Google to Sell Users’ Endorsements

The New York Times posted an article reminding us about the permanence of our digital footprints.  Those old posts are never forgotten and can now be used by Google to make a profit.

“Those long-forgotten posts