Re: The Internet is a surveillance state

In response to the CNN article by Bruce Schneier: The Internet is a surveillance state

Bruce Schneier is wrong. Privacy is not over — the public is just now learning how invasive Internet technology, tech corporations, and government really are, and that they ACT to protect and maintain the US surveillance economy. When enough citizens tell Congress and the President to stop, this privacy disaster will stop.

The public is just beginning to WAKE UP. Today is the start of privacy in the Digital Age in the US, not the end.

It’s a lie that people happily give up privacy for “targeted ads” — tech giants like Google, Facebook, etc. have PREVENTED us from having apps and tools that enable privacy (ie, our right TO control personal information online). We have NO choices because government and the data mining industry have prevented us from having meaningful choices.

Signs of intelligent life in the Universe:

  • Attend or watch the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy (its free). The EU Data Protection Supervisor will keynote and so will the US Chief Technology Officer—-the stark differences between US and EU data protections will be discussed—register at: http://www.healthprivacysummit.org/d/vcq3vz/4W
  • SnapChat—millions of free downloads of an app that shows people want technology that gives THEM control over their data: single use of info (a picture in this case) and the ability to delete info. See: http://patientprivacyrights.org/2013/02/snapchat-and-the-erasable-future-of-social-media/
  • A recent Pew Research Center study found smartphone users are taking action to protect their privacy:
  • The default for Microsoft’s Windows 8 browser is ‘Do Not Track’
    • Microsoft’s Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch said a recent company study of computer users in the United States and Europe concluded that 75 percent wanted Microsoft to turn on the Do Not Track mechanism. “Consumers want and expect strong privacy protection to be built into Microsoft products and services.”
    • See more in the New York Times article: Do Not Track? Advertisers Say ‘Don’t Tread on Us’

DONATE to help Latanya Sweeney and Patient Privacy Rights build a health data map—-we MUST prove that thousands of hidden data users are stealing, using , and selling our personal health data: http://patientprivacyrights.org/donate/

SEE Latanya describe thedataMap at: http://patientprivacyrights.org/thedatamap/
This is the beginning of privacy, the war has just begun.

Re: Car X.O. cares about health

In response to the Healthcare IT News article: Car X.O. cares about health

This sounds like a bad joke: your new Ford car’s “SYNC” technology monitors your stress, blood sugars, blood pressure, gives you allergy alerts while tracking your behavior behind the wheel and how distracted you are. But it’s no joke, it’s in 5 million cars.
According to Ford:

  • “There’s a strong business case to explore health options”
  • “consumers are on the road more than ever”
  • “Drivers could manage their health while in motion, said Strumolo, or more likely while at a red light.”
  • “Ford has forged partnerships with Healthrageous Microsoft, Medtronic, IMS, WellDoc and others.”

What business case? How does tracking your health give Ford and health-monitoring technologies a way to make money?

Answer: selling your health data, most likely to auto insurers, health insurers, life insurers, and employers like trucking companies and those who employ drivers.

It would be great for us to have this kind of information about our bodies and minds so we can act to improve our health or share it with our doctors: instead, it’s sold to discriminate against us.

Surveillance and collection of the nation’s health data is a growth industry worth hundreds of billions in annual revenue to corporate America—-but what value do we get from that?

But state lawmakers can fix the broken HIPAA Privacy Rule and require meaningful, informed consent before EVERY use or collection of our health information—-we don’t have to wait for Congress. We can fix this in our home states.

Re: Web Privacy Becomes a Business Imperative

New York Times article Web Privacy Becomes a Business Imperative by Somini Sengupta discusses web privacy affecting businesses’ bottom line. As Mozilla’s Chief Privacy Officer says in the article:

“They’re asking for a different level of privacy on your service,” he said, “You have to listen to that. It’s critical to your business.”

