Dr. Peel on Good Morning America

Dr. Peel was interviewed for Steve Osunsami’s report on the CVS policy requiring employees to report personal health information or pay $50 more per month for coverage. The story appeared on Good Morning America on Wednesday, March 20, 2013.

Watch the video below (uses iFrame). If you can’t see it below, you can check it out on ABCNews.com here.

Dr. Peel on CNN’s OutFront with Erin Burnett

Dr. Peel joined Erin Burnett and Reihan Salam on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 for a discussion on CVS’s new policy that requires workers to report health screenings or pay a $600 yearly surcharge.

Watch the video below (uses Flash). If you’re unable to see it below, you can view it here on CNN.com.

See a transcript of the full segment here.

CVS Presses Workers for Medical Information

Christine McConville with the Boston Herald interviewed Dr. Peel for a recent story on “a new CVS policy that requires workers who use company health insurance to report their weight, and body fat and glucose levels to the insurer — or pay a $600-a-year penalty.”

From the Boston Herald Article “CVS presses workers for medical information”:

“This is an incredibly coercive and invasive thing to ask employees to do,” said Patient Privacy Rights founder Dr. Deborah Peel, adding that mounting health care costs have made these policies increasingly common.

“Rising health care costs are killing the economy, and businesses are terrified,” Peel added. “Now, we’re all in this terrible situation where employers are desperate to get rid of workers who have costly health conditions, like obesity and diabetes.”

Re: Your Online Attention, Bought in an Instant

Natasha Singer unearths more about the instantaneous selling of intimately detailed profiles about Americans in her article in The New York Times: Your Online Attention, Bought in an Instant

Best case: We get more ‘targeted’ ads. We supposedly want personalized ads so badly that we willingly give up deeply intimate portraits about who we are to the hidden data mining industry forever. Really? When did we ever have ANY meaningful choice about who collects and sells our most intimate personal information? See Duhigg’s NYTimes story.

Worst case: Hidden, technology enabled discrimination prevents us from getting jobs and destroys our reputations before anyone will meet with us. Companies like Rubicon literally know more about us than our partners, our mothers or fathers, our best friends, our children or our psychoanalysts. This information is used to harm us—-read Prof Sweeney’s paper on how ads like “YOUR NAME, arrested?” pop up next to the names of African-Americans but NOT next to Anglo-sounding names. What happens when future employers see ads like that when searching for information about you online? Read her paper here.

HELP FIX THIS PRIVACY DISASTER
HELP BUILD a map that tracks all hidden users and sellers of our sensitive health information.
DONATE to the Harvard/Patient Privacy Rights’ research project at: https://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/6402/donate_page/donate-to-thedatamap

European citizens have far stronger protections for their sensitive health and personal data than US citizens.
Learn why and learn about solutions to strengthen US data protections. Register for free to attend the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy June 5-6 in DC: www.healthprivacysummit.org

Re: The Internet is a surveillance state

In response to the CNN article by Bruce Schneier: The Internet is a surveillance state

Bruce Schneier is wrong. Privacy is not over — the public is just now learning how invasive Internet technology, tech corporations, and government really are, and that they ACT to protect and maintain the US surveillance economy. When enough citizens tell Congress and the President to stop, this privacy disaster will stop.

The public is just beginning to WAKE UP. Today is the start of privacy in the Digital Age in the US, not the end.

It’s a lie that people happily give up privacy for “targeted ads” — tech giants like Google, Facebook, etc. have PREVENTED us from having apps and tools that enable privacy (ie, our right TO control personal information online). We have NO choices because government and the data mining industry have prevented us from having meaningful choices.

Signs of intelligent life in the Universe:

  • Attend or watch the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy (its free). The EU Data Protection Supervisor will keynote and so will the US Chief Technology Officer—-the stark differences between US and EU data protections will be discussed—register at: http://www.healthprivacysummit.org/d/vcq3vz/4W
  • SnapChat—millions of free downloads of an app that shows people want technology that gives THEM control over their data: single use of info (a picture in this case) and the ability to delete info. See: http://patientprivacyrights.org/2013/02/snapchat-and-the-erasable-future-of-social-media/
  • A recent Pew Research Center study found smartphone users are taking action to protect their privacy:
  • The default for Microsoft’s Windows 8 browser is ‘Do Not Track’
    • Microsoft’s Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch said a recent company study of computer users in the United States and Europe concluded that 75 percent wanted Microsoft to turn on the Do Not Track mechanism. “Consumers want and expect strong privacy protection to be built into Microsoft products and services.”
    • See more in the New York Times article: Do Not Track? Advertisers Say ‘Don’t Tread on Us’

DONATE to help Latanya Sweeney and Patient Privacy Rights build a health data map—-we MUST prove that thousands of hidden data users are stealing, using , and selling our personal health data: http://patientprivacyrights.org/donate/

SEE Latanya describe thedataMap at: http://patientprivacyrights.org/thedatamap/
This is the beginning of privacy, the war has just begun.

