Principles for e-Prescribing

Principles for e-Prescribing

The Coalition for Patient Privacy recommends the following basic principles in any e-prescribing legislation:

    include a right to health information privacy (the right to control access to personal health information);

  • require that any prescription data transmitted via e-prescribing be used only for the express purpose of prescription filling and submitting the necessary codes to the insurer for payment;
  • include a provision requiring prompt notification of privacy breaches;
  • include a provision that creates meaningful penalties and enforcement mechanisms for violations detected by patients, advocates and government regulators;
  • include provisions enhancing the security of e-prescription data such as encryption when data is transmitted, stored or retained in any storage and retrieval systems, including access devices, readable cards or other methods;
  • ensure physicians who decline to use e-prescribing are not penalized;
  • ensure transparency by requiring annual reporting to patients listing everyone who has accessed their prescription data;
  • include a provision ensuring stronger state privacy laws are not pre-empted;
  • require reporting of privacy complaints to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS);
  • require CMS to provide an annual report to Congress on privacy complaints made; and
  • ensure prescription technology allows those with disabilities to be able to use e-prescribing tools efficiently and effectively.

Read the Coalition’s letter to Congress here and their press release here.