Re: Poor Prognosis for Privacy

In response to The Wall Street Journal article by Melinda Beck: Poor Prognosis for Privacy

Most healthcare institutions and John Halamka ignore the fact that for over a decade technology has empowered millions of patients to control which parts of their electronic health records are disclosed for mental health and addiction treatment. The technology for ‘segmentation’ exists.

Congress, the courts, state and federal laws, and medical ethics require that patients control who can see and use sensitive personal health data, yet federal regulators who write the rules for industry have not required electronic health systems to use either ‘segmentation’ or other technologies like meta-data tagging that could also enable selective disclosures of health information.

When the public finds out they can’t control the use or disclosure of sensitive personal health data, many millions will refuse early diagnosis and treatment for cancer, depression, and STDs every year—and millions more will hide information, refuse tests, and act in ways that put their health at risk. These are bad outcomes.

Should the public be forced to use health technology systems that cause bad outcomes? Why not require technology that IMPROVES health outcomes?