Health IT Gurus predict the Next Big App

To view the full article, please visit Health IT Gurus predict the Next Big App.

“Mobile healthcare apps are multiplying fast and putting a vast array of new tools in the hands of patients and the providers who deliver their care. The pace and scope of innovation makes it hard to imagine what app developers will create next. So we put the question to some of the thinkers in the best position to know what’s needed and what’s possible.”

Here are a few key quotes from the article:

Dr. Deborah Peel, founder of Patient Privacy Rights Foundation, a privacy advocacy organization:

“People want control of their information. They want to be able to decide who sees it and make it go away. And so I think that the next big thing in healthcare is going to be that kind of control for patients over their information.”

Dr. Farzad Mostashari, head of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at HHS:

“We are going to be in an era where everyone is going to be looking to improve health and healthcare at lower cost. And we are going to be looking at every underutilized resource in healthcare. And the greatest, the most underutilized resource in healthcare is the patient and their family members…”

UPMC, Oracle to help with ID management

To view the article, please visit UPMC, Oracle to help with ID management.

UPMC revealed plans on Thursday to collaborate with Oracle in the development of cloud-based identity management technology to be utilized by small to mid-sized healthcare providers.

According to the article, “CloudConnect Health IT will enable healthcare users to easily manage computer accounts, including adding, modifying and terminating a user’s computer access, officials say. They’ll also help providers manage access based on the user’s job responsibility and provide self-service tools for retrieving forgotten passwords and unlocking accounts, as well as offer comprehensive management reporting.”

This poses a problem because, as Adrian Gropper, MD, points out “Proprietary identity systems risk being coercive of the patient to the extent that they allow aggregation of a patient’s records across multiple institutions without informed patient consent. Voluntary ID systems can be created that are not coercive while still offering the value of global uniqueness.”

Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

View the full article at Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

This urgent issue will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy in Washington, DC on June 5-6, 2013 at Georgetown Law Center.

The opening keynote will be Peter Hustinx, the EU Data Protection Supervisor. He will speak on “A health check on data privacy?”

Register to attend at www.healthprivacysummit.org . Later we will post a link to watch via live-streaming video.

Re: Web Privacy Becomes a Business Imperative

New York Times article Web Privacy Becomes a Business Imperative by Somini Sengupta discusses web privacy affecting businesses’ bottom line. As Mozilla’s Chief Privacy Officer says in the article:

“They’re asking for a different level of privacy on your service,” he said, “You have to listen to that. It’s critical to your business.”

Finally. More Internet companies are realizing the truth behind what PPR has said all along: products and services that don’t offer real privacy and security don’t fly with consumers. While some still may debate the exact meaning of “privacy,” what we consistently see is that consumers want to have control over what happens with their data. It’s about time we start listening to what the public wants and honor everyone’s right to be let alone as they see fit.

theDataMap™

theDataMap™ is an online portal for documenting flows of personal data. The goal is to produce a detailed description of personal data flows in the United States.

A comprehensive data map will encourage new uses of personal data, help innovators find new data sources, and educate the public and inform policy makers on data sharing practices so society can act responsibly to reap benefits from sharing while addressing risks for harm. To accomplish this goal, the portal engages members of the public in a game-like environment to report and vet reports of personal data sharing. More…

Members of the public sign-up to be Data Detectives and then work with other Data Detectives to report and vet data sharing arrangements found on the Internet. Data Detectives are responsible for content on theDataMap™.

See the debut of theDataMap™ from the “Celebration of Privacy” during the 2nd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy here:

How the Insurer Knows You Just Stocked Up on Ice Cream and Beer

View the full article at How the Insurer Knows You Just Stocked Up on Ice Cream and Beer.

Your employer already has access to personal medical information such as how often you get check ups and whether you’re taking prescription mediation through your insurance carrier, but now some companies are beginning to monitor where you shop and what you eat.

Some key quotes from the article:

“…But companies also have started scrutinizing employees’ other behavior more discreetly. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina recently began buying spending data on more than 3 million people in its employer group plans. If someone, say, purchases plus-size clothing, the health plan could flag him for potential obesity—and then call or send mailings offering weight-loss solutions.”

“Some critics worry that the methods cross the line between protective and invasive—and could lead to job discrimination. ‘It’s a slippery-slope deal,’ says Dr. Deborah Peel, founder of Patient Privacy Rights, which advocates for medical-data confidentiality. She worries employers could conceivably make other conclusions about people who load up the cart with butter and sugar.”

“Analytics firms and health insurers say they obey medical-privacy regulations, and employers never see the staff’s personal health profiles but only an aggregate picture of their health needs and expected costs. And if the targeted approach feels too intrusive, employees can ask to be placed on the wellness program’s do-not-call list.”

Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior

Picture a box with 2,000 or 10,000 puzzle pieces inside—any one puzzle piece reveals nothing about the picture. But when all the pieces are assembled, an incredibly detailed picture FULL of information is created.

The data mining industry—including Google, Facebook, Acxiom and thousands more unknown corporations and foreign businesses—assembles the puzzle of who we are from thousands of bits of data we leave online. They know FAR MORE than anyone on Earth knows about each of us—more than what our partners, our moms and dads, our best friends, our psychoanalysts, or our children know about us.

The UK study (abstract below) shows how easy it is for hidden data mining companies to intimately know us (and sell) WHO WE ARE.

Most Americans are not aware of the ‘surveillance economy’ or that data miners can easily collect intimate psychological and physical/health profiles of everyone from online data.

