Re: The Internet is a surveillance state

In response to the CNN article by Bruce Schneier: The Internet is a surveillance state

Bruce Schneier is wrong. Privacy is not over — the public is just now learning how invasive Internet technology, tech corporations, and government really are, and that they ACT to protect and maintain the US surveillance economy. When enough citizens tell Congress and the President to stop, this privacy disaster will stop.

The public is just beginning to WAKE UP. Today is the start of privacy in the Digital Age in the US, not the end.

It’s a lie that people happily give up privacy for “targeted ads” — tech giants like Google, Facebook, etc. have PREVENTED us from having apps and tools that enable privacy (ie, our right TO control personal information online). We have NO choices because government and the data mining industry have prevented us from having meaningful choices.

Signs of intelligent life in the Universe:

  • Attend or watch the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy (its free). The EU Data Protection Supervisor will keynote and so will the US Chief Technology Officer—-the stark differences between US and EU data protections will be discussed—register at: http://www.healthprivacysummit.org/d/vcq3vz/4W
  • SnapChat—millions of free downloads of an app that shows people want technology that gives THEM control over their data: single use of info (a picture in this case) and the ability to delete info. See: http://patientprivacyrights.org/2013/02/snapchat-and-the-erasable-future-of-social-media/
  • A recent Pew Research Center study found smartphone users are taking action to protect their privacy:
  • The default for Microsoft’s Windows 8 browser is ‘Do Not Track’
    • Microsoft’s Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch said a recent company study of computer users in the United States and Europe concluded that 75 percent wanted Microsoft to turn on the Do Not Track mechanism. “Consumers want and expect strong privacy protection to be built into Microsoft products and services.”
    • See more in the New York Times article: Do Not Track? Advertisers Say ‘Don’t Tread on Us’

DONATE to help Latanya Sweeney and Patient Privacy Rights build a health data map—-we MUST prove that thousands of hidden data users are stealing, using , and selling our personal health data: http://patientprivacyrights.org/donate/

SEE Latanya describe thedataMap at: http://patientprivacyrights.org/thedatamap/
This is the beginning of privacy, the war has just begun.

Re: Celebrity Credit Reports and more, hacked

Multiple celebrities have had their personal information hacked and posted online recently, and this is nothing new. We’ve seen breaches of health information of celebrities in the past, and this will continue to happen, even when privacy and security is a top priority as it is in financial institutions and credit bureaus.

It is critical that privacy be the foundation in Health IT, or Americans’ health information will be the most valuable and available information on the market.

From the Fast Company Article: Michelle Obama’s Credit Report Hacked

“Three of the major credit agencies were hacked and information about Michelle Obama, Beyonce and numerous other celebrities has been leaked on an unnamed website, gossip site TMZ first reported on Tuesday.

Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax confirmed to Bloomberg News that they had found cases where information had been accessed unlawfully by hackers.”

Google Concedes That Drive-By Prying Violated Privacy

SAN FRANCISCO — Google on Tuesday acknowledged to state officials that it had violated people’s privacy during its Street View mapping project when it casually scooped up passwords, e-mail and other personal information from unsuspecting computer users.

In agreeing to settle a case brought by 38 states involving the project, the search company for the first time is required to aggressively police its own employees on privacy issues and to explicitly tell the public how to fend off privacy violations like this one.

While the settlement also included a tiny — for Google — fine of $7 million, privacy advocates and Google critics characterized the overall agreement as a breakthrough for a company they say has become a serial violator of privacy.

Web Site Investigated for Posting Private Data

“WASHINGTON — Law enforcement officials said on Tuesday that they had opened an investigation into a Web site that posted the home addresses, Social Security numbers and other personal information for more than a dozen celebrities and politicians, including Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Michelle Obama and Jay-Z.

“At this point, we are trying to determine the sourcing of this and the validity of the stuff that is being posted,” said a senior federal law enforcement official.

The investigation is being led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Secret Service and the Los Angeles Police Department, law enforcement officials said.”

UPMC, Oracle to help with ID management

To view the article, please visit UPMC, Oracle to help with ID management.

UPMC revealed plans on Thursday to collaborate with Oracle in the development of cloud-based identity management technology to be utilized by small to mid-sized healthcare providers.

According to the article, “CloudConnect Health IT will enable healthcare users to easily manage computer accounts, including adding, modifying and terminating a user’s computer access, officials say. They’ll also help providers manage access based on the user’s job responsibility and provide self-service tools for retrieving forgotten passwords and unlocking accounts, as well as offer comprehensive management reporting.”

This poses a problem because, as Adrian Gropper, MD, points out “Proprietary identity systems risk being coercive of the patient to the extent that they allow aggregation of a patient’s records across multiple institutions without informed patient consent. Voluntary ID systems can be created that are not coercive while still offering the value of global uniqueness.”

Dr. Peel at Authors’ Roundtable at HIMSS 2013

Dr. Deborah Peel, PPR Founder & Chair, will join her co-authors to talk about pressing privacy issues raised in HIMSS’s just released book, Information Privacy in the Evolving Healthcare Environment. As a co-author, Dr. Peel’s contributing chapter discusses patients’ rights to privacy and consent and outlines the auditable criteria of PPR’s Trust Framework, which includes 15 clear principles to ensure meaningful consent within all electronic systems.

Purchase the book here.

Restoring patient control over PHI will be a key topic discussed, with additional focus on the technologies and laws needed to address the gaps and flaws in the Omnibus Privacy Rule.

