NHS England patient data ‘uploaded to Google servers’, full disclosure demanded

The UK government has been debating illegal disclosures of patient health data: “The issue of which organisations have acquired medical records has been at the centre of political debate in the past few weeks, following reports that actuaries, pharmaceutical firms, government departments and private health providers had either attempted or obtained patient data.”

The article closes with quotes from Phil Booth of medConfidential:

  • “Every day another instance of whole population level data being sold emerges which had been previously denied”.
  • “There is no way for the public to tell that this data has left the HSCIC. The government and NHS England must now come completely clean. Anything less than full disclosure would be a complete betrayal of trust.”

Far worse privacy violations are the norm in the US, yet our government won’t acknowledge that US health IT systems enable hidden sales and sharing of patients’ health data.  US patients are prevented from controlling who sees their health records and can’t obtain real-time lists of who has seen and used personal health data.

Learn how the data broker industry violates Americans’ strong rights to control the use of personal health information in IMS Health Holdings’ SEC filing for an IPO:

  • IMS buys and aggregates sensitive “prescription and promotional” records, “electronic medical records,” “claims data,” “social media” and more to create “comprehensive,” “longitudinal” health records on “400 million” patients.
  • All purchases and subsequent sales of personal health records are hidden from patients.  Patients are not asked for informed consent or given meaningful notice.
  • IMS Health Holdings sells health data to “5,000 clients,” including the US Government.
  • IMS buys “proprietary data sourced from over 100,000 data suppliers covering over 780,000 data feeds globally.”

Data brokers claim they don’t violate our rights to health information privacy because our data are “de-identified” or “anonymized”—-but computer scientists have proven it’s easy to re-identify aggregated, longitudinal data sets:

deb

This blog was written in response to the following article: NHS England patient data ‘uploaded to Google servers’, Tory MP says

The Biggest Data Myths of 2013

The biggest myth about “Big Data” users of the entire nation’s health information is that personal health data was acquired legally and ethically.

Just ask anyone you know if they ever agreed to the hidden use and sale of sensitive personal information about their minds and bodies by corporations or “research” businesses for analytics, sales, research or any other use. The answer is “no.”

Americans have very strong individual rights to health information privacy, i.e., to control the use of their most sensitive personal information. If US citizens have any “right to privacy,” that right has always applied to sensitive personal health information. This was very clear for our paper medical records and is embodied in the Hippocratic Oath as the requirement to obtain informed consent before disclosing patient information (with rare exceptions).

The IPO filing by IMS Health Holdings at the SEC exposed the vast number of hidden health data sellers and buyers. Buying, aggregating, and selling the nation’s health data is an “unfair and deceptive” trade practice. (Read more of Dr. Peel’s comments on the IMS filing here.)

Does the public know or expect that IMS (and the 100’s of thousands of other hidden health data mining companies) buys and aggregates sensitive “prescription and promotional” records, “electronic medical records,” “claims data,” and “social media” to create “comprehensive,” “longitudinal” health records on “400 million” patients? Or that IMS buys “proprietary data sourced from over 100,000 data suppliers covering over 780,000 data feeds globally”? Again, the answer is “no.”

Given the massive hidden theft, sale, and misuse of the nation’s health information how can any physician, hospital, or health data holder represent that our personal health data is private, secure, or confidential?

deb

Company That Knows What Drugs Everyone Takes Going Public

Nearly every time you fill out a prescription, your pharmacy sells details of the transaction to outside companies which compile and analyze the information to resell to others. The data includes age and gender of the patient, the name, address and contact details of their doctor, and details about the prescription.

A 60-year-old company little known by the public, IMS Health, is leading the way in gathering this data. They say they have assembled “85% of the world’s prescriptions by sales revenue and approximately 400 million comprehensive, longitudinal, anonymous patient records.”

IMS Health sells data and reports to all the top 100 worldwide global pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, as well as consulting firms, advertising agencies, government bodies and financial firms. In a January 2nd filing to the Security and Exchange Commission announcing an upcoming IPO, IMS said it processes data from more 45 billion healthcare transactions annually (more than six for each human on earth on average) and collects information from more than 780,000 different streams of data worldwide.

Deborah Peel, a Freudian psychoanalyst who founded Patient Privacy Rights in Austin, Texas, has long been concerned about corporate gathering of medical records.

“I’ve spent 35 years or more listening to how people have been harmed because their records went somewhere they didn’t expect,” she says. “It got to employers who either fired them or demoted them or used the information to destroy their reputation.”

“It’s just not right. I saw massive discrimination in the paper age. Exponential isn’t even a big enough word for how far and how much the data is going to be used in the information age,” she continued. “If personal health data ‘belongs’ to anyone, surely it belongs to the individual, not to any corporation that handles, stores, or transmits that information.”

To view the full article please visit: Company That Knows What Drugs Everyone Takes Going Public

IMS Health Files for IPO – Is It Legal?

On January 2nd, IMS Health Holdings announced it will sell stock on the New York Stock Exchange. IMS joins other major NYSE-listed corporations that derive significant revenue from selling sensitive personal health data, including General Electric, IBM, United Health Group, CVS Caremark, Medco Health Solutions, Express Scripts, and Quest Diagnostics.

