Re: The Internet is a surveillance state

In response to the CNN article by Bruce Schneier: The Internet is a surveillance state

Bruce Schneier is wrong. Privacy is not over — the public is just now learning how invasive Internet technology, tech corporations, and government really are, and that they ACT to protect and maintain the US surveillance economy. When enough citizens tell Congress and the President to stop, this privacy disaster will stop.

The public is just beginning to WAKE UP. Today is the start of privacy in the Digital Age in the US, not the end.

It’s a lie that people happily give up privacy for “targeted ads” — tech giants like Google, Facebook, etc. have PREVENTED us from having apps and tools that enable privacy (ie, our right TO control personal information online). We have NO choices because government and the data mining industry have prevented us from having meaningful choices.

Signs of intelligent life in the Universe:

  • Attend or watch the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy (its free). The EU Data Protection Supervisor will keynote and so will the US Chief Technology Officer—-the stark differences between US and EU data protections will be discussed—register at: http://www.healthprivacysummit.org/d/vcq3vz/4W
  • SnapChat—millions of free downloads of an app that shows people want technology that gives THEM control over their data: single use of info (a picture in this case) and the ability to delete info. See: http://patientprivacyrights.org/2013/02/snapchat-and-the-erasable-future-of-social-media/
  • A recent Pew Research Center study found smartphone users are taking action to protect their privacy:
  • The default for Microsoft’s Windows 8 browser is ‘Do Not Track’
    • Microsoft’s Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch said a recent company study of computer users in the United States and Europe concluded that 75 percent wanted Microsoft to turn on the Do Not Track mechanism. “Consumers want and expect strong privacy protection to be built into Microsoft products and services.”
    • See more in the New York Times article: Do Not Track? Advertisers Say ‘Don’t Tread on Us’

DONATE to help Latanya Sweeney and Patient Privacy Rights build a health data map—-we MUST prove that thousands of hidden data users are stealing, using , and selling our personal health data: http://patientprivacyrights.org/donate/

SEE Latanya describe thedataMap at: http://patientprivacyrights.org/thedatamap/
This is the beginning of privacy, the war has just begun.

Re: PNAS study on predicting human behavior using digital records

Picture a box with 2,000 or 10,000 puzzle pieces inside—any one puzzle piece reveals nothing about the picture. But when all the pieces are assembled, an incredibly detailed picture FULL of information is created.

The data mining industry—including Google, Facebook, Acxiom and thousands more unknown corporations and foreign businesses—assembles the puzzle of who we are from thousands of bits of data we leave online. They know FAR MORE than anyone on Earth knows about each of us—more than what our partners, our moms and dads, our best friends, our psychoanalysts, or our children know about us.

The UK study shows how easy it is for hidden data mining companies to intimately know us (and sell) WHO WE ARE.

Most Americans are not aware of the ‘surveillance economy’ or that data miners can easily collect intimate psychological and physical/health profiles of everyone from online data.

The study:

  • “demonstrates the degree to which relatively basic digital records of human behavior can be used to automatically and accurately estimate a wide range of personal attributes that people would typically assume to be private”
  • “is based on Facebook Likes, a mechanism used by Facebook users to express their positive association with (or “Like”) online content, such as photos, friends’ status updates, Facebook pages of products, sports, musicians, books, restaurants, or popular Web sites”
  • correctly discriminates between:
    • homosexual and heterosexual men in 88% of cases
    • African Americans and Caucasian Americans in 95% of cases
    • between Democrat and Republican in 85% of cases
    • For the personality trait “Openness,” prediction accuracy is close to the test–retest accuracy of a standard personality test

The “surveillance economy” is why the US needs FAR STRONGER LAWS at the very least to prevent the hidden collection, use, and sale of health data, including everything about our minds and bodies, unless we give meaningful informed consent.

This urgent topic, ie whether the US should adopt strong data privacy and security protections like the EU—will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy June 5-6 in DC (it’s free to attend and will also be live-streamed). Register at: www.healthprivacysummit.org

Putting Health IT on the Path to Success

“The promise of health information technology (HIT) is comprehensive electronic patient records when and where needed, leading to improved quality of care at reduced cost. However, physician experience and other available evidence suggest that this promise is largely unfulfilled.

Comprehensive records require more than having every physician and hospital use an electronic health record (EHR) system. There must also be an effective, efficient, and trustworthy mechanism for health information exchange (HIE) to aggregate each patient’s scattered records into a complete whole when needed. This mechanism must also be accurate and reliable, protect patient privacy, and ensure that medical record access is transparent and accountable to patients.”

*Subscription needed to see full article.

Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

You can read more of the Wall Street Journal debate between Joel R. Reidenberg (Yes) & Thomas H. Davenport (No) here: Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

This urgent issue will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy in Washington, DC on June 5-6, 2013 at Georgetown Law Center.

The opening keynote will be Peter Hustinx, the EU Data Protection Supervisor: A health check on data privacy”

Register to attend at www.healthprivacysummit.org .

Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

View the full article at Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

This urgent issue will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy in Washington, DC on June 5-6, 2013 at Georgetown Law Center.

The opening keynote will be Peter Hustinx, the EU Data Protection Supervisor. He will speak on “A health check on data privacy?”

Register to attend at www.healthprivacysummit.org . Later we will post a link to watch via live-streaming video.

HIPAA Omnibus: Gaps In Privacy? — Interview with Deborah C. Peel, MD

Although the HIPAA Omnibus Rule is a step in the right direction for protecting health information, the regulation still leaves large privacy gaps, says patient advocate Deborah Peel, M.D.

