Health IT Gurus predict the Next Big App

To view the full article, please visit Health IT Gurus predict the Next Big App.

“Mobile healthcare apps are multiplying fast and putting a vast array of new tools in the hands of patients and the providers who deliver their care. The pace and scope of innovation makes it hard to imagine what app developers will create next. So we put the question to some of the thinkers in the best position to know what’s needed and what’s possible.”

Here are a few key quotes from the article:

Dr. Deborah Peel, founder of Patient Privacy Rights Foundation, a privacy advocacy organization:

“People want control of their information. They want to be able to decide who sees it and make it go away. And so I think that the next big thing in healthcare is going to be that kind of control for patients over their information.”

Dr. Farzad Mostashari, head of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at HHS:

“We are going to be in an era where everyone is going to be looking to improve health and healthcare at lower cost. And we are going to be looking at every underutilized resource in healthcare. And the greatest, the most underutilized resource in healthcare is the patient and their family members…”

Privacy Piracy Interview with PPR Founder

PRIVACY PIRACY HOST, MARI FRANK, ESQ. INTERVIEWS
DEBORAH PEEL, MARCH 11TH, 2013

On Monday, March 11th, 2013 Deborah C. Peel, MD, founder & chair of Patient Privacy Rights, was interviewed on Privacy Piracy with Mari Frank.

Among the topics of discussion were:

  1. The current state of Health Privacy
  2. How can individuals help to save and strengthen health privacy rights?
  3. What is the focus of the third International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy?

HIPAA Omnibus: Gaps In Privacy? — Interview with Deborah C. Peel, MD

Although the HIPAA Omnibus Rule is a step in the right direction for protecting health information, the regulation still leaves large privacy gaps, says patient advocate Deborah Peel, M.D.

HIPAA Omnibus finally affirmed that states can pass laws that are tougher than HIPAA, and that’s really good news because HIPAA is so full of flaws and defects that we are concerned that what is being built and funded will not be trusted by the pubic,” Peel says in an interview with HealthcareInfoSecurity during the 2013 HIMSS Conference.

Listen to this interview and read the full article here.

Re: Car X.O. cares about health

In response to the Healthcare IT News article: Car X.O. cares about health

This sounds like a bad joke: your new Ford car’s “SYNC” technology monitors your stress, blood sugars, blood pressure, gives you allergy alerts while tracking your behavior behind the wheel and how distracted you are. But it’s no joke, it’s in 5 million cars.
According to Ford:

  • “There’s a strong business case to explore health options”
  • “consumers are on the road more than ever”
  • “Drivers could manage their health while in motion, said Strumolo, or more likely while at a red light.”
  • “Ford has forged partnerships with Healthrageous Microsoft, Medtronic, IMS, WellDoc and others.”

What business case? How does tracking your health give Ford and health-monitoring technologies a way to make money?

Answer: selling your health data, most likely to auto insurers, health insurers, life insurers, and employers like trucking companies and those who employ drivers.

It would be great for us to have this kind of information about our bodies and minds so we can act to improve our health or share it with our doctors: instead, it’s sold to discriminate against us.

Surveillance and collection of the nation’s health data is a growth industry worth hundreds of billions in annual revenue to corporate America—-but what value do we get from that?

But state lawmakers can fix the broken HIPAA Privacy Rule and require meaningful, informed consent before EVERY use or collection of our health information—-we don’t have to wait for Congress. We can fix this in our home states.

Most U.S. Doctors Believe Patients Should Update Electronic Health Record, but Not Have Full Access to It, According to Accenture Eight-Country Surve

To view the full article, please visit Most U.S. Doctors Believe Patients Should Update Electronic Health Record, but Not Have Full Access to It, According to Accenture Eight-Country Survey.

According to a Harris Poll,  70% of doctors don’t “believe” patients should be able to get FULL copies of their electronic health records.

But patients have always had the right to copies of their paper medical records—it was just a hassle to get them.  HIPAA,  HITECH, and the Omnibus Privacy Rule all affirmed patients have the right to download copies of their electronic health information.

Do only 30% of doctors understand patients’ rights under the law?  MD Anderson Cancer Center has given patients FULL downloads of their electronic health records for years.

How the Insurer Knows You Just Stocked Up on Ice Cream and Beer

View the full article at How the Insurer Knows You Just Stocked Up on Ice Cream and Beer.

Your employer already has access to personal medical information such as how often you get check ups and whether you’re taking prescription mediation through your insurance carrier, but now some companies are beginning to monitor where you shop and what you eat.

Some key quotes from the article:

“…But companies also have started scrutinizing employees’ other behavior more discreetly. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina recently began buying spending data on more than 3 million people in its employer group plans. If someone, say, purchases plus-size clothing, the health plan could flag him for potential obesity—and then call or send mailings offering weight-loss solutions.”

