CVS imposes health penalty if workers’ body weight is not reported or they don’t quit smoking

To view the full article, please visit CVS imposes health penalty if workers’ body weight is not reported or they don’t quit smoking.

CVS has instated a very invasive new policy of charging workers a hefty $600 dollar a year fine if they do not disclose sensitive health information to the company’s benefits firm. According to the article, “Under the new policy, nearly 200,000 CVS employees who obtain health insurance through the company will have to report their weight, blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol to WebMD Health Services Group, which provides benefits support to CVS.” However, if employees refuse, they will be charged an extra $50 a month in health insurance costs.

Patient Privacy Rights’ Dr. Deborah Peel tells the public, “‘This is an incredibly coercive and invasive thing to ask employees to do,’…’Rising healthcare costs are killing the economy, and businesses are terrified, Now, we’re all in this terrible situation where employers are desperate to get rid of workers who have costly health conditions, like obesity and diabetes.'”

To learn more about this issue, please visit our Health Privacy Summit Website and register for the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy.

Re: Your Online Attention, Bought in an Instant

Natasha Singer unearths more about the instantaneous selling of intimately detailed profiles about Americans in her article in The New York Times: Your Online Attention, Bought in an Instant

Best case: We get more ‘targeted’ ads. We supposedly want personalized ads so badly that we willingly give up deeply intimate portraits about who we are to the hidden data mining industry forever. Really? When did we ever have ANY meaningful choice about who collects and sells our most intimate personal information? See Duhigg’s NYTimes story.

Worst case: Hidden, technology enabled discrimination prevents us from getting jobs and destroys our reputations before anyone will meet with us. Companies like Rubicon literally know more about us than our partners, our mothers or fathers, our best friends, our children or our psychoanalysts. This information is used to harm us—-read Prof Sweeney’s paper on how ads like “YOUR NAME, arrested?” pop up next to the names of African-Americans but NOT next to Anglo-sounding names. What happens when future employers see ads like that when searching for information about you online? Read her paper here.

HELP FIX THIS PRIVACY DISASTER
HELP BUILD a map that tracks all hidden users and sellers of our sensitive health information.
DONATE to the Harvard/Patient Privacy Rights’ research project at: https://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/6402/donate_page/donate-to-thedatamap

European citizens have far stronger protections for their sensitive health and personal data than US citizens.
Learn why and learn about solutions to strengthen US data protections. Register for free to attend the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy June 5-6 in DC: www.healthprivacysummit.org

Re: The Internet is a surveillance state

In response to the CNN article by Bruce Schneier: The Internet is a surveillance state

Bruce Schneier is wrong. Privacy is not over — the public is just now learning how invasive Internet technology, tech corporations, and government really are, and that they ACT to protect and maintain the US surveillance economy. When enough citizens tell Congress and the President to stop, this privacy disaster will stop.

The public is just beginning to WAKE UP. Today is the start of privacy in the Digital Age in the US, not the end.

It’s a lie that people happily give up privacy for “targeted ads” — tech giants like Google, Facebook, etc. have PREVENTED us from having apps and tools that enable privacy (ie, our right TO control personal information online). We have NO choices because government and the data mining industry have prevented us from having meaningful choices.

Signs of intelligent life in the Universe:

  • Attend or watch the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy (its free). The EU Data Protection Supervisor will keynote and so will the US Chief Technology Officer—-the stark differences between US and EU data protections will be discussed—register at: http://www.healthprivacysummit.org/d/vcq3vz/4W
  • SnapChat—millions of free downloads of an app that shows people want technology that gives THEM control over their data: single use of info (a picture in this case) and the ability to delete info. See: http://patientprivacyrights.org/2013/02/snapchat-and-the-erasable-future-of-social-media/
  • A recent Pew Research Center study found smartphone users are taking action to protect their privacy:
  • The default for Microsoft’s Windows 8 browser is ‘Do Not Track’
    • Microsoft’s Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch said a recent company study of computer users in the United States and Europe concluded that 75 percent wanted Microsoft to turn on the Do Not Track mechanism. “Consumers want and expect strong privacy protection to be built into Microsoft products and services.”
    • See more in the New York Times article: Do Not Track? Advertisers Say ‘Don’t Tread on Us’

DONATE to help Latanya Sweeney and Patient Privacy Rights build a health data map—-we MUST prove that thousands of hidden data users are stealing, using , and selling our personal health data: http://patientprivacyrights.org/donate/

SEE Latanya describe thedataMap at: http://patientprivacyrights.org/thedatamap/
This is the beginning of privacy, the war has just begun.

Health IT Gurus predict the Next Big App

To view the full article, please visit Health IT Gurus predict the Next Big App.

“Mobile healthcare apps are multiplying fast and putting a vast array of new tools in the hands of patients and the providers who deliver their care. The pace and scope of innovation makes it hard to imagine what app developers will create next. So we put the question to some of the thinkers in the best position to know what’s needed and what’s possible.”