Finally. More Internet companies are realizing the truth behind what PPR has said all along: products and services that don’t offer real privacy and security don’t fly with consumers. While some still may debate the exact meaning of “privacy,” what we consistently see is that consumers want to have control over what happens with their data. It’s about time we start listening to what the public wants and honor everyone’s right to be let alone as they see fit.

IT’s surprising leader in patient privacy

IT vendors will make billions of dollars on electronic health records (EHR) – if we can get people to use them. But vendors are mostly silent on the issue of health privacy…

The problem
Dr. Deborah Peel, a psychiatrist and founder of Patient Privacy Rights said in a recent column in the Wall Street Journal:

In 2002, under President George W. Bush, the right of a patient to control his most sensitive personal data—from prescriptions to DNA—was eliminated by federal regulators implementing the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Those privacy notices you sign in doctors’ offices do not actually give you any control over your personal data; they merely describe how the data will be used and disclosed.

But patients are right to fear the release of potentially embarrassing information on such health issues as STDs, depression or substance abuse problem, abortions or miscarriages and other issues that should be between a patient and their doctor – not a mortgage company or an employer.

Privacy & Publicity

SXSW 2010 Interactive Festival: Opening Remarks: Privacy & Publicity

Danah Boyd explains in this presentation what privacy is and why it is important in all aspects, but specifically in social networking.

One of the world’s foremost authorities on social networks, Boyd works at Microsoft Research New England and also serves as a Fellow at the Harvard University Berkman Center for Internet and Society. Boyd recently completed her PhD in the School of Information at the University of California-Berkeley.

U.K. mulls handing off national health records to Microsoft, Google

Conservatives reportedly pushing for privitization

The British government is reportedly preparing a plan to give national health records to either Google or Microsoft, rather than creating a massive government database. Reports of the plan have sparked vigorous debates in the United Kingdom

The plan, as described in the reports, would privatize the National Programme for Information Technology’s Care Records Service. The government would entrust health records to either Microsoft HealthVault or Google Health.

Britain’s National Audit Office warns that the government’s digitization project is over budget and behind schedule, with a total cost to taxpayers of more than 12.7 billion British pounds sterling, the BBC said.

UK Handing off their health records?

Federal Computer Week: U.K. mulls handing off national health records to Microsoft, Google

It will be interesting to see which one the UK chooses. Microsoft joined the bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy to urge Congress to restore consumer control over PHI in 2007. Google has not.

MS signed Coalition letters in 2007 and 2009, and agreed to support the Coalition’s tough privacy principles and health privacy rights in electronic systems. HealthVault was built to adhere to the Coalition’s stringent privacy principles. Open, public promises by major corporations are taken very seriously by federal regulatory agencies and consumer advocates.

The promises by the technology corporations that joined the Coalition are a rebuke to other HIT vendors and the data mining industry that will do anything to get their hands on PHI for all sorts of uses that patients would never agree to.

Today, the clearest sign of serious corporate commitment to health privacy rights is joining the Coalition for Patient Privacy and standing with consumers to build an ethical, legal HIT system—the only kind that will be trusted and succeed.

UK Handing off their health records?

Federal Computer Week:U.K. mulls handing off national health records to Microsoft, Google

It will be interesting to see which one the UK chooses. Microsoft joined the bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy to urge Congress to restore consumer control over PHI in 2007. Google has not.
MS signed Coalition letters in 2007 and 2009, and agreed to support the Coalition’s tough privacy principles and health privacy rights in electronic systems. HealthVault was built to adhere to the Coalition’s stringent privacy principles. Open, public promises by major corporations are taken very seriously by federal regulatory agencies and consumer advocates.

The promises by the technology corporations that joined the Coalition are a rebuke to other HIT vendors and the data mining industry that will do anything to get their hands on PHI for all sorts of uses that patients would never agree to.

Today, the clearest sign of serious corporate commitment to health privacy rights is joining the Coalition for Patient Privacy and standing with consumers to build an ethical, legal HIT system—the only kind that will be trusted and succeed.