The study:

-“demonstrates the degree to which relatively basic digital records of human behavior can be used to automatically and accurately estimate a wide range of personal attributes that people would typically assume to be private”

-“is based on Facebook Likes, a mechanism used by Facebook users to express their positive association with (or “Like”) online content, such as photos, friends’ status updates, Facebook pages of products, sports, musicians, books, restaurants, or popular Web sites”

-correctly discriminates between:

  • -Homosexual and heterosexual men in 88% of cases
  • -African Americans and Caucasian Americans in 95% of cases
  • -Between Democrat and Republican in 85% of cases
  • -For the personality trait “Openness,” prediction accuracy is close to the test–retest accuracy of a standard personality test

The “surveillance economy” is why the US needs FAR STRONGER LAWS at the very least to prevent the hidden collection, use, and sale of health data, including everything about our minds and bodies, unless we give meaningful informed consent.

This urgent topic, ie whether the US should adopt strong data privacy and security protections like the EU—will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy June 5-6 in DC (it’s free to attend and will also be live-streamed). Register at: www.healthprivacysummit.org

2012 Sets New Record for Reported Data Breaches

Please view the full report at 2012 Sets New Record for Reported Data Breaches

Everyone knows that securing data is hard, but in healthcare much is still not even encrypted. 2012 broke the record for the most data breaches.

  • -“With 2,644 incidents recorded through mid-January 2013, 2012 more than doubled the previous highest year on record (2011)”

“The latest information and research conducted by Risk Based Security suggests that organizations in all industries should be on notice that they face a very real threat from security breaches. Whether it is the constantly increasing security threats, ever-evolving IT technologies or limited security resources, data breaches and the costs related to response and mitigation are escalating quickly. Organizations today need timely and accurate analytics in order to better prioritize security spending based on their unique risks.”

Some key statistics:

“The Business sector accounted for 60.6 percent of all 2012 reported incidents, followed by Government (17.9%),Education (12.0%), and Medical (9.5%). The Business sector accounted for 84.7 percent of the number of records exposed, followed by Government (12.6%), Education (1.6%), and Medical (1.1%).”

“76.8% of reported incidents were the result of external agents or activity outside the organization with hacking accounting for 68.2% of incidents and 22.8% of exposed records in 2012. Incidents involving U.S. entities accounted for 40.7% of the incidents reported and 25.0% of the records exposed.”

Snapchat and the Erasable Future of Social Media

Here is a recent article about SnapChat, which makes pictures and videos shared via the Internet disappear 10 seconds after they are seen.
Internet technologies constantly collect and use personal data without consent. American health IT systems do the very same thing: constantly collect and use sensitive personal health data without consent. New technologies that ‘erase’ data after a single use could prevent secondary collection, disclosures, and sales of everything from our diagnoses to prescription records to DNA.
We are constantly told young Americans don’t care about privacy. Would you be surprised to learn that’s wrong? The truth is the majority of people, young and old, want to control the use of personal data:

  • -“88 percent of participants from ages 18 to 24 responded that there should be a law requiring websites and advertising companies to delete all stored information about an individual upon request”
  • -“94 percent of people from 45 to 54 also supported the idea”

“The default setting for almost everything people share online is that it will live for eternity in the cloud” —-we are forced to surrender control of personal information just to be online. Who believes the US public agreed that total surveillance is a fair price for using the Internet?

Since we can’t STOP personal data from being collected, technologies like Snapchat  and Wickr that make data “erasable” are critical tools to help restore control over personal data.

Americans want the right to be forgotten, BUT FIRST AND FOREMOST, our constitutional RIGHT TO BE LET ALONE should be restored in the digital age.

KEY QUOTES from the article about Snapchat:

  • -“In the U.S., Snapchat was the second-most popular free photo and video app for the iPhone in early February, just behind YouTube and ahead of Instagram.”
  • -Pew Research Center survey found that 57 percent of all app users “have either uninstalled an app over concerns about having to share their personal information, or declined to install an app in the first place for similar reasons.”
  • -A January 2013 study by the Ponemon Institute… found social media to be among the least trusted industries when it comes to protecting customers’ privacy online.
  • -[Snapchat’s] rapid growth demonstrates a huge business opportunity—namely, services aimed at the increasing number of people worried about their social media footprints.
  • -researchers at the University of California at Berkeley found that ….young Americans ….[are] as anxious as their parents about their permanent social records.
  • -88 percent of participants from ages 18 to 24 responded that there should be a law requiring websites and advertising companies to delete all stored information about an individual upon request
  • -94 percent of people from 45 to 54 also supported the idea
  • -“The early adopters of Snapchat are teens in the U.S.”
  • -“Whenever I ask someone, do they want control over the messages and media that they send to others, the answer 100 percent is yes,” says Sell. “There’s no question that this has mainstream appeal.”
  • -Sell talks of private communication as “a universal human right” that largely doesn’t exist in the current digital landscape in which big data companies are continuously harvesting and mining information about our every online utterance.

Ephemeral data is the future

Data Protection Laws, an Ocean Apart

American citizens are like just like EU citizens: they want the same strong rights to control personal information online, especially health information.

See the letter Patient Privacy Rights and other NGOs signed supporting the EU’s tough requirements for data protection.  The letter urges the US government policy makers to support the same tough data protections for US citizens, also embodied in the protections President Obama laid out in the “Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights”.

Unfortunately, the “Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights” exempts all health data, leaving the flawed HIPAA Privacy Rule that eliminates our control over personal health data in effect. The 563 page Omnibus Privacy Rules adds strong data security protections and stronger enforcement of violations for some health data holders and users, but not all. But it does not restore patients’ rights to consent before personal health information is accessed or used, even though the right to control health information has been the law of land for centuries and is the key ethic in the Hippocratic Oath (requires doctors to keep information private and not share it without consent).

US citizens will not trust their physicians or electronic health systems unless they control who can see and use their records, from diagnoses to DNA to prescriptions.