Bill O’Reilly is REALLY worried about the loss of his personal medical privacy…

So much so that he repeatedly returned to the topic while debating health care reform last night.

See Editorial with Video

68% of Americans share his fears and “Have Little Confidence that Electronic Health Records Will Remain Confidential” (see: Past Meetings: 7/21/09, slide #3 of the “Privacy and Security Work Group: Recommendations” presentation on the HIT Standards Committee website at: http://healthit.hhs.gov/portal/server.ptopen=512&objID=1271&parentname=CommunityPage&parentid=2&mode=2&in_hi_userid=10741&cached=true

O’Reilly debated with a doctor who doesn’t seem to know that we have no control over our personal electronic health records, the massive damage that already causes, and how much more we will all be harmed if the Administration does not stop health IT systems from violating our privacy. Patient control over personal health information must be built into every electronic system up front.

Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians, and the majority of Amercians REALLY care about health privacy. The national concensus is that we should control who sees our health records; which has been our legal and ethical right since the nation’s founding. Restoring the right to control PHI in electronic health systems will quell fears that the majority has have about electronic systems.

Quotes from the story:

• O’Reilly demonstrated his primary fear – almost panic – over the assumption that his medical records may not be private any more if President Obama passes some version of his healthcare bill. But enough with the foreplay — O’Reilly dived right into his main fear. “My health records which are now in the hands of my private physician . . . they’re gonna be in Washington, right, so every malady that I have is gonna be seen by people in Washington. I don’t want that, do you want that?”

• After a little back and forth on the issue, O’Reilly repeated, “On a computer disk in D.C. will be what’s wrong with me . . . based on my medical history. It makes me very, very nervous.” Yes, we noticed.

• O’Reilly, again, focused worriedly on the privacy issue. “Let me ask you this,” O’Reilly posited. “It worries me that my medical history and your medical history is now gonna be on a disk in Washington, D.C., rather than the confidentiality of a doctor-patient, which we have had in this country for decades – that’s gone.”

• “The data is going to go to a bank in Washington, D.C.,” O’Reilly fretted. “ . . . I’m talking about you, Dr. Marc Lemont Hill, having a condition . . . with his program, it goes to D.C. and the bureaucracy decides how to treat you, not your physician. Doesn’t that worry you?”

• “So you don’t mind having your condition – whatever it may be – leave your doctor’s office and go to D.C. . . ,” O’Reilly said.

• O’Reilly hammered the privacy issue, once again, saying, “It’s going to a database that can be accessed . . . okay, if you don’t mind it, I do, and that’s a big concern of mine. We don’t have any privacy as it is in this country . . . .”

• Hill pointed out the bigger issue than the privacy of medical records (to most Americans, but not to O’Reilly) is 50 million uninsured Americans – and said that President Obama addressed that in the press conference.

• But the biggest question of all – what’s O’Reilly’s medical condition? The one O’Reilly is terrified might fall into the hands of the government? Is it really so awful that O’Reilly (not usually one to worry about privacy) is willing to kill health care reform just to protect it?

But privacy is ALREADY gone!

Refer to Wall Street Journal article: Is Government Health Care Constitutional?

The authors fear that Americans’ health privacy rights will be eliminated by health reform if a proposed “public plan” evolves into “single payer”.

They are too late, there is no privacy (the right to control personal information) in the US electronic health system —EXCEPT for the strong new rights Congress added to the stimulus bill: the ban on sales of PHI, the right to segment sensitive records, and the right to limit disclosure of PHI to health plans for payment or HCO if treatment is paid for out-of-pocket.

Our strong existing ethical and legal privacy rights (a powerful national consensus arrived at over 200+ years) are being totally ignored by federal and state government and industry.

The authors clearly don’t know that we have no health privacy today or that privacy advocates in the bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy (representing 10 million Americans) work to restore those rights.

In 2002, amendments to the HIPAA regulations granted new rights to corporations and government to use ALL health data without informed consent for purposes no one would ever agree to AND eliminated Americans’ rights to give consent before our data is used. See:HIPAA_Intent_Vs_Reality . In 1999, the HIPAA statute granted law enforcement unfettered access to all electronic health records without informed consent or any judicial process.

Both Democratic and Republican Administrations and Congress have contributed to eliminating patients’ rights to control personal health information. The ONC-Coordinated Federal Health IT Strategic Plan: 2008-2012, requires all EHRs to be “wired” for data mining and requires every citizen to have an EHR by 2014.
See:HITStrategicPlan08.pdf

The Federal Strategic Plan grants “back door” access to the nation’s electronic records to government agencies; to the for-profit research industry for P4P, QI, population health, genetic research (personalized medicine), etc; and to the insurance industry to detect fraud (this is one of the most offensive and discriminatory measures planned–the last people patients want to have MORE access to sensitive health records are insurers and employers).

Key Quotes:

• The Supreme Court created the right to privacy in the 1960s

• the justices posited a constitutionally mandated zone of personal privacy that must remain free of government regulation, except in the most exceptional circumstances.

• Taking key decisions away from patient and physician, or otherwise limiting their available choices, will render any new system constitutionally vulnerable.

• if over time, as many critics fear, a “public option” health insurance plan turns into what amounts to a single-payer system, the constitutional issues regarding treatment and reimbursement decisions will be manifold. The same will be true of a quasi-private system where the government claims a large role in defining acceptable health-insurance coverage and treatments. There will be all sorts of “undue burdens” on the rights of patients to receive the care they may want. Then the litigation will begin.

• In crafting the law, however, its White House and congressional sponsors must keep privacy — that near absolute right to personal autonomy they have so often praised and promoted — squarely before them. The only thing that is certain today is that the courts, and not Congress, will have the last word.

The authors tilt at the wrong windmill –not realizing they are too late: the privacy for health data in electronic systems is already GONE. We hope they will join us and work to RESTORE Americans’ longstanding ethical and legal rights to health privacy–regardless of a “public plan” or whether it turns into “single payer”.

HIMSS & Who is Promoting HIT in Stimulus Spending?

This story tells how HIMSS and Harvard’s Blackford Middleton promoted spending billions on health IT in the stimulus bill.

HIMSS and Blackford believe that health technology will be the silver bullet that enables healthcare reform and kills/slows higher costs. That may be possible, but is highly doubtful because the billions are such a bonanza for the health IT industry.

Will this be yet another example of the stimulus billions being used to prop up large corporations, but not to save individual patients who are sick?

Not only does most of health IT vendor industry NOT care about whether healthcare reform succeeds or not, they actively fought to weaken Americans’ rights to privacy and security. By law, industry cares about maximizing revenue, not treating the sick.

So the BIG question is: will the government require all electronic health records systems to have the tough privacy and security measures the public expects and needs to trust these systems? Will the government require electonic health systems to build in our legal and ethical rights to privacy up front?

Most of the HIT industry lobbied to sell the same old dinosaur products and against privacy. The incumbents are very powerful and not interested in change OR IN OUR PRIVACY RIGHTS.

Privacy concerns mount amid the ‘microchipping of America': Businesses seek patents on more applications for RFID

RFID chips are being used more and more in health care. Today the main use proposed is to track whether you receive “authentic” or “fake” medications. The US pharmaceutical industry wants to track whether or not we take and refill brand-name medications. But this is a huge intrusion into the relationship we have with our doctors. If you don’t want to take a medication for whatever reason: side-effects, costs, fears, feeling it does not work, etc——the person to discuss this with is your doctor, not a drug company! There are many valid reasons to change or stop medications. The only people qualified to decide whether you should stay on a particular medication or not are you and your doctor.