Health Care, the Cloud, and Privacy, Jan. 7 Panel

Health Care, the Cloud, and Privacy

Phoenix Park Hotel
520 North Capitol Street, NW | Washington, DC 20001
Georgian Room
Monday, January 7, 2013 | 12:00 p.m. ET

On behalf of Patient Privacy Rights (PPR), you are invited to attend a panel discussion on health care system privacy challenges posed by cloud computing. The one-hour discussion, “Health Care, the Cloud, and Privacy,” will be held on Monday, January 7, 2013 at the Phoenix Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. Boxed lunches will be provided.

With technological innovations that promise better efficiency and lower cost, one of the most anticipated developments is how industry and regulators will respond. That question today is focused intently on cloud computing and the implications for corporations with electronic systems containing sensitive consumer health data. Who is handling patient data? How do HIPAA and other health privacy laws and rights function in the cloud? What can policymakers do to better protect our sensitive medical data?

Our distinguished panel will feature:

Joy Pritts
Chief Privacy Officer
Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Deborah C. Peel, MD
Founder and Chair
Patient Privacy Rights (PPR)

Nicolas P. Terry
Hall Render Professor of Law
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Lillie Coney
Associate Director
Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)

Please RSVP to Jenna Alsayegh at jalsayegh@deweysquare.com.

We hope to see you there!

And there is more:
View the Invitation as a PDF
View the Press Release

PPR also sent a letter to the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that urges for more comprehensive guidance on securing patient data in “the cloud.” With the healthcare industry moving their records to electronic databases, PPR sees a number of issues associated with cloud computing services, including compliance with existing healthcare privacy laws like the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, stronger state and federal health information privacy laws, medical ethics, and Americans’ rights to health information privacy. View the letter here.

Living Online: Privacy and Security Issues in a Digital Age

Our lives are increasingly lived online. A large number of Americans routinely exchange information in cyberspace for personal, business, and other purposes. What privacy and security issues present themselves in this relatively new and increasingly ubiquitous space? What particular privacy concerns might apply when specific entities, such as the government, hold or process our information? What particular considerations might apply when the information being transmitted is particularly sensitive, such as health care information or financial information? How do privacy, security, and information ownership concerns function when information is being exchanged on social networking sites?

The November 3, 2009 event featured a lunchtime keynote address by Christopher N. Olsen, the Assistant Director in the Division of Privacy and Identity Protection at the Federal Trade Commission.

A panel discussion was held from 1 – 2:30 pm and featured:

  • Moderator, Jeffrey Rosen, Professor of Law at George Washington University and Legal Affairs Editor for The New Republic
  • Deborah C. Peel, MD, Founder and Chair, Patient Privacy Rights; Chair, Coalition for Patient Privacy
  • Lillie Coney, Associate Director, Electronic Privacy Information Center; Coordinator, Privacy Coalition
  • Alan Davidson, Director of Public Policy, Google

Here is the Video of the Panel:

Tuesday, November 3, 2009
11:30 am – 2:30 pm
Center for American Progress
1333 H. Street NW, 10th Floor
Washington, DC 20005