Texas Election 2014: Abbott Pledges to Safeguard DNA

“Texas gubernatorial frontrunner Greg Abbott recently released an extensive list of items he says he’ll push for once elected.. Ths list includes gun rights, campaign ethics, and blocking implementation of the Affordable Care Act, but the number one item is safeguarding your DNA according to KUT News.”

To view the full article, please visit: Texas Election 2014: Abbott Pledges to Safeguard DNA

Will Texans Own Their DNA?

Will Texans Own Their DNA?

Greg Abbott, candidate for Governor, thinks they should

 

On November 12th, Abbott released his “We the People Plan” for Texas. Clearly he’s heard from Texans who want tough new health data privacy protections.

 

Topping his list are four terrific privacy recommendations for health and genetic data:

  • “Recognize a property right in one’s own DNA.”
  • “Make state agencies, before selling database information, acquire the consent of any individual whose data is to be released.”
  • “Prohibit data resale and anonymous purchasing by third parties.”
  • “Prohibit the use of cross referencing techniques to identify individuals whose data is used as a larger set of information in an online data base.”

 

The Omnibus Privacy Rule operationalized the technology section of the stimulus bill. It also clarified that states can pass data privacy laws that are stronger than HIPAA (which is a very weak floor for data protections).

 

Texans would overwhelmingly support the new state data protection laws Abbott recommends . If elected, hopefully Abbott would also include strong penalties for violations. Contracts don’t enforce themselves. External auditing and proof of trustworthy practices should be required.

 

Is this the beginning of a national trend?  I think so.

 

The more the public learns about today’s health IT systems, the more they will reject health surveillance technologies that steal and sell sensitive personal health data.

Abbott’s Privacy Rights Proposals Draw Attention

“Attorney General Greg Abbott‘s support for more stringent privacy laws is getting some notice, as privacy rights activists say his proposals would lead to more protections for Texans. But concerns tied to the enforcement of the proposed policies are also being raised.”

To view the full article, please visit: Abbott’s Privacy Rights Proposals Draw Attention

 

Abbott’s Privacy Rights Proposals Draw Attention

“Attorney General Greg Abbott‘s support for more stringent privacy laws is getting some notice, as privacy rights activists say his proposals would lead to more protections for Texans. But concerns tied to the enforcement of the proposed policies are also being raised.”

To view the full article, please visit: Abbott’s Privacy Rights Proposals Draw Attention

Court of Appeals hearing case on potential Privacy Rights Suit

New York’s Highest Court is hearing arguments Tuesday on whether or not a patient can sue a Steuben County Clinic for a violation of his privacy rights.

To view the full article, please visit Court of Appeals hearing case on potential Privacy Rights Suit.

Google’s $8.5M Privacy Pact Going To Inapt Orgs, Groups Say

“A coalition of privacy groups [including Patient Privacy Rights] stepped up its opposition to the proposed $8.5 million settlement of a California class action alleging Google Inc. illegally divulged search information, saying Wednesday that counsel has failed to show how the seven organizations chosen to receive cy pres funds are appropriate.”

To view the full article (only available by subscription), please visit Google’s $8.5M Privacy Pact Going To Inapt Orgs, Groups Say.

Prescription drug database bill stalls in Pa. House

To view the full article, please visit: Prescription drug database bill stalls in Pa. House

“A bill that would create a prescription drug database intended to help law enforcement nab doctor-shoppers and pill mills hit a hurdle Wednesday in the state House.”

Five Public Interest Groups Underscore Opposition To Settlement In Google Privacy Suit

“Consumer Watchdog joined the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and three other public interest groups today in re-iterating their opposition to a proposed $8.5 million settlement in a class action suit against Google for privacy violations in the way it handled users’ search data because proposed recipients of settlement funds don’t represent the interests of the class.”

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1529279#ixzz2i1kPTbJt

Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up

“Many technology experts are blaming the software behind Healthcare.gov for all the problems Americans have encountered while trying to sign up for health insurance in accordance with the Affordable Care Act.”

This interesting article explores what is wrong and what is right about healthcare.gov. To view the full article, please visit Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up.

Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

To view the full article, please visit: Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

“…At the HIMSS Media/Healthcare IT News Privacy and Security Forum in Boston, patient privacy advocate Deborah Peel, MD, of Patient Privacy Rights, and UPMC Insurance Services Division Chief AnalyticsOfficer Pamela Peele took the stage to debate the highly-contested issue of whether patients should have full consent over how and with whom their personal health information records are shared.”

Key quotes from Dr. Peel:

“Forty to 50 million people a year do one of three things: avoid or delay diagnosis for critical conditions like cancer, depression and sexually transmitted diseases, or they hide information,” said Peel. “There’s the economic impact of having a system that people don’t trust.”

“He found that only a whopping 1 percent of the public would ever agree to unfettered research use of their data. Even with de-identified data, only 19 percent would agree to the use of their data for research without consent,” said Peel. “On the other hand, when people are asked if they want to participate or have their data used with consent, the public is very altruistic, so we get something very different fuller information, more complete information when the public knows what you’re doing with it and they support the project.”