Google to Sell Users’ Endorsements

The New York Times posted an article reminding us about the permanence of our digital footprints.  Those old posts are never forgotten and can now be used by Google to make a profit.

“Those long-forgotten posts on social networks, from the pasta someone photographed to the rant about her dentist, are forgotten no more. Social networks want to make them easier to find, and in some cases, to show them in ads.  Google on Friday announced that it would soon be able to show users’ names, photos, ratings and comments in ads across the Web, endorsing marketers’ products. Facebook already runs similar endorsement ads.”

“’People expect when they give information, it’s for a single use, the obvious one,’ said Dr. Deborah C. Peel, a psychoanalyst and founder of Patient Privacy Rights, an advocacy group. ‘That’s why the widening of something you place online makes people unhappy. It feels to them like a breach, a boundary violation.’”

“’We set our own boundaries,’” she added. ‘We don’t want them set by the government or Google or Facebook.’”

“Dr. Peel said the rise of new services like Snapchat, which features person-to-person messages that disappear after they are opened, showed how much people wanted more control over how their information was shared.”

To view the full article click here

We want to hear from YOU! Tell us why you think health privacy is important.

Protecting health privacy isn’t just important for your own health and well-being, but what we do now affects future generations too. PPR cares deeply about protecting everyone’s privacy so that people are measured by who they are and what they are capable of, not their medical history.

Currently, there are no limits to the types of organizations that can gain access to sensitive information about you—employers, advertisers, insurers, you name it. It’s so important that we act now to preserve our right to privacy and regain control over our personal information. We believe it should always be up to you to decide what happens to your sensitive information—you should be able to know and control who sees it, where it goes, and why.

People say that privacy is a thing of the past in the Digital Age, but we disagree. In fact, we think people are starting to realize just how important privacy is and that it’s a right worth fighting for. That’s why we want to hear from you. Send us a video telling us why you think health privacy matters and join us in our efforts to protect it.*

Watch the video below to hear Dr. Peel talk about why health privacy is important to her (or click here to view it on YouTube).


*Please note that by sending a video, you are giving PPR permission to display the video on its website or social media pages. However, the video remains the sole property of the copyright holder. Any requests to remove or delete videos will be immediately honored.

Putting Data In The Cloud? Retain Control

At the beginning of Stanley Kubrick’s epic, “2001: A Space Odyssey,” apes benefit from the use of technology, in the form of a club. By the end of the movie, however, humans are threatened by the technology used to help them survive in the stars, the artificial intelligence HAL.

In some ways, this technological arc — from tool to master — is an apt allegory for companies entering the cloud, Davi Ottenheimer, president of security consultancy Flying Penguin, plans to argue in his presentation at the B-Sides Security conference in Las Vegas next week. Firms seeking greater efficiency and more features may rely on the technology of a cloud provider, leaving themselves vulnerable to a single security incident.

In his presentation, Ottenheimer plans to draw illustrate the need a more secure approach to clouds using the themes from “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

“The central question for companies is, ‘Do you have control?’” Ottenheimer says. “The fight between the humans and HAL in a nutshell is the fight between the customers and the cloud provider. Humans reliance on the tools to survive in space is almost their undoing, and reliance on cloud services can similarly be a firm’s undoing.”