Security and Privacy of Patient Data Subject of Regulatory Hearing

Representatives of patients, providers, insurers and tech companies testify before federal panel yesterday at the HIT Policy Privacy & Security Tiger Team Virtual Hearing on Accounting for Disclosures.

“We believe it’s the patient’s right to have digital access that is real-time and online for accounting of disclosures,” said Dr. Deborah Peel, the head of Patient Privacy Rights, a group she founded in 2004. Patients “need and want the data for our own health. We need to have independent agents as advisors, independent decision-making tools, we need independence from the institutions and data holders that currently control our information. We need to have agents that represent us, not the interests of corporations,” she said.

“I think the day will come when people will understand that their health information is the most valuable personal information about them in the digital world and that it’s an asset that should be protected in the same way that they protect and control their financial information online,” Peel said.

To view the full article click Security and Privacy of Patient Data Subject of Regulatory Hearing

To view a PDF of the hearing click HIT Policy Privacy & Security Tiger Team Virtual Hearing on Accounting for Disclosures

 

Helmet cams raise privacy, liability concerns

“Every time Austin Fire Department Engine 20 rolls toward an emergency call, firefighter Andrzej Micyk straps on a bright yellow helmet to protect himself from heat and falling debris…and a tiny, high-definition video camera that captures…every move — from how he interacts with the public to what he does to gain control of an inferno.”

To view a video the Statesman published with this article, click here

To view the full article click here


Comments from Dr. Peel: “Other major national fire departments ban helmet cams. The Austin TX Fire Dept has no policy about personal helmet cams. The key problem for the public is firefighters often respond to medical emergencies. Should someone with a heart attack or suicide attempt end up on YouTube?”

“This story raises questions about citizens’ rights to health privacy that are similar to the problems that occur when hospital and emergency room employees use cell phones to take pictures of patients.” See recent example: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/woman-sues-hospital-sticker-prank-surgery/story?id=20204405

“In a different context, police cars use video cameras to document encounters with citizens who are potentially breaking the law. In this case, videos serve a very different purpose and protect both citizens and members of the police.”

 

Pairing patient privacy with health big data analytics

“Health privacy and security are often mentioned in tandem, but Deborah Peel, Founder and Chair of Patient Privacy Rights and Adrian Gropper, Chief Technology Officer of Patient Privacy Rights, took a different view in a recent Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT2) webcast.”

“The presentation, titled “Competing for Patient Trust and Data Privacy in the Age of Big Data” detailed a few of the nuances between patient data privacy and security and why privacy is so significant as healthcare organizations pull together huge data sets for health information exchange (HIE) and accountable care.”

To view the full article, please visit: Pairing patient privacy with health big data analytics

The webcast can be viewed at: Competing for Patient Trust and Data Privacy in the Age of Big Data Webinar

Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

To view the full article, please visit: Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

“The five entities joining the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles v. NSA lawsuit before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California are: Acorn Active Media, the Charity and Security Network, the National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center. They join an already diverse coalition of groups representing interests including gun rights, environmentalism, drug-policy reform, human rights, open-source technology, media reform and religious freedom.”

We want to hear from YOU! Tell us why you think health privacy is important.

Protecting health privacy isn’t just important for your own health and well-being, but what we do now affects future generations too. PPR cares deeply about protecting everyone’s privacy so that people are measured by who they are and what they are capable of, not their medical history.

Currently, there are no limits to the types of organizations that can gain access to sensitive information about you—employers, advertisers, insurers, you name it. It’s so important that we act now to preserve our right to privacy and regain control over our personal information. We believe it should always be up to you to decide what happens to your sensitive information—you should be able to know and control who sees it, where it goes, and why.

People say that privacy is a thing of the past in the Digital Age, but we disagree. In fact, we think people are starting to realize just how important privacy is and that it’s a right worth fighting for. That’s why we want to hear from you. Send us a video telling us why you think health privacy matters and join us in our efforts to protect it.*

Watch the video below to hear Dr. Peel talk about why health privacy is important to her (or click here to view it on YouTube).


*Please note that by sending a video, you are giving PPR permission to display the video on its website or social media pages. However, the video remains the sole property of the copyright holder. Any requests to remove or delete videos will be immediately honored.

What is Snowden’s Impact on Health IT?

To view the full article, please visit What is Snowden’s Impact on Health IT?

This is a highly interesting article about the effect of Edward Snowden’s actions on health IT. In the interview with PPR’s own Dr. Deborah Peel, the issues of privacy that our government is currently facing can also be applied to the healthcare industry. As Dr. Peel aptly states, “The Department of Health and Human Services claims its actions are justified to lower healthcare costs. These are obviously very different agencies collecting different kinds of very sensitive personal information, but both set up hidden, extremely intrusive surveillance systems that violate privacy rights and destroy trust in government.”

A key argument that Dr. Peel makes is “The benefits of technology can be reaped in all sectors of our economy without the harms if we restore/update our laws to assure privacy of personally identifiable information in electronic systems. Our ethics, principles, and fundamental rights should be applied to the uses of technology.”

Privacy Framework: A Practical Tool?

An interesting article about our Privacy Framework- to view the full article please visit Privacy Framework: A Practical Tool?

Some key quotes:

“The PPR Trust Framework is … designed to help organizations ensure that technology and IT systems align with the privacy requirements of critical importance to patients and reflect their legal and ethical rights to health information privacy,” Peel says.

“The framework was developed by a group within Patient Privacy Rights – the bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy – along with Microsoft and the consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, Peel says. It was developed, tested and validated on Microsoft’s HealthVault personal health record platform.”

“Ensuring the privacy of patient data is a key concern for any healthcare IT vendor,” says Sean Nolan, distinguished engineer, Microsoft HealthVault. “Microsoft as a company advocates for a more standardized federal approach to the privacy of data, and this is especially true for the HealthVault team. We believe that it takes a deep corporate commitment to the privacy of patient data in order to support initiatives such as the PPR Trust Framework.”