Usability Failures Heat Up EHR Replacement Market, Black Book Rankings Survey

“According to a recent Black Book Market Research user surveys, the demands of EHR usability can no longer be ignored. 100% of nearly 2,900 practices engaged in the poll report they are employing much stricter selectivity in the replacement market wave and driving more informed decisions as they prepare to swap out original EHR systems.”

To view the full release: Usability Failures Heat Up EHR Replacement Market, Black Book Rankings Survey

Hackers Sell Health Insurance Credentials, Bank Accounts, SSNs and Counterfeit Documents, for over $1,000 Per Dossier

The value of personal health information is very high inside and outside of the US healthcare system. At the same time, the US healthcare industry as a whole does a terrible job of protecting health data security. Most health data holders (hospitals and insurers) put health data security protection dead last on the list for tech upgrades.
Besides the lack of effective, comprehensive data security protections, thousands of low-level employees can snoop in millions of people’s health records in every US hospital using electronic records.

The public expects that only their doctors and staff who are part of their treatment team can access their sensitive health records, but that’s wrong. Any staff members of a hospital or employees of a health IT company who are your neighbors, relatives, or stalkers/abusers can easily snoop in your records.
In Austin, TX the two major city hospital chains each allow thousands of doctors and nurses access to millions of patient records.
All this will get much worse when every state requires our health data to be “exchanged” with thousands more strangers. The new state health information exchanges (HIEs) will make data theft, sale,  and exposure exponentially worse.
Tell every law maker you know: all HIEs should be REQUIRED by law to ask you to agree or OPT-IN before your health data can be shared or disclosed.

Today:

  • -many states do not allow you to ‘opt-out’ of HIE data sharing
  • -most states do not allow you to prevent even very sensitive health data (like psychiatric records) from being exchanged

There is no way to trust electronic health systems or HIEs unless our rights to control who can see and use our electronic health data are restored.

The Office Nurse Now Treats Diabetes, Not Headaches

In response to the escalating costs of healthcare many employers are adding on-site medical clinics to help their employees become healthier—and don’t use employees’ personal health data to penalize them or discriminate against them.

But other large employers, such as CVS, use high costs to justify replacing employees’ health insurance with health savings accounts, imposing involuntary health screenings and wellness programs, and penalizing workers who don’t respond to these simplistic solutions.

Two studies in Health Affairs show that wellness programs don’t work:

  • -“Wellness Incentives In The Workplace: Cost Savings Through Cost Shifting To Unhealthy Workers” See: http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/32/3/468.abstract
  • -“A Hospital System’s Wellness Program Linked To Health Plan Enrollment Cut Hospitalizations But Not Overall Costs”  See: http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/32/3/477.abstract
  • -Rising US healthcare costs are NOT caused by sick people who seek treatment, but by industries that decide what to charge for treatment—including the health insurance industry, the hospital industry, the drug industry, the outpatient surgical center industry, and the lobbying industry.  Industry charges have no real constraints because healthcare is not optional, sick people, employers, and/or government must pay.

Learn about why the US pays sky-high healthcare costs in Time magazine’s March 2013 issue, “Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us”

To view the full article, please visit The Office Nurse Now Treats Diabetes, Not Headaches.

Jonah Goldberg: Civil Libertarians’ Hypocrisy

This insightful piece highlights the drastic violations of our current healthcare system in relation to the recent NSA breach.

Key quote from the article:

“What I have a hard time understanding, however, is how one can get worked up into a near panic about an overreaching national security apparatus while also celebrating other government expansions into our lives, chief among them the hydrahead leviathan of the Affordable Care Act (aka ObamaCare). The 2009 stimulus created a health database that will store all your health records. The Federal Data Services Hub will record everything bureaucrats deem useful, from your incarceration record and immigration status to whether or not you had an abortion or were treated for depression or erectile dysfunction.”

Snowden Took a Job To Leak NSA Secrets? Cool. Let’s Have More Like Him at the DOJ, IRS …

Jul. 2, 2013  Reason.com

Much has been made of Edward Snowden telling the South China Morning Post that he deliberately took a job with Booz Allen to gather up evidence of National Security Agency spying so he could leak it to the world. This makes the international man of government officials’ mysteries even more traitorish to the authority-worshippers who already didn’t like his revealing widespread surveillance by the U.S. For the rest of us, it means he set out to do a thorough job before giving the state a well-deserved kick in the ‘nads. This is a guy who apparently deliberately infiltrated the security apparatus, got hold of its dark secrets, and imposed a little of that “transparency” we’d been promised. We could use a few thousand more like him at the IRS, the Justice Department, the DEA, in the Obamacare bureaucracy, local police forces …

To view the full article please visit Snowden Took a Job To Leak NSA Secrets? Cool.

My Routine – Mark Rothstein, Law Professor

To view the full article, please visit My Routine – Mark Rothstein, Law Professor.

