FTC Files Complaint Against LabMD for Failing to Protect Consumers’ Privacy

The public would be surprised how little thought or money healthcare businesses put into data security.  LabMD is probably just one of thousands of healthcare businesses that don’t encrypt patient data and whose employees who use file-sharing apps to download music, etc, exposing patient records online.

We need new laws that require businesses that hold health data to be audited to prove they protect it.

Shouldn’t businesses have to prove they use tough data security protections before they are allowed to handle sensitive health information?

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2013/08/labmd.shtm

Between Paranoia and Naivete

This op-ed was written by the political editor of the German paper ‘Die Zeit’. He summarizes the historical/cultural perspectives of Germany and the US regarding data protection and rights to control personal information in electronic systems.

He recommends both nation’s approaches should be on the table for discussion to decide “best practices” for data protection.

But he makes some key assertions I disagree with.

He states:

1) A future dictatorship’s use of Facebook would be “the least of your problems”.

  • But actually Facebook spying is very valuable to dictatorships because it reveals contacts and thoughts.

2) Citizens of “liberal societies” are not “experiencing a change in values” and “no longer feel uncomfortable sharing personal even private information”.

  • There is no change in values. Research shows people care just as much as they always have about privacy: ie control over what personal information they share with whom.  People care most about controlling who sees sensitive personal health data—but in the US we have no control.
  • The problem is that privacy/personal control over pii was not built into electronic systems.

3) Re: the Internet as an “emergent system” which “functions so well because it works equally for everybody” and “might cease to offer the greatest benefit for the greatest number”.

  • The Internet has already brought an “advantage to a minority–the rulers”.  He fails to recognize that the Internet is controlled and who controls it now.
  • Lawrence Lessig’s classic book “Code” explains that software and hardware, ie ‘code’ regulates the Internet and determines who controls it.  We must legislate/regulate technology in order to build a cyberspace that supports fundamental democratic rights and values.
  • The NSA/Verizon revelations are proof that a minority in fact control/rule the Internet to the detriment of all; and to the detriment of freedom and our human and civil rights to be “let alone”.

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/29/opinion/between-paranoia-and-naivete.html?_r=0#!

Privacy Advocates Set Their Sights on the Wrong G-Men

In the wake of NSA revelations, key privacy advocates make the point that private corporations and the government are working to ensure total surveillance of all digital information about all 300 million Americans and lock in billions in corporate revenue from the sale of personal data and detailed digital profiles of everyone in the US.

Corporate and government collection, use, and sale of the nation’s personal data is opaque.  The author of the story below trashes several  privacy advocates and misrepresents their key points about the hidden ‘government-industrial complex’.  And he claims that “Individuals can choose not to use a particular social network, search engine or website.”  But individuals have no meaningful choices online. See the documentary: “Terms and Conditions May Apply”.

The lack of trust online and in all holders of personal data is why President Obama proposed the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights (CPBOR). Unfortunately the proposed data privacy protections in the CPBOR do not apply to the most sensitive data of all, health data.

Meanwhile,  the ‘government-industrial complex’ is destroying Americans’ most fundamental rights to privacy. The highest right of civilized man is the right to be ‘let alone’—which happens to be the foundation of Democracy.  Yet all we read about are the wonders of ‘big data’ and the need to collect and use personal data without meaningful informed consent. We can certainly use big data for innovation and benefits—but the public wants to be asked permission for all uses of data, especially for ‘research’ uses. Big data analytics is research.

  • See Westin’s research that shows only 1% of the public approves use of health data for research without consent. See more of his findings here.

Today US citizens have no control over their most sensitive personal information: health data from DNA to prescriptions records to diagnoses—-because privacy-destructive technologies and system architectures prevent us from exercising our rights to give meaningful informed consent before health data is collected, used, disclosed, or sold.

To view the full article, please visit: Privacy Advocates Set Their Sights on the Wrong G-Men

Privacy groups criticize proposed $8.5 million Google settlement

“Five U.S. privacy groups have opposed a proposed $8.5 million settlement with Google in a class action lawsuit over search privacy, as it fails to require Google to change its business practices, they said.”

Read more at: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2047323/privacy-groups-criticize-proposed-85-million-google-settlement.html

The Real, Terrifying Reason Why British Authorities Detained David Miranda

“Last Sunday, David Miranda was detained while changing planes at London Heathrow Airport by British authorities for nine hours under a controversial British law — the maximum time allowable without making an arrest. There has been much made of the fact that he’s the partner of Glenn Greenwald, theGuardian reporter whom Edward Snowden trusted with many of his NSA documents and the most prolific reporter of the surveillance abuses disclosed in those documents. There’s less discussion of what I feel was the real reason for Miranda’s detention. He was ferrying documents between Greenwald and Laura Poitras, a filmmaker and his co-reporter on Snowden and his information. These document were on several USB memory sticks he had with him. He had already carried documents from Greenwald in Rio de Janeiro to Poitras in Berlin, and was on his way back with different documents when he was detained.”

To read more, please visit: http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/08/the-real-terrifying-reason-why-british-authorities-detained-david-miranda/278952/

 

Privacy Groups Seek To Scuttle Google’s $8.5 Million Data-Leakage Settlement

“Google’s attempt to settle a privacy lawsuit by donating $8.5 million to nonprofit groups and schools should be rejected, advocacy groups argue in a letter to U.S. District Court Judge Edward Davila.”

Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/207420/privacy-groups-seek-to-scuttle-googles-85-milli.html#ixzz2eQQGnJNG

How Companies Can Protect Against Leakers

“Ever since Edward Snowden walked out of a National Security Agency facility in May with electronic copies of thousands of classified documents, the finger-pointing has concentrated on government’s security failures. Yet the debacle illustrates the challenge with trusting people in any organization.”

To read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-08-21/how-companies-can-protect-against-leakers.html

Health screening penalties ‘harmful’

Article quoting Dr. Peel: “‘This stuff is harmful, not only because its premise of savings is really weak, but concern about the lack of health privacy causes millions of people to avoid early diagnosis and treatment for cancer, depression and STDs every year,’ said Deborah Peel, an Austin-based physician who founded the nonprofit Patient Privacy Rights Foundation and advocates for tighter confidentiality of health data.”
Read more: http://triblive.com/news/adminpage/4556418-74/health-state-programs#ixzz2eQPdUhit
Follow us: @triblive on Twitter | triblive on Facebook

People Are Changing Their Internet Habits Now That They Know The NSA Is Watching

NSA leaks causing public to mistrust the entire  internet, not just cell phone providers. Quotes:

  • consumer concern about online privacy actually jumped from 48% to 57% between June and July
  • The %  of consumers who adjusted their browser settings and opted out of mobile tracking — jumped 12% and 7% respectively between the first quarter report and July.
  • > 60% of Internet users also reported they do not feel they have control over their personal information online, and 48% said they didn’t know how that information was being used

The lack of personal control over data online will also affect cloud service providers:

  • Cloud-computing industry experts have already estimated that because of the NSA’s surveillance of cloud providers–along with the government’s civil-liberties-trolling methods to get them to comply–more companies will move overseas.
  • ITIF has estimated that this will result in a loss of up to $35 billion for U.S. cloud providers over the next three years, while Forrester analyst James Staten puts the figure at $180 billion.

How will the public react when they find that US health data holders—-such as physicians, hospitals, labs, pharmacies, health data exchanges, insurers, mobile apps, etc, etc— use and sell sensitive personal health data?

To view the full article, please visit:

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3015860/people-are-changing-their-internet-habits-now-that-they-know-the-nsa-is-watching