. As Dr. Peel aptly states, “The Department of Health and Human Services claims its actions are justified to lower healthcare costs. These are obviously very different agencies collecting different kinds of very sensitive personal information, but both set up hidden, extremely intrusive surveillance systems that violate privacy rights and destroy trust in government.”

A key argument that Dr. Peel makes is “The benefits of technology can be reaped in all sectors of our economy without the harms if we restore/update our laws to assure privacy of personally identifiable information in electronic systems. Our ethics, principles, and fundamental rights should be applied to the uses of technology.”

What is Snowden’s Impact on Health IT?

This article expounds upon the implications of Edward Snowden’s actions for the Health IT industry.

Key quotes:

Deborah Peel, MD, founder of Patient Privacy Rights, says there are many parallels between the Snowden controversy and the U.S. healthcare system.

According to Peel, the NSA has one million people with top security clearance to 300 million people’s data. The U.S. healthcare system has hundreds of millions of people — none with top security clearances, and the majority with inadequate basic training in security or privacy — who can access millions of patients’ most sensitive health records. Further, we don’t know how many millions of employees of BAs, subcontractors, vendors and government agencies have access to the nation’s health data, she added.

“Corporations and their employees that steal or sell Americans’ health data for ‘research’ or ‘public health’ uses or for ‘data analytics’ without patients’ consent or knowledge are rewarded with millions in profits; they don’t have to flee the country to avoid jail or charges of espionage,” she said.

“The NSA justifies its actions using the war on terror,” Peel added. “The Department of Health and Human Services claims its actions are justified to lower healthcare costs. These are obviously very different agencies collecting different kinds of very sensitive personal information, but both set up hidden, extremely intrusive surveillance systems that violate privacy rights and destroy trust in government.”

“The benefits of technology can be reaped in all sectors of our economy without the harms if we restore/update our laws to assure privacy of personally identifiable information in electronic systems. Our ethics, principles, and fundamental rights should be applied to the uses of technology,” Peel says.

Privacy Hawk: Put Patients at Center of Health Information Exchange (Quotes Dr. Peel)

“If healthcare organizations truly want to protect patient privacy and earn public trust regarding electronic health records (EHRs), they need to let go of the notion that institutions control individual data and look for technology that lets patients take charge of information flow…”

Key quotes from the article:

  • -”Many commercial EHRs started as systems to improve the operational side of healthcare and increase reimbursement, not to improve clinical care”
  • -”‘We’re stuck with these frankly primitive and privacy-disruptive systems that need to be fixed,’ Peel said at WTN Media’s 11th annual Digital Health Conference.”
  • -To Peel, last week’s revelations that the National Security Agency has been tracking phone calls and e-mails of virtually every American for at least six years shined a light on an issue that long has been prevalent in the healthcare industry.
  • -”‘In healthcare we actually have a total surveillance economy, too,’ said Peel, an Austin, Texas, psychiatrist.”
  • “‘We don’t actually know where our health data goes. We have no chain of custody, much less control over our health information,’ she said. Having personal information get out could lead to ‘health discrimination’ in employment or insurance coverage for patients with mental health disorders, sexually transmitted diseases or cancer, Peel added, and the threat of a breach often leads to care avoidance.”