This is a very interesting article about Mark Rothstein’s opinion of current governmental actions involving privacy law. Rothstein asserts, “We live in an age in which consent should not be mistaken for choice. We click through consent on software without even reading it. Even if we technically consented, I doubt very much whether the average person would say, ‘Oh sure, it’s OK for my phone company to accumulate all this data about me.’”

In the interview, Rothstein also comments on the views of Louis D. Brandeis, saying “He felt that the government set the tone for society. If the government doesn’t value privacy and invades people’s privacy, then everybody will do that. He also thought it was very important that government activities be subject to review by the political process and the people.”

What is Snowden’s Impact on Health IT?

To view the full article, please visit What is Snowden’s Impact on Health IT?

This is a highly interesting article about the effect of Edward Snowden’s actions on health IT. In the interview with PPR’s own Dr. Deborah Peel, the issues of privacy that our government is currently facing can also be applied to the healthcare industry. As Dr. Peel aptly states, “The Department of Health and Human Services claims its actions are justified to lower healthcare costs. These are obviously very different agencies collecting different kinds of very sensitive personal information, but both set up hidden, extremely intrusive surveillance systems that violate privacy rights and destroy trust in government.”

A key argument that Dr. Peel makes is “The benefits of technology can be reaped in all sectors of our economy without the harms if we restore/update our laws to assure privacy of personally identifiable information in electronic systems. Our ethics, principles, and fundamental rights should be applied to the uses of technology.”

What is Snowden’s Impact on Health IT?

This article expounds upon the implications of Edward Snowden’s actions for the Health IT industry.

Key quotes:

Deborah Peel, MD, founder of Patient Privacy Rights, says there are many parallels between the Snowden controversy and the U.S. healthcare system.

According to Peel, the NSA has one million people with top security clearance to 300 million people’s data. The U.S. healthcare system has hundreds of millions of people — none with top security clearances, and the majority with inadequate basic training in security or privacy — who can access millions of patients’ most sensitive health records. Further, we don’t know how many millions of employees of BAs, subcontractors, vendors and government agencies have access to the nation’s health data, she added.

“Corporations and their employees that steal or sell Americans’ health data for ‘research’ or ‘public health’ uses or for ‘data analytics’ without patients’ consent or knowledge are rewarded with millions in profits; they don’t have to flee the country to avoid jail or charges of espionage,” she said.

“The NSA justifies its actions using the war on terror,” Peel added. “The Department of Health and Human Services claims its actions are justified to lower healthcare costs. These are obviously very different agencies collecting different kinds of very sensitive personal information, but both set up hidden, extremely intrusive surveillance systems that violate privacy rights and destroy trust in government.”

“The benefits of technology can be reaped in all sectors of our economy without the harms if we restore/update our laws to assure privacy of personally identifiable information in electronic systems. Our ethics, principles, and fundamental rights should be applied to the uses of technology,” Peel says.

Experts tout Blue Button as enabling information exchange between medical provider and patient

Blue Button Plus (BB+) and direct secure email technologies could put patients in control of all use and disclosure of their electronic health records. BB+ lets us ‘view, download, and transmit’ our own health data to physicians, researchers, or anyone we choose.

But state Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) don’t allow patients to control the disclosure of personal health data. Some state HIEs don’t even ask consent; the HIE collects and shares everyone’s health records and no one can opt-out. Most state HIEs ask patients to grant thousands of strangers—employees of hospitals, doctors, pharmacies, labs, data clearinghouses, and health insurers—complete access to their electronic health records.

When corporations, government, and HIEs prevent patients from controlling who sees personal health data– from prescriptions, to DNA, to diagnoses– millions of people every year avoid or delay treatment, or hide information.

HIEs that open the door to even more hidden uses of health data will drive even more patients to avoid treatment, rather than share information that won’t be private.

Health IT systems that harm millions/year must be fixed. Technology can put us in control of our data, achieve the benefits and innovations we expect, and prevent harms.  We have to change US law to require technologies that put patients in control of their electronic health records.

Prince William’s DNA

As more individuals start posting their genomes or other genetic information online, privacy issues grow. A recent article from GenomeWeb about Prince William’s DNA highlights one of PPR’s concerns about publicly sharing such information: one person’s choice to research and reveal information about themselves reveals information about so many others who had no say in that decision.

To be clear, PPR is not opposed to genetic testing and actually believes there are many new and exciting possibilities that exist within the realm of genetic analysis. However, there are several issues that need to be addressed before people start encouraging others to publicly share their own genetic information. This excerpt from the article sums up the dilemma quite nicely:

“What is noteworthy is the ethics of publishing details of this genetic analysis at all,” Brice says, noting that “one of the major ethical concerns about genetic information and privacy” is that individual information can lead to the disclosures about family members.

The Duke’s cousins are free to have genetic tests if they want, but disclosing information about other, non-consenting individuals, is “highly questionable,” Brice says.

To read the full article, click here. (Note: Free subscription may be required).