Re: PNAS study on predicting human behavior using digital records

Picture a box with 2,000 or 10,000 puzzle pieces inside—any one puzzle piece reveals nothing about the picture. But when all the pieces are assembled, an incredibly detailed picture FULL of information is created.

The data mining industry—including Google, Facebook, Acxiom and thousands more unknown corporations and foreign businesses—assembles the puzzle of who we are from thousands of bits of data we leave online. They know FAR MORE than anyone on Earth knows about each of us—more than what our partners, our moms and dads, our best friends, our psychoanalysts, or our children know about us.

The UK study shows how easy it is for hidden data mining companies to intimately know us (and sell) WHO WE ARE.

Most Americans are not aware of the ‘surveillance economy’ or that data miners can easily collect intimate psychological and physical/health profiles of everyone from online data.

The study:

  • “demonstrates the degree to which relatively basic digital records of human behavior can be used to automatically and accurately estimate a wide range of personal attributes that people would typically assume to be private”
  • “is based on Facebook Likes, a mechanism used by Facebook users to express their positive association with (or “Like”) online content, such as photos, friends’ status updates, Facebook pages of products, sports, musicians, books, restaurants, or popular Web sites”
  • correctly discriminates between:
    • homosexual and heterosexual men in 88% of cases
    • African Americans and Caucasian Americans in 95% of cases
    • between Democrat and Republican in 85% of cases
    • For the personality trait “Openness,” prediction accuracy is close to the test–retest accuracy of a standard personality test

The “surveillance economy” is why the US needs FAR STRONGER LAWS at the very least to prevent the hidden collection, use, and sale of health data, including everything about our minds and bodies, unless we give meaningful informed consent.

This urgent topic, ie whether the US should adopt strong data privacy and security protections like the EU—will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy June 5-6 in DC (it’s free to attend and will also be live-streamed). Register at: www.healthprivacysummit.org

Re: Celebrity Credit Reports and more, hacked

Multiple celebrities have had their personal information hacked and posted online recently, and this is nothing new. We’ve seen breaches of health information of celebrities in the past, and this will continue to happen, even when privacy and security is a top priority as it is in financial institutions and credit bureaus.

It is critical that privacy be the foundation in Health IT, or Americans’ health information will be the most valuable and available information on the market.

From the Fast Company Article: Michelle Obama’s Credit Report Hacked

“Three of the major credit agencies were hacked and information about Michelle Obama, Beyonce and numerous other celebrities has been leaked on an unnamed website, gossip site TMZ first reported on Tuesday.

Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax confirmed to Bloomberg News that they had found cases where information had been accessed unlawfully by hackers.”

Privacy Piracy Interview with PPR Founder

PRIVACY PIRACY HOST, MARI FRANK, ESQ. INTERVIEWS
DEBORAH PEEL, MARCH 11TH, 2013

On Monday, March 11th, 2013 Deborah C. Peel, MD, founder & chair of Patient Privacy Rights, was interviewed on Privacy Piracy with Mari Frank.

Among the topics of discussion were:

  1. The current state of Health Privacy
  2. How can individuals help to save and strengthen health privacy rights?
  3. What is the focus of the third International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy?

Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

You can read more of the Wall Street Journal debate between Joel R. Reidenberg (Yes) & Thomas H. Davenport (No) here: Should the U.S. Adopt European-Style Data-Privacy Protections?

This urgent issue will be debated at the 3rd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy in Washington, DC on June 5-6, 2013 at Georgetown Law Center.

The opening keynote will be Peter Hustinx, the EU Data Protection Supervisor: A health check on data privacy”

Register to attend at www.healthprivacysummit.org .

HIPAA Omnibus: Gaps In Privacy? — Interview with Deborah C. Peel, MD

Although the HIPAA Omnibus Rule is a step in the right direction for protecting health information, the regulation still leaves large privacy gaps, says patient advocate Deborah Peel, M.D.

HIPAA Omnibus finally affirmed that states can pass laws that are tougher than HIPAA, and that’s really good news because HIPAA is so full of flaws and defects that we are concerned that what is being built and funded will not be trusted by the pubic,” Peel says in an interview with HealthcareInfoSecurity during the 2013 HIMSS Conference.

Listen to this interview and read the full article here.