  • IMS buys and aggregates sensitive “prescription and promotional” records, “electronic medical records,” “claims data,” “social media” and more to create “comprehensive,” “longitudinal” health records on “400 million” patients.
  • All purchases and subsequent sales of personal health records are hidden from patients.  Patients are not asked for informed consent or given meaningful notice.
  • IMS Health Holdings sells health data to “5,000 clients,” including the US Government.
  • Despite claims that the data sold is “anonymous”, computer science has long established that re-identification is easy.
  • See brief 3-page paper by Narayanan and Shmatikov at: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~shmat/shmat_cacm10.pdf)
  • See Prof. Sweeney’s paper on re-identifying patient data sold by states like WA at: http://thedatamap.org/risks.html
  • “Our solutions, which are designed to provide our clients access to our deep healthcare-specific subject matter expertise, take various forms, including information, tailored analytics, subscription software and expert services.” (from IMS Health Holding’s SEC filing)

 

Quotes from IMS Health Holding’s SEC filing:   “We have one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of healthcare information in the world, spanning sales, prescription and promotional data, medical claims, electronic medical records and social media. Our scaled and growing data set, containing over 10 petabytes of unique data, includes over 85% of the world’s prescriptions by sales revenue and approximately 400 million comprehensive, longitudinal, anonymous patient records.”   IMS buys “proprietary data sourced from over 100,000 data suppliers covering over 780,000 data feeds globally.”

How can this business model be legal?  How can companies decide that US citizens’ personal health data is “proprietary data,” a corporate asset, and sell it?  If personal health data ‘belongs’ to anyone, surely it belongs to the individual, not to any corporation that handles, stores, or transmits that information.

Americans’ strongest rights to control personal information are our rights to control personal health information. We have constitutional rights to health information privacy which are not trumped by the 2001 elimination of the right of consent from HIPAA (see: http://patientprivacyrights.org/truth-hipaa/ ). HIPAA is the “floor” for privacy rights, not the ceiling. Strong state and federal laws, and medical ethics require consent before patient data is used or disclosed. 10 state constitutions grant residents a right to privacy, and other states constitutions have been interpreted as giving residents a right to privacy (like TX).

Surely FTC would regard the statement filed with the SEC as evidence of unfair and deceptive trade practices. US patients’ health data is being unfairly and deceptively bought and sold.  Can the SEC deny IMS Health the opportunity to offer an IPO, since its business model is predicated on hidden purchase and sale of Americans’ personal health data?

If we can’t control the use and sale of our most sensitive personal information, data about our minds and bodies, isn’t our right to privacy worthless?

deb

To view the full article published in Modern Healthcare visit:  IMS Health Files for IPO

 

ACP Supports Creating National Rx Drug Monitoring Database

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
 
The American College of Physicians supports the development of a national prescription drug monitoring program, which would create a single database that physicians and pharmacies could electronically review before prescribing controlled substances, according to a position paper, CBS News reports. The paper was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine on Monday (Jaslow, CBS News, 12/9).

 

A new national drug data base will extend the failed “War on Drugs”, criminalize millions more, increase patients’ reluctance to use controlled substances, and NOT improve treatment for addiction. US prescriptions are already collected and sold daily by prescription data aggregators like IMS Health, Merck Medco, SureScripts, etc., etc. These businesses all sell the nation’s prescription data to any willing buyers.Meanwhile neither physicians nor patients can get electronic copies of prescription data to improve care.Who should health technology benefit? Patients or corporations?

Why not use patients’ prescription data, already being collected by the hidden data aggregation industry, to improve patient health?

Why not use technology to strengthen the patient-physician relationship and to ensure effective diagnosis and treatment?

For example, here is one way technology could be re-designed to help patients:

Anytime a patient gets a controlled substance prescription, existing systems could automatically search for any prior controlled substance prescriptions the patient received in the last month. If a second or third prescription is found, the physician(s) and patient could be automatically notified and resolve together whether it should be filled or not—and how best to treat the patient’s symptoms

Technology should give patients and doctors they data they need for effective TREATMENT. It’s sad that such a prominent physician group supports giving law enforcement automatic access to every controlled substance prescription in the US. Law enforcement should only be able to access such sensitive patient data AFTER someone has committed a crime or with a judge’s approval.

Why open ALL prescriptions to law enforcement surveillance when the vast majority of patients taking controlled substances are not criminals?

Addiction is NOT a crime, it’s a very treatable medical illness.

deb

 

Re: Car X.O. cares about health

In response to the Healthcare IT News article: Car X.O. cares about health

This sounds like a bad joke: your new Ford car’s “SYNC” technology monitors your stress, blood sugars, blood pressure, gives you allergy alerts while tracking your behavior behind the wheel and how distracted you are. But it’s no joke, it’s in 5 million cars.
According to Ford:

  • “There’s a strong business case to explore health options”
  • “consumers are on the road more than ever”
  • “Drivers could manage their health while in motion, said Strumolo, or more likely while at a red light.”
  • “Ford has forged partnerships with Healthrageous Microsoft, Medtronic, IMS, WellDoc and others.”

What business case? How does tracking your health give Ford and health-monitoring technologies a way to make money?

Answer: selling your health data, most likely to auto insurers, health insurers, life insurers, and employers like trucking companies and those who employ drivers.

It would be great for us to have this kind of information about our bodies and minds so we can act to improve our health or share it with our doctors: instead, it’s sold to discriminate against us.

Surveillance and collection of the nation’s health data is a growth industry worth hundreds of billions in annual revenue to corporate America—-but what value do we get from that?

But state lawmakers can fix the broken HIPAA Privacy Rule and require meaningful, informed consent before EVERY use or collection of our health information—-we don’t have to wait for Congress. We can fix this in our home states.