Texas Election 2014: Abbott Pledges to Safeguard DNA

“Texas gubernatorial frontrunner Greg Abbott recently released an extensive list of items he says he’ll push for once elected.. Ths list includes gun rights, campaign ethics, and blocking implementation of the Affordable Care Act, but the number one item is safeguarding your DNA according to KUT News.”

To view the full article, please visit: Texas Election 2014: Abbott Pledges to Safeguard DNA

Myth: The Benefits of Electronic Health Records Outweigh the Privacy Risks

Myth: The Benefits of Electronic Health Records Outweigh the Privacy Risks

Fact: It’s impossible to weigh the ‘benefits’ of EHRs vs. the ‘risks’ when we have no way of knowing what all the ‘risks’ are. Current health IT systems and data exchanges enable unlimited hidden use and sale of personal health data.

There is no map that tracks hidden disclosures of health data to secondary, tertiary, quaternary, etc, etc users. It’s crazy, but we have no ‘chain of custody’ for our most sensitive personal information, health data.

How can we make informed decisions about using EHRs when there is no map to track the 100s-1000s-1,000,000s of places our personal health information, from prescriptions to DNA to diagnoses, ends up?

Take a look at this website: http://www.theDataMap.org

·        Harvard Professor Latanya Sweeney leads this project to map the hidden flows of health data.

·        Patient Privacy Rights is a sponsor.

·        Not only is it impossible for individuals to make an informed decision about the risks and benefits of EHRs, but it’s ALSO impossible for Congress to create sane health reform and healthcare laws, formulate appropriate health and privacy policies that provide ironclad data privacy and security protections when we have no idea where PHI goes, who uses and sells it, or what it’s used for.

·        One example of not knowing where/how our personal health data ends up: Identifiable diabetic patient records are sold online for $14-$25 each. See: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/medical-records-private-abc-news-investigation/story?id=17228986&singlePage=true#.UFKTXVHUF-Y

If you think about privacy-destructive health IT,  it is the exact opposite of what patients expect. And it violates patients’ strong existing rights to health information privacy and control over personal health data:

·        One example: Patients give pharmacies a prescription for only one purpose: to fill their prescription. They don’t expect all 55,000 US pharmacies to sell every prescription, every night. The prescription data mining industry sells our easily identifiable prescription records collects 10s-100s of billions in revenue every year.

·        Another example: Patients expect physicians to keep their records private. They don’t expect physicians or EHRs to sell their sensitive data, treating patient data as another way to make money. But selling patient data is the business model of almost all EHRs, including Practice Fusion, Greenway, Cerner, Athena, GE Centricity, etc, etc. Patients give doctors information for one purpose only: to treat them. They don’t expect it to be used and sold by Business Associates, subcontractors, and subcontractors of the subcontractors for other purposes. Again, in the US patients have had a very long history of rights to health information privacy in law and ethics (the Hippocratic Oath).

 

Fact: the public will only trust health technology if they control their health data and can have real-time lists of those who use their health data. Hidden use of personal health data must stop. Users should ask our consent first. We need control, accountability and transparency to trust health technology.

Abbott’s Privacy Rights Proposals Draw Attention

“Attorney General Greg Abbott‘s support for more stringent privacy laws is getting some notice, as privacy rights activists say his proposals would lead to more protections for Texans. But concerns tied to the enforcement of the proposed policies are also being raised.”

To view the full article, please visit: Abbott’s Privacy Rights Proposals Draw Attention

Rejecting Billions, SnapChat Expects a Better Offer

To view the full article, please visit: Rejecting Billions, SnapChat Expects a Better Offer

SnapChat made front page of NYTimes this morning valued at BILLIONS by WallStreet! This is huge news: the very first privacy app worth billions! If people/industry value control over pictures IMAGINE how many millions of people would want privacy apps to control health data!

A Fraying of the Public/Private Surveillance Partnership

To view the full article, please visit: A Fraying of the Public/Private Surveillance Partnership

The lack of data security and privacy on the ‘HealthCare.gov’ triggered national outrage.For the first time patient privacy is a national issue.

