3 Reasons Your Medical Records Are at Risk

When hospitals find themselves in the middle of a breach, they usually prioritize improving their security to prevent further security breach incidents.

In addition to defending themselves against data breaches, health systems also need to find the right balance to adequately protect their patients’ privacy.

Since medical information is stored digitally, patients may not be fully aware how crucial it is to protect their data from being seen by unauthorized persons. Some privacy breaches may be avoidable, and learning from these mistakes is essential for health systems to maintain security of sensitive patient information. Here are three reasons why patient security may be lacking at health organizations.

Privacy Is on the Back Burner

When health IT systems are built, ensuring patient privacy is usually not on the forefront of designers’ and engineers’ minds. These IT experts usually put system functions ahead of privacy, which could result in poor privacy protection down the road. Some developers may also leave out privacy features altogether, which could put patient information at risk for being compromised.

Human Error

In a recent report, psychiatric facilities in Texas suffered a string of data breaches, but the majority of them were caused by human error, The Republic reported.

Deborah Peel, the Austin founder of watchdog group Patient Privacy Rights, said repeated data breach incidents could lead patients to question whether their information is secure, which could cultivate distrust among patients. “Our patients deserve privacy and expect that their information is kept confidential,” said Christine Mann, spokeswoman for the Texas Department of State Health Services.

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Can Big Data Make Healthcare Better, Cheaper?

December 12, 2013
Medical records are being digitized on a massive scale to bring down the costs of healthcare and, maybe, to produce better outcomes. It also means a loss of patient privacy. President Obama’s Affordable Care Act promotes the digitization of millions of medical records to measure outcomes and contain costs. Big Data may also help doctors better understand many diseases, who’s most likely to get them and what the best treatments might be. It also makes the most intimate kind of personal information available to the government, insurance and drug companies — even prospective employers. Should patients be able to say “yes” or “no?”

 

Host, Warren Olney of NPR affiliate KCRW, interviews Dr. Deborah Peel, to discuss the risks and the benefits of Big Data in the field of medicine. She is joined by fellow panelists Joel Dudley, Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Mt. Sinai Medical School, Iya Khalil, Executive VP and Co-Founder, GNS Healthcare, and Nortin Hadler, Professor of Medicine and Microbiology/Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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