Your prescription history is their business

“A secretive, for-profit service called ScriptCheck keeps track of all your prescriptions, even those you pay for with cash. Life insurers pay for the data.”

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lazarus-20131022,0,1491023.column#ixzz2miu5cODJ

Five Public Interest Groups Underscore Opposition To Settlement In Google Privacy Suit

“Consumer Watchdog joined the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and three other public interest groups today in re-iterating their opposition to a proposed $8.5 million settlement in a class action suit against Google for privacy violations in the way it handled users’ search data because proposed recipients of settlement funds don’t represent the interests of the class.”

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1529279#ixzz2i1kPTbJt

Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up

“Many technology experts are blaming the software behind Healthcare.gov for all the problems Americans have encountered while trying to sign up for health insurance in accordance with the Affordable Care Act.”

This interesting article explores what is wrong and what is right about healthcare.gov. To view the full article, please visit Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up.

Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

To view the full article, please visit: Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

“…At the HIMSS Media/Healthcare IT News Privacy and Security Forum in Boston, patient privacy advocate Deborah Peel, MD, of Patient Privacy Rights, and UPMC Insurance Services Division Chief AnalyticsOfficer Pamela Peele took the stage to debate the highly-contested issue of whether patients should have full consent over how and with whom their personal health information records are shared.”

Key quotes from Dr. Peel:

“Forty to 50 million people a year do one of three things: avoid or delay diagnosis for critical conditions like cancer, depression and sexually transmitted diseases, or they hide information,” said Peel. “There’s the economic impact of having a system that people don’t trust.”

“He found that only a whopping 1 percent of the public would ever agree to unfettered research use of their data. Even with de-identified data, only 19 percent would agree to the use of their data for research without consent,” said Peel. “On the other hand, when people are asked if they want to participate or have their data used with consent, the public is very altruistic, so we get something very different fuller information, more complete information when the public knows what you’re doing with it and they support the project.”

 

Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

To view the full article, please visit: Five More Organizations Join Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance

“The five entities joining the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles v. NSA lawsuit before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California are: Acorn Active Media, the Charity and Security Network, the National Lawyers Guild, Patient Privacy Rights and The Shalom Center. They join an already diverse coalition of groups representing interests including gun rights, environmentalism, drug-policy reform, human rights, open-source technology, media reform and religious freedom.”

Privacy groups ask FTC to stop Facebook policy changes

“Half a dozen privacy groups have asked the Federal Trade Commission to stop Facebook from enacting changes to two of its governing documents… In addition to EPIC, CDD and Consumer Watchdog, representatives from Patient Privacy Rights, U.S. Public Interest Research Group and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse also signed the letter.”

To view the full article, please visit: Privacy groups ask FTC to stop Facebook policy changes

Health apps run into privacy snags

“The next time you use your smartphone to inquire about migraine symptoms or to check out how many calories were in that cheeseburger, there is a chance that information could be passed on to insurance and pharmaceuticals companies.

The top-20 health and wellness apps, including MapMyFitness, WebMD Health and iPeriod, are transmitting information to up to 70 third-party companies, according to Evidon, a web analytics and privacy firm”

If you are a subscriber to ft.com, you can view the full article at: Health apps run into privacy snags

FTC Files Complaint Against LabMD for Failing to Protect Consumers’ Privacy

The public would be surprised how little thought or money healthcare businesses put into data security.  LabMD is probably just one of thousands of healthcare businesses that don’t encrypt patient data and whose employees who use file-sharing apps to download music, etc, exposing patient records online.

We need new laws that require businesses that hold health data to be audited to prove they protect it.

Shouldn’t businesses have to prove they use tough data security protections before they are allowed to handle sensitive health information?

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2013/08/labmd.shtm

People Are Changing Their Internet Habits Now That They Know The NSA Is Watching

NSA leaks causing public to mistrust the entire  internet, not just cell phone providers. Quotes:

  • consumer concern about online privacy actually jumped from 48% to 57% between June and July
  • The %  of consumers who adjusted their browser settings and opted out of mobile tracking — jumped 12% and 7% respectively between the first quarter report and July.
  • > 60% of Internet users also reported they do not feel they have control over their personal information online, and 48% said they didn’t know how that information was being used

The lack of personal control over data online will also affect cloud service providers:

  • Cloud-computing industry experts have already estimated that because of the NSA’s surveillance of cloud providers–along with the government’s civil-liberties-trolling methods to get them to comply–more companies will move overseas.
  • ITIF has estimated that this will result in a loss of up to $35 billion for U.S. cloud providers over the next three years, while Forrester analyst James Staten puts the figure at $180 billion.

How will the public react when they find that US health data holders—-such as physicians, hospitals, labs, pharmacies, health data exchanges, insurers, mobile apps, etc, etc— use and sell sensitive personal health data?

To view the full article, please visit:

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3015860/people-are-changing-their-internet-habits-now-that-they-know-the-nsa-is-watching

States Review Rules After Patients Identified via Health Records

To view the full article, please visit States Review Rules After Patients Identified via Health Records.

Key Quotes from the Article:

  • -“Some U.S. states are reviewing their policies around the collection and sale of health information to ensure that some patients can’t be identified in publicly available databases of hospital records.”
  • -Bloomberg News, working with Harvard University professor Latanya Sweeney, reported on June 4 that some patients of Washington hospitals could be identified by name and have their conditions and procedures exposed when a database sold by the state for $50 is combined with news articles and other public information.
  • -The state probes are focused on whether privacy standards for health information should be tightened as data-mining technologies get more sophisticated and U.S. President Barack Obama’s health-care overhaul drives rapid growth in the amount of patient data being generated and shared.
  • -Sweeney’s goal of identifying patients is to show that threats to privacy exist in datasets that are widely distributed and fall outside HIPAA’s regulations.