Healthcare.gov’s serious technology flaws sparked huge privacy fears even though ONLY one piece of health data is collected, “Do you smoke?”.

The public now fears that the US government and the health IT industry don’t protect sensitive personal health data. Rightly so. See:

 

But current US health IT systems also enable hidden armies of corporations and government agencies to use sensitive personal health data without patient consent.

If our health data was actually private, how could it be sold on the Internet? Three short videos:

 

We have no map of all the hidden flows of our health data. See examples mapping the hidden flows of US health data:

o   states sell health data: http://thedatamap.org/states.html

o   top buyers of health data: http://thedatamap.org/buyers.html

o   data breaches reveal who purchased health data: http://thedatamap.org/history.html

o   health data is easy to re-identify: http://thedatamap.org/risks.html

The consequences of the lack of patient privacy (control over personal health data) are millions people act to keep health data private:

  • Today 40-50 million people/year act to try to keep health data private:

o   37.5 million people every year hide information to try to keep it private

§  November, 2005. National Consumer Health Privacy Survey, California Healthcare Foundation:http://www.chcf.org/publications/2005/11/national-consumer-health-privacy-survey-2005

o   Over 5 million every year avoid or delay early diagnosis for cancer, mental illness, or sexually-transmitted diseases

§  65 Fed. Reg. at 82,779, 65 Fed. Reg. at 82,777, 65 Fed. Reg. at 82,778

§  Or see page 7: http://patientprivacyrights.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/The-Case-for-Informed-Consent.pdf

Technology can ensure all the benefits and prevent harms. The idea that we must surrender privacy forever to ‘wire’ the healthcare system is false.

Technology should “do no harm” to patients. The cure is to use tough privacy-enhancing technologies.

Healthcare.gov sends user information to third parties, violating its own privacy policy

You might be interested in this story “Healthcare.gov sends user information to third parties, violating its own privacy policy.” 

The site sends user information to third parties like Pingdom and DoubleClick that are hidden data collectors.  Here you can find a screenshot in which Ghostery is used to show 7 hidden trackers: Healthcare.gov trackers

 

Prescription drug database bill stalls in Pa. House

To view the full article, please visit: Prescription drug database bill stalls in Pa. House

“A bill that would create a prescription drug database intended to help law enforcement nab doctor-shoppers and pill mills hit a hurdle Wednesday in the state House.”

Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up

“Many technology experts are blaming the software behind Healthcare.gov for all the problems Americans have encountered while trying to sign up for health insurance in accordance with the Affordable Care Act.”

This interesting article explores what is wrong and what is right about healthcare.gov. To view the full article, please visit Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up.

HHS Site Aims To Educate About Health Information Exchange

“On Tuesday, HHS launched a website to help health care providers educate their patients on making informed decisions about health information exchange, The Hill‘s “Healthwatch” reports.”

“Deborah Peel — founder and chair of the not-for-profit Patient Privacy Rights — called HHS’ educational efforts flawed.”

She suggested that HHS instead should have:

  • Mentioned patients’ “fundamental right to health information privacy” in model notices for HIPAA compliance released this week; and
  • Informed patients of their right to a complete list of entities who have accessed their personal health information in electronic health records (FierceHealthIT, 9/17).”

For more information, please visit: HHS Site Aims To Educate About Health Information Exchange

Trust must be mutual for patient engagement to work

“A recent study in the Journal of the American Informatics Association reports that nearly one in eight patients has withheld information from their healthcare providers due to security concerns. Moreover, most of the respondents were very concerned about the security of their information when it was being shared electronically or by fax. Just last week, advocacy organization Patient Privacy Rights sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services urging the agency to improve privacy protections of patients’ electronic health records, particularly in the cloud and in HIEs.”

Read more: Trust must be mutual for patient engagement to work – FierceEMR http://www.fierceemr.com/story/trust-must-be-mutual-patient-engagement-work/2013-09-18#ixzz2fRtzIBsV
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