HIPAA Omnibus finally affirmed that states can pass laws that are tougher than HIPAA, and that’s really good news because HIPAA is so full of flaws and defects that we are concerned that what is being built and funded will not be trusted by the pubic,” Peel says in an interview with HealthcareInfoSecurity during the 2013 HIMSS Conference.

Listen to this interview and read the full article here.

CommonWell Is a Shame and a Missed Opportunity

This is a story about how major data holders are moving to consolidate THEIR control over the collection and use of our personal health information.

Instead of building electronic health systems that enable us to decide who can see and use our health data, we are locked out and have no way to know who is using our data or what it’s used for.

-Deborah Peel

From The Health Care Blog article: CommonWell Is a Shame and a Missed Opportunity

“The big news at HIMSS13 was the unveiling of CommonWell (Cerner, McKesson, Allscripts, athenahealth, Greenway and RelayHealth) to “get the ball rolling” on data exchange across disparate technologies. The shame is that another program with opaque governance by the largest incumbents in health IT is being passed off as progress. The missed opportunity is to answer the call for patient engagement and the frustrations of physicians with EHRs and reverse the institutional control over the physician-patient relationship. Physicians take an oath to put their patient’s interest above all others while in reality we are manipulated to participate in massive amounts of unwarranted care.

There’s a link between healthcare costs and health IT. The past months have seen frustration with this manipulation by industry hit the public media like never before. Early this year, National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Farzad Mostashari, MD, called for “moral and right” action on the part of some EHR vendors, particularly when it comes to data lock-in and pricing transparency. On February 19, a front page article in the New York Times exposed the tactics of some of the founding members of CommonWell in grabbing much of the $19 Billion of health IT incentives while consolidating the industry and locking out startups and innovators. That same week, Time magazine’s cover story is a special report on health care costs and analyzes how the US wastes $750 Billion a year and what that means to patients. To round things out, the March issue of Health Affairs, published a survey showing that “the average physician would lose $43,743 over five years” as a result of EHR adoption while the financial benefits go to the vendors and the larger institutions…”

Dr. Peel at Authors’ Roundtable at HIMSS 2013

Dr. Deborah Peel, PPR Founder & Chair, will join her co-authors to talk about pressing privacy issues raised in HIMSS’s just released book, Information Privacy in the Evolving Healthcare Environment. As a co-author, Dr. Peel’s contributing chapter discusses patients’ rights to privacy and consent and outlines the auditable criteria of PPR’s Trust Framework, which includes 15 clear principles to ensure meaningful consent within all electronic systems.

Purchase the book here.

Restoring patient control over PHI will be a key topic discussed, with additional focus on the technologies and laws needed to address the gaps and flaws in the Omnibus Privacy Rule.

Date: Tuesday, March 5, 2013
Time: 11:00 AM CT
Where:
HIMSS 2013 Annual Conference and Exhibition
Room 213
New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center
900 Convention Center Boulevard
New Orleans, Louisiana

An advocate for patients’ rights to health privacy since 2004, when she formed PPR, Dr. Peel has led the charge for more stringent data privacy and security protections, as well as tough new enforcement and penalties for violations that were included in the January 2013 release of the Omnibus Privacy Rule.

Data Protection Laws, an Ocean Apart

American citizens are like just like EU citizens: they want the same strong rights to control personal information online, especially health information.

See the letter Patient Privacy Rights and other NGOs signed supporting the EU’s tough requirements for data protection.  The letter urges the US government policy makers to support the same tough data protections for US citizens, also embodied in the protections President Obama laid out in the “Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights”.

Unfortunately, the “Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights” exempts all health data, leaving the flawed HIPAA Privacy Rule that eliminates our control over personal health data in effect. The 563 page Omnibus Privacy Rules adds strong data security protections and stronger enforcement of violations for some health data holders and users, but not all. But it does not restore patients’ rights to consent before personal health information is accessed or used, even though the right to control health information has been the law of land for centuries and is the key ethic in the Hippocratic Oath (requires doctors to keep information private and not share it without consent).

US citizens will not trust their physicians or electronic health systems unless they control who can see and use their records, from diagnoses to DNA to prescriptions.

Article: Big brother to log your drinking habits and waist size as GPs are forced to hand over confidential records

To view the full article written by Jack Doyle, please visit: Big brother to log your drinking habits and waist size as GPs are forced to hand over confidential records

The UK government proposes to collect citizens’ health data in a “giant information bank”.  “A document outlining the scheme even raises the prospect of clinical data being passed on or sold to third parties”.

Quotes:

  • -Doctors will be forced to hand over sensitive information about patients as part of a new programme called Everyone Counts.
  • -The files will be stored in a giant information bank that privacy campaigners say represents the  ‘biggest data grab in NHS history’.
  • -Ross Anderson, professor of security engineering at Cambridge University, said: ‘Under these proposals, medical confidentiality is, in effect, dead and there is currently nobody standing in the way.’

David Cameron was criticized in the Guardian in 2011 when he first announced similar plans for collecting all citizens health data to:

  • -“encourage NHS ties with industry and fuel innovation, including £180m catalyst fund”
  • -encourage “collaboration between the health service and the life sciences industry”
  • -“make it easier for drug companies to run clinical trials in hospitals and to benefit from the NHS’s vast collection of patient data”.

The tens or hundreds of billions generated annually by sales of American citizens’ electronic health information are an attractive model for the UK and EU given the dire economic situation in the EU. It’s hard to know how large the market for health data is or how health data is used without a data map. See Professor Sweeney explain theDataMap research project at: http://tiny.cc/etyxrw

Americans can’t control who sees or uses their health data. Will UK citizens suffer the same fate?