ACP Supports Creating National Rx Drug Monitoring Database

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
 
The American College of Physicians supports the development of a national prescription drug monitoring program, which would create a single database that physicians and pharmacies could electronically review before prescribing controlled substances, according to a position paper, CBS News reports. The paper was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine on Monday (Jaslow, CBS News, 12/9).

 

A new national drug data base will extend the failed “War on Drugs”, criminalize millions more, increase patients’ reluctance to use controlled substances, and NOT improve treatment for addiction. US prescriptions are already collected and sold daily by prescription data aggregators like IMS Health, Merck Medco, SureScripts, etc., etc. These businesses all sell the nation’s prescription data to any willing buyers.Meanwhile neither physicians nor patients can get electronic copies of prescription data to improve care.Who should health technology benefit? Patients or corporations?

Why not use patients’ prescription data, already being collected by the hidden data aggregation industry, to improve patient health?

Why not use technology to strengthen the patient-physician relationship and to ensure effective diagnosis and treatment?

For example, here is one way technology could be re-designed to help patients:

Anytime a patient gets a controlled substance prescription, existing systems could automatically search for any prior controlled substance prescriptions the patient received in the last month. If a second or third prescription is found, the physician(s) and patient could be automatically notified and resolve together whether it should be filled or not—and how best to treat the patient’s symptoms

Technology should give patients and doctors they data they need for effective TREATMENT. It’s sad that such a prominent physician group supports giving law enforcement automatic access to every controlled substance prescription in the US. Law enforcement should only be able to access such sensitive patient data AFTER someone has committed a crime or with a judge’s approval.

Why open ALL prescriptions to law enforcement surveillance when the vast majority of patients taking controlled substances are not criminals?

Addiction is NOT a crime, it’s a very treatable medical illness.

deb