“Some critics worry that the methods cross the line between protective and invasive—and could lead to job discrimination. ‘It’s a slippery-slope deal,’ says Dr. Deborah Peel, founder of Patient Privacy Rights, which advocates for medical-data confidentiality. She worries employers could conceivably make other conclusions about people who load up the cart with butter and sugar.”

“Analytics firms and health insurers say they obey medical-privacy regulations, and employers never see the staff’s personal health profiles but only an aggregate picture of their health needs and expected costs. And if the targeted approach feels too intrusive, employees can ask to be placed on the wellness program’s do-not-call list.”

Rekindling the patient ID debate

Unique patient identifiers pose enormous implications for patient control and privacy. Dr. Deborah Peel is quoted in this article explaining how detrimental UPIs will be for patient trust and safety. To view the full article, please visit Rekindling the patient ID debate.

Key Quotations:

“The idea of unique patient identifiers (UPIs) is not a concept extracted from the next dystopian novel. It could very well be reality in the not-so-distant future. The question remaining, however, is whether or not the benefits of such technology outweigh constitutional privacy and patient trust concerns.”

“Deborah Peel, MD, founder of Patient Privacy Rights, and a fierce opponent of UPIs, writes in a Jan. 23 Wall Street Journalarticle, ‘In the end, cutting out the patient will mean the erosion of patient trust. And the less we trust the system, the more patients will put health and life at risk to protect their privacy.’

Peel points to the present reality of patient health information – genetic tests, claims data and prescription records – already being sold and commercialized. ‘Universal healthcare IDs would only exacerbate such practices,’ she avers.”

Questions of Privacy

ModernHealthcare.com recently posted a great article about PPR’s Dr. Deborah Peel and her work.

A few key points from the article:

“In 2002, HHS redrafted the privacy rule of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, replacing its patient consent requirement for the sharing of most patient records with a new provision. The rewrite afforded ‘regulatory permission,’ according to the rule, for hospitals, physicians, insurance companies, pharmacies, claims clearinghouses and other HIPAA-covered entities to use and disclose patient data for treatment, payment and a long list of other healthcare operations without patient consent.”

“’Let’s face it,’ Peel says, ‘HHS is the agency that eliminated patient control over electronic medical records and has remained hostile to patients’ rights ever since.’”

“‘Where I’m coming from is, I’ve spent all this time in a profession with people being hurt,’ Peel says. ‘Starting in the 1970s, when I first let out my shingle, people came to me and said, if I paid you in cash, would you keep my records private. Now, we’ve got a situation where you don’t even know where all your records are. We don’t have a chain of custody for our data, or have a data map’ to track its location.”

Privacy and Health Care – Blog referencing PPR’s “The Case for Informed Consent”

The blog Emergent Chaos wrote an article urging for privacy in the mental health field as a means of minimizing the stigma associated with diagnosis.

Some key statistics pointed out in this post:

“First, between 13 and 17% of Americans admit in surveys to hiding health information in the current system. That’s probably a lower-bound, as we can expect some of the privacy sensitive population will decline to be surveyed, and some fraction of those who are surveyed may hide their information hiding. (It’s information-hiding all the way down.)

Secondly, 1 in 8 Americans (12.5%) put their health at risk because of privacy concerns, including avoiding their regular doctor, asking their doctor to record a different diagnosis, or avoiding tests.”

Clouds in healthcare should be viewed as ominous- Quotes from Dr. Deborah Peel

A recent article in FierceEMR written by Marla Durben Hirsch quotes Dr. Peel about the dangers of cloud technology being used in healthcare. Dr. Peel tells FierceEMR that “There’s a lot of ignorance regarding safety and privacy of these [cloud] technologies”.

Here are a few key quotes from the story:

“It’s surely no safe haven for patient information; to the contrary it is especially vulnerable to security breaches. A lot of EHR vendors that offer cloud-based EHR systems don’t take measures to keep patient data safe. Many of them don’t think they have to comply with HIPAA’s privacy and security rules, and many of their provider clients aren’t requiring their vendors to do so.” (Hirsch)

“Many providers have no idea where the vendor is hosting the providers’ patient data. It could be housed in a different state; or even outside of the country, leaving it even more vulnerable. ‘If the cloud vendor won’t tell you where the information is, walk out the door,’ Peel says.”

“Then there’s the problem of what happens to your data when your contract with the cloud vendor ends. Providers don’t pay attention to that when they sign their EHR contract, Peel warns.”

“‘The cloud can be a good place for health information if you have iron clad privacy and security protections,’ Peel says. ‘[But] people shouldn’t have to worry about their data wherever it’s held.'”