Date: Tuesday, March 5, 2013
Time: 11:00 AM CT
Where:
HIMSS 2013 Annual Conference and Exhibition
Room 213
New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center
900 Convention Center Boulevard
New Orleans, Louisiana

An advocate for patients’ rights to health privacy since 2004, when she formed PPR, Dr. Peel has led the charge for more stringent data privacy and security protections, as well as tough new enforcement and penalties for violations that were included in the January 2013 release of the Omnibus Privacy Rule.

How the Insurer Knows You Just Stocked Up on Ice Cream and Beer

View the full article at How the Insurer Knows You Just Stocked Up on Ice Cream and Beer.

Your employer already has access to personal medical information such as how often you get check ups and whether you’re taking prescription mediation through your insurance carrier, but now some companies are beginning to monitor where you shop and what you eat.

Some key quotes from the article:

“…But companies also have started scrutinizing employees’ other behavior more discreetly. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina recently began buying spending data on more than 3 million people in its employer group plans. If someone, say, purchases plus-size clothing, the health plan could flag him for potential obesity—and then call or send mailings offering weight-loss solutions.”

“Some critics worry that the methods cross the line between protective and invasive—and could lead to job discrimination. ‘It’s a slippery-slope deal,’ says Dr. Deborah Peel, founder of Patient Privacy Rights, which advocates for medical-data confidentiality. She worries employers could conceivably make other conclusions about people who load up the cart with butter and sugar.”

“Analytics firms and health insurers say they obey medical-privacy regulations, and employers never see the staff’s personal health profiles but only an aggregate picture of their health needs and expected costs. And if the targeted approach feels too intrusive, employees can ask to be placed on the wellness program’s do-not-call list.”

Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior

Picture a box with 2,000 or 10,000 puzzle pieces inside—any one puzzle piece reveals nothing about the picture. But when all the pieces are assembled, an incredibly detailed picture FULL of information is created.

The data mining industry—including Google, Facebook, Acxiom and thousands more unknown corporations and foreign businesses—assembles the puzzle of who we are from thousands of bits of data we leave online. They know FAR MORE than anyone on Earth knows about each of us—more than what our partners, our moms and dads, our best friends, our psychoanalysts, or our children know about us.

The UK study (abstract below) shows how easy it is for hidden data mining companies to intimately know us (and sell) WHO WE ARE.

Most Americans are not aware of the ‘surveillance economy’ or that data miners can easily collect intimate psychological and physical/health profiles of everyone from online data.

The study:

-“demonstrates the degree to which relatively basic digital records of human behavior can be used to automatically and accurately estimate a wide range of personal attributes that people would typically assume to be private”

-“is based on Facebook Likes, a mechanism used by Facebook users to express their positive association with (or “Like”) online content, such as photos, friends’ status updates, Facebook pages of products, sports, musicians, books, restaurants, or popular Web sites”

-correctly discriminates between:

  • -Homosexual and heterosexual men in 88% of cases
  • -African Americans and Caucasian Americans in 95% of cases
  • -Between Democrat and Republican in 85% of cases
  • -For the personality trait “Openness,” prediction accuracy is close to the test–retest accuracy of a standard personality test

The “surveillance economy” is why the US needs FAR STRONGER LAWS at the very least to prevent the hidden collection, use, and sale of health data, including everything about our minds and bodies, unless we give meaningful informed consent.

This urgent topic, ie whether the US should adopt strong data privacy and security protections like the EU—will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy June 5-6 in DC (it’s free to attend and will also be live-streamed). Register at: www.healthprivacysummit.org

2012 Sets New Record for Reported Data Breaches

Please view the full report at 2012 Sets New Record for Reported Data Breaches

Everyone knows that securing data is hard, but in healthcare much is still not even encrypted. 2012 broke the record for the most data breaches.

  • -“With 2,644 incidents recorded through mid-January 2013, 2012 more than doubled the previous highest year on record (2011)”

“The latest information and research conducted by Risk Based Security suggests that organizations in all industries should be on notice that they face a very real threat from security breaches. Whether it is the constantly increasing security threats, ever-evolving IT technologies or limited security resources, data breaches and the costs related to response and mitigation are escalating quickly. Organizations today need timely and accurate analytics in order to better prioritize security spending based on their unique risks.”

Some key statistics:

“The Business sector accounted for 60.6 percent of all 2012 reported incidents, followed by Government (17.9%),Education (12.0%), and Medical (9.5%). The Business sector accounted for 84.7 percent of the number of records exposed, followed by Government (12.6%), Education (1.6%), and Medical (1.1%).”

“76.8% of reported incidents were the result of external agents or activity outside the organization with hacking accounting for 68.2% of incidents and 22.8% of exposed records in 2012. Incidents involving U.S. entities accounted for 40.7% of the incidents reported and 25.0% of the records exposed.”

Rekindling the patient ID debate

Unique patient identifiers pose enormous implications for patient control and privacy. Dr. Deborah Peel is quoted in this article explaining how detrimental UPIs will be for patient trust and safety. To view the full article, please visit Rekindling the patient ID debate.

Key Quotations:

“The idea of unique patient identifiers (UPIs) is not a concept extracted from the next dystopian novel. It could very well be reality in the not-so-distant future. The question remaining, however, is whether or not the benefits of such technology outweigh constitutional privacy and patient trust concerns.”

“Deborah Peel, MD, founder of Patient Privacy Rights, and a fierce opponent of UPIs, writes in a Jan. 23 Wall Street Journalarticle, ‘In the end, cutting out the patient will mean the erosion of patient trust. And the less we trust the system, the more patients will put health and life at risk to protect their privacy.’

Peel points to the present reality of patient health information – genetic tests, claims data and prescription records – already being sold and commercialized. ‘Universal healthcare IDs would only exacerbate such practices,’ she avers.”