Why privacy should be among the first considerations of a health care app developer

Given all the complexities app developers need to worry about already–user experience, piquing doctors’ and patients’ interest, performance, accommodation of multiple devices–do they have time to worry about patient privacy too? The Health Privacy Summit on June 5 and 6 in Washington, DC explained why they should–in fact, that a respect for privacy may do more to promote an app than any other feature.

The headlines over the past week should be enough to persuade you that you don’t want to be seen as one of the creeps. It’s takes more time and digging around, though, to learn what patients really want and how to write an app that fulfills their expectations.

Certainly, Fair Information Practices and proper security are a place to start, and below I’ll list a few things developers need to keep in mind. But overriding all these technical details are questions of business model. Can you make money without treating patients as so many assets to sell?

Re: Federal Agencies Paint Regulatory Landscape with Broad Brushstrokes

The Genomics Law Report (GLR) posted an interesting blog about the emergence of mobile health (mHealth) and the role many believe it could play in improving the quality and delivery of health care. It discusses how the mHealth regulatory landscape is still in its early stages of formation and has many key players and components that will help guide its development. It then outlines many of the players, such as the FDA, FCC, FTC, and HHS, and the various ways in which each organization might help shape the future of mHealth.

The story also makes mention of the FTC’s “privacy by design” recommendation for mobile applications, which is undoubtedly a critical component to protecting patients’ privacy as more innovative technologies and apps hit the marketplace. However, aside from ensuring that strong privacy controls are built into the apps up front, it will also be important to make sure patients have other important privacy protections, like control over their sensitive health information, no matter the medium used to collect and share it.

To read the full blog from GLR, click here.