People Are Changing Their Internet Habits Now That They Know The NSA Is Watching

NSA leaks causing public to mistrust the entire  internet, not just cell phone providers. Quotes:

  • consumer concern about online privacy actually jumped from 48% to 57% between June and July
  • The %  of consumers who adjusted their browser settings and opted out of mobile tracking — jumped 12% and 7% respectively between the first quarter report and July.
  • > 60% of Internet users also reported they do not feel they have control over their personal information online, and 48% said they didn’t know how that information was being used

The lack of personal control over data online will also affect cloud service providers:

  • Cloud-computing industry experts have already estimated that because of the NSA’s surveillance of cloud providers–along with the government’s civil-liberties-trolling methods to get them to comply–more companies will move overseas.
  • ITIF has estimated that this will result in a loss of up to $35 billion for U.S. cloud providers over the next three years, while Forrester analyst James Staten puts the figure at $180 billion.

How will the public react when they find that US health data holders—-such as physicians, hospitals, labs, pharmacies, health data exchanges, insurers, mobile apps, etc, etc— use and sell sensitive personal health data?

To view the full article, please visit:

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3015860/people-are-changing-their-internet-habits-now-that-they-know-the-nsa-is-watching

UPMC, Oracle to help with ID management

To view the article, please visit UPMC, Oracle to help with ID management.

UPMC revealed plans on Thursday to collaborate with Oracle in the development of cloud-based identity management technology to be utilized by small to mid-sized healthcare providers.

According to the article, “CloudConnect Health IT will enable healthcare users to easily manage computer accounts, including adding, modifying and terminating a user’s computer access, officials say. They’ll also help providers manage access based on the user’s job responsibility and provide self-service tools for retrieving forgotten passwords and unlocking accounts, as well as offer comprehensive management reporting.”

This poses a problem because, as Adrian Gropper, MD, points out “Proprietary identity systems risk being coercive of the patient to the extent that they allow aggregation of a patient’s records across multiple institutions without informed patient consent. Voluntary ID systems can be created that are not coercive while still offering the value of global uniqueness.”

OCR Could Include Cloud Provision in Forthcoming Omnibus HIPAA Rule

The quotes below are from an article written by Alex Ruoff in the Bloomberg Health IT Law and Industry Report.

“Deborah Peel, founder of Patient Privacy Rights, said few providers understand how HIPAA rules apply to cloud computing. This is a growing concern among consumer groups, she said, as small health practices are turning to cloud computing to manage their electronic health information. Cloud computing solutions are seen as ideal for small health practices as they do not require additional staff to manage information systems, Peel said.
Cloud computing for health care requires the storage of protected health information in the cloud—a shared electronic environment—typically managed outside the health care organization accessing or generating the data (see previous article).
Little is known about the security of data managed by cloud service providers, Nicolas Terry, co-director of the Hall Center for Law and Health at Indiana University, said. Many privacy advocates are concerned that cloud storage, because it often stores information on the internet, is not properly secured, Terry said. He pointed to the April 17 agreement between Phoenix Cardiac Surgery and HHS in which the surgery practice agreed to pay $100,000 to settle allegations it violated HIPAA Security Rules (see previous article).
Phoenix was using a cloud-based application to maintain protected health information that was available on the internet and had no privacy and security controls.

Demands for Guidance

Peel’s group, in the Dec. 19 letter, called for guidance “that highlights the lessons learned from the Phoenix Cardiac Surgery case while making clear that HIPAA does not prevent providers from moving to the cloud.”

Peel’s letter asked for:
• technical safeguards for cloud computing solutions, such as risk assessments of and auditing controls for cloud-based health information technologies;
• security standards that establish the use and disclosure of individually identifiable information stored on clouds; and
• requirements for cloud solution providers and covered entities to enter into a business associate agreement outlining the terms of use for health information managed by the cloud provider.”

Putting Data In The Cloud? Retain Control

At the beginning of Stanley Kubrick’s epic, “2001: A Space Odyssey,” apes benefit from the use of technology, in the form of a club. By the end of the movie, however, humans are threatened by the technology used to help them survive in the stars, the artificial intelligence HAL.

In some ways, this technological arc — from tool to master — is an apt allegory for companies entering the cloud, Davi Ottenheimer, president of security consultancy Flying Penguin, plans to argue in his presentation at the B-Sides Security conference in Las Vegas next week. Firms seeking greater efficiency and more features may rely on the technology of a cloud provider, leaving themselves vulnerable to a single security incident.

In his presentation, Ottenheimer plans to draw illustrate the need a more secure approach to clouds using the themes from “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

“The central question for companies is, ‘Do you have control?’” Ottenheimer says. “The fight between the humans and HAL in a nutshell is the fight between the customers and the cloud provider. Humans reliance on the tools to survive in space is almost their undoing, and reliance on cloud services can similarly be a firm’s undoing.”

Healthcare moving to Cloud Computing

Joe Conn looks more deeply into the problems of ‘cloud’ computing for the storage, exchange, and analysis of health data. See his article in Modern Healthcare: ‘Healthcare is slow to change’ to cloud environment

Today there is not yet a trusted organization to certify the privacy of electronic health records systems, whether on servers or in clouds.

Until the privacy of health data can be assured first with trusted security certification and then with a separate stringent privacy certification (proving that patients control the use and disclosure of their sensitive records) Americans will not trust that their data is safe.

Proof that consumers control personal data in clouds will be essential for trust in health IT.

So far all we have are promises of security and privacy. We won’t trust without verification .