Here are a few key quotes from the article:

Dr. Deborah Peel, founder of Patient Privacy Rights Foundation, a privacy advocacy organization:

“People want control of their information. They want to be able to decide who sees it and make it go away. And so I think that the next big thing in healthcare is going to be that kind of control for patients over their information.”

Dr. Farzad Mostashari, head of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at HHS:

“We are going to be in an era where everyone is going to be looking to improve health and healthcare at lower cost. And we are going to be looking at every underutilized resource in healthcare. And the greatest, the most underutilized resource in healthcare is the patient and their family members…”

Re: PNAS study on predicting human behavior using digital records

Picture a box with 2,000 or 10,000 puzzle pieces inside—any one puzzle piece reveals nothing about the picture. But when all the pieces are assembled, an incredibly detailed picture FULL of information is created.

The data mining industry—including Google, Facebook, Acxiom and thousands more unknown corporations and foreign businesses—assembles the puzzle of who we are from thousands of bits of data we leave online. They know FAR MORE than anyone on Earth knows about each of us—more than what our partners, our moms and dads, our best friends, our psychoanalysts, or our children know about us.

The UK study shows how easy it is for hidden data mining companies to intimately know us (and sell) WHO WE ARE.

Most Americans are not aware of the ‘surveillance economy’ or that data miners can easily collect intimate psychological and physical/health profiles of everyone from online data.

The study:

  • “demonstrates the degree to which relatively basic digital records of human behavior can be used to automatically and accurately estimate a wide range of personal attributes that people would typically assume to be private”
  • “is based on Facebook Likes, a mechanism used by Facebook users to express their positive association with (or “Like”) online content, such as photos, friends’ status updates, Facebook pages of products, sports, musicians, books, restaurants, or popular Web sites”
  • correctly discriminates between:
    • homosexual and heterosexual men in 88% of cases
    • African Americans and Caucasian Americans in 95% of cases
    • between Democrat and Republican in 85% of cases
    • For the personality trait “Openness,” prediction accuracy is close to the test–retest accuracy of a standard personality test

The “surveillance economy” is why the US needs FAR STRONGER LAWS at the very least to prevent the hidden collection, use, and sale of health data, including everything about our minds and bodies, unless we give meaningful informed consent.

This urgent topic, ie whether the US should adopt strong data privacy and security protections like the EU—will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy June 5-6 in DC (it’s free to attend and will also be live-streamed). Register at: www.healthprivacysummit.org

Putting Health IT on the Path to Success

“The promise of health information technology (HIT) is comprehensive electronic patient records when and where needed, leading to improved quality of care at reduced cost. However, physician experience and other available evidence suggest that this promise is largely unfulfilled.

Comprehensive records require more than having every physician and hospital use an electronic health record (EHR) system. There must also be an effective, efficient, and trustworthy mechanism for health information exchange (HIE) to aggregate each patient’s scattered records into a complete whole when needed. This mechanism must also be accurate and reliable, protect patient privacy, and ensure that medical record access is transparent and accountable to patients.”

*Subscription needed to see full article.

Privacy Piracy Interview with PPR Founder

PRIVACY PIRACY HOST, MARI FRANK, ESQ. INTERVIEWS
DEBORAH PEEL, MARCH 11TH, 2013

On Monday, March 11th, 2013 Deborah C. Peel, MD, founder & chair of Patient Privacy Rights, was interviewed on Privacy Piracy with Mari Frank.

Among the topics of discussion were:

  1. The current state of Health Privacy
  2. How can individuals help to save and strengthen health privacy rights?
  3. What is the focus of the third International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy?

Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

You can read more of the Wall Street Journal debate between Joel R. Reidenberg (Yes) & Thomas H. Davenport (No) here: Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

This urgent issue will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy in Washington, DC on June 5-6, 2013 at Georgetown Law Center.

The opening keynote will be Peter Hustinx, the EU Data Protection Supervisor: A health check on data privacy”

Register to attend at www.healthprivacysummit.org .

UPMC, Oracle to help with ID management

To view the article, please visit UPMC, Oracle to help with ID management.

UPMC revealed plans on Thursday to collaborate with Oracle in the development of cloud-based identity management technology to be utilized by small to mid-sized healthcare providers.

According to the article, “CloudConnect Health IT will enable healthcare users to easily manage computer accounts, including adding, modifying and terminating a user’s computer access, officials say. They’ll also help providers manage access based on the user’s job responsibility and provide self-service tools for retrieving forgotten passwords and unlocking accounts, as well as offer comprehensive management reporting.”

This poses a problem because, as Adrian Gropper, MD, points out “Proprietary identity systems risk being coercive of the patient to the extent that they allow aggregation of a patient’s records across multiple institutions without informed patient consent. Voluntary ID systems can be created that are not coercive while still offering the value of global uniqueness.”

Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

View the full article at Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

This urgent issue will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy in Washington, DC on June 5-6, 2013 at Georgetown Law Center.

The opening keynote will be Peter Hustinx, the EU Data Protection Supervisor. He will speak on “A health check on data privacy?”

Register to attend at www.healthprivacysummit.org . Later we will post a link to watch via live-streaming video.