Experts Forecast Top Seven Trends in Healthcare Information Privacy for 2011

A panel of healthcare experts representing privacy, trends, technology, regulatory, data breach, and governance were asked to weigh in with their forecasts for 2011. These experts suggest that as health information exchanges take form, millions of patient records—soon to be available as digital files—will lead to potential unauthorized access, violation of new data breach laws and, more importantly, exposure to the threat of medical and financial identity theft.

These predictions are supported by the recent Ponemon Institute’s Benchmark Study on Patient Privacy and Data Security, published November 2010, which found that data breaches of patient information cost the healthcare industry $6 billion annually; protecting patient data is a low priority for hospitals; and the healthcare industry lags behind the recently enacted HITECH laws…

Industry-Wide Experts Share Their Opinions and Insight…

Dr. Deborah Peel, M.D., practicing physician and founder of Patient Privacy Rights; the nation’s health privacy watchdog

“2011 will be the year that Americans recognize they can’t control personal health information in health IT systems and data exchanges. Will 2011 be the year that data security and privacy are the top of the nation’s agenda? I hope so. The right to privacy is the essential right of individuals in vibrant Democracies. If we don’t do it right in healthcare, we won’t have any privacy in the Digital Age.”…

Insecurities Plague Electronic Health Care

Information security and privacy in the healthcare sector is an issue of growing importance but much remains to be done to address the various issues raised by healthcare consumers regarding privacy and security and the providers’ perspective of regulatory compliance.

Writing in the International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management, Ajit Appari and Eric Johnson of Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA, explain that the adoption of digital patient records, increased regulation, provider consolidation and the increasing need for information exchange between patients, providers and payers, all point towards the need for better information security. Without it patient privacy could be seriously compromised at great cost to individuals and to the standing of the healthcare industry.

Living Online: Privacy and Security Issues in a Digital Age

Our lives are increasingly lived online. A large number of Americans routinely exchange information in cyberspace for personal, business, and other purposes. What privacy and security issues present themselves in this relatively new and increasingly ubiquitous space? What particular privacy concerns might apply when specific entities, such as the government, hold or process our information? What particular considerations might apply when the information being transmitted is particularly sensitive, such as health care information or financial information? How do privacy, security, and information ownership concerns function when information is being exchanged on social networking sites?

The November 3, 2009 event featured a lunchtime keynote address by Christopher N. Olsen, the Assistant Director in the Division of Privacy and Identity Protection at the Federal Trade Commission.

A panel discussion was held from 1 – 2:30 pm and featured:

  • Moderator, Jeffrey Rosen, Professor of Law at George Washington University and Legal Affairs Editor for The New Republic
  • Deborah C. Peel, MD, Founder and Chair, Patient Privacy Rights; Chair, Coalition for Patient Privacy
  • Lillie Coney, Associate Director, Electronic Privacy Information Center; Coordinator, Privacy Coalition
  • Alan Davidson, Director of Public Policy, Google

Here is the Video of the Panel:

Tuesday, November 3, 2009
11:30 am – 2:30 pm
Center for American Progress
1333 H. Street NW, 10th Floor
Washington, DC 20005

Re-Identification. From Netflix to Health Records.

Today’s NY Times story points out the FACT that is very easy to re-identify supposedly “de-identified” information. Singer starts with how the Netflix “de-identified” data base was proven to be re-identifiable and moves on to describe Latanya Sweeney’s famous re-identification of the medical records of Gov Weld.

See the NY Times Article: When 2+2 Equals a Privacy Question