Prescription drug database bill stalls in Pa. House

To view the full article, please visit: Prescription drug database bill stalls in Pa. House

“A bill that would create a prescription drug database intended to help law enforcement nab doctor-shoppers and pill mills hit a hurdle Wednesday in the state House.”

Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up

“Many technology experts are blaming the software behind Healthcare.gov for all the problems Americans have encountered while trying to sign up for health insurance in accordance with the Affordable Care Act.”

This interesting article explores what is wrong and what is right about healthcare.gov. To view the full article, please visit Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up.

Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

To view the full article, please visit: Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

“…At the HIMSS Media/Healthcare IT News Privacy and Security Forum in Boston, patient privacy advocate Deborah Peel, MD, of Patient Privacy Rights, and UPMC Insurance Services Division Chief AnalyticsOfficer Pamela Peele took the stage to debate the highly-contested issue of whether patients should have full consent over how and with whom their personal health information records are shared.”

Key quotes from Dr. Peel:

“Forty to 50 million people a year do one of three things: avoid or delay diagnosis for critical conditions like cancer, depression and sexually transmitted diseases, or they hide information,” said Peel. “There’s the economic impact of having a system that people don’t trust.”

“He found that only a whopping 1 percent of the public would ever agree to unfettered research use of their data. Even with de-identified data, only 19 percent would agree to the use of their data for research without consent,” said Peel. “On the other hand, when people are asked if they want to participate or have their data used with consent, the public is very altruistic, so we get something very different fuller information, more complete information when the public knows what you’re doing with it and they support the project.”

 

HHS Site Aims To Educate About Health Information Exchange

“On Tuesday, HHS launched a website to help health care providers educate their patients on making informed decisions about health information exchange, The Hill‘s “Healthwatch” reports.”

“Deborah Peel — founder and chair of the not-for-profit Patient Privacy Rights — called HHS’ educational efforts flawed.”

She suggested that HHS instead should have:

  • Mentioned patients’ “fundamental right to health information privacy” in model notices for HIPAA compliance released this week; and
  • Informed patients of their right to a complete list of entities who have accessed their personal health information in electronic health records (FierceHealthIT, 9/17).”

For more information, please visit: HHS Site Aims To Educate About Health Information Exchange

Trust must be mutual for patient engagement to work

“A recent study in the Journal of the American Informatics Association reports that nearly one in eight patients has withheld information from their healthcare providers due to security concerns. Moreover, most of the respondents were very concerned about the security of their information when it was being shared electronically or by fax. Just last week, advocacy organization Patient Privacy Rights sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services urging the agency to improve privacy protections of patients’ electronic health records, particularly in the cloud and in HIEs.”

Read more: Trust must be mutual for patient engagement to work – FierceEMR http://www.fierceemr.com/story/trust-must-be-mutual-patient-engagement-work/2013-09-18#ixzz2fRtzIBsV
Subscribe at FierceEMR

Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

To view the full article, please visit: Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

“The five entities joining the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles v. NSA lawsuit before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California are: Acorn Active Media, the Charity and Security Network, the National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center. They join an already diverse coalition of groups representing interests including gun rights, environmentalism, drug-policy reform, human rights, open-source technology, media reform and religious freedom.”

FTC Files Complaint Against LabMD for Failing to Protect Consumers’ Privacy

The public would be surprised how little thought or money healthcare businesses put into data security.  LabMD is probably just one of thousands of healthcare businesses that don’t encrypt patient data and whose employees who use file-sharing apps to download music, etc, exposing patient records online.

We need new laws that require businesses that hold health data to be audited to prove they protect it.

Shouldn’t businesses have to prove they use tough data security protections before they are allowed to handle sensitive health information?

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2013/08/labmd.shtm

Privacy Advocates Set Their Sights on the Wrong G-Men

In the wake of NSA revelations, key privacy advocates make the point that private corporations and the government are working to ensure total surveillance of all digital information about all 300 million Americans and lock in billions in corporate revenue from the sale of personal data and detailed digital profiles of everyone in the US.

Corporate and government collection, use, and sale of the nation’s personal data is opaque.  The author of the story below trashes several  privacy advocates and misrepresents their key points about the hidden ‘government-industrial complex’.  And he claims that “Individuals can choose not to use a particular social network, search engine or website.”  But individuals have no meaningful choices online. See the documentary: “Terms and Conditions May Apply”.

The lack of trust online and in all holders of personal data is why President Obama proposed the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights (CPBOR). Unfortunately the proposed data privacy protections in the CPBOR do not apply to the most sensitive data of all, health data.

Meanwhile,  the ‘government-industrial complex’ is destroying Americans’ most fundamental rights to privacy. The highest right of civilized man is the right to be ‘let alone’—which happens to be the foundation of Democracy.  Yet all we read about are the wonders of ‘big data’ and the need to collect and use personal data without meaningful informed consent. We can certainly use big data for innovation and benefits—but the public wants to be asked permission for all uses of data, especially for ‘research’ uses. Big data analytics is research.

  • See Westin’s research that shows only 1% of the public approves use of health data for research without consent. See more of his findings here.

Today US citizens have no control over their most sensitive personal information: health data from DNA to prescriptions records to diagnoses—-because privacy-destructive technologies and system architectures prevent us from exercising our rights to give meaningful informed consent before health data is collected, used, disclosed, or sold.

To view the full article, please visit: Privacy Advocates Set Their Sights on the Wrong G-Men

Enabling the Health Care Locavore

Here’s a great article written by PPR’s Chief Technical Officer, Dr. Adrian Gropper about “why hip replacement surgery costs 5-10 times as much in the US as in Belgium even though it’s the same implant… JAMA publish[ing] research and a superb editorial on the Views of US Physicians About Controlling Health Care Costs and CMS put[ting] out a request for public comment on whether physicians’ Medicare pay should be made public.”

To view the full article, please visit Enabling the Health Care Locavore on The Health Care Blog.

A Family Consents to a Medical Gift, 62 Years Later

Should researchers control the use of everyone’s genomes?

It’s time for a national debate about when and how our genetic information should be used.  The healthcare industry and government are planning that our genomes will soon be part of our electronic health records, so that sensitive data can be used without patient consent. The cost of sequencing a genome will soon drop below $1,000.

But the debate about who should control the use of this unique, personal information must be informed by knowing/tracking the hidden flows of genetic data.

The next phase of theDataMap should track the use, sale, and disclosure of genetic information: from hospitals, labs, and genomic sequencing companies to private biobanks, etc, etc.

We cannot weigh risks vs. benefits of open access to genetic data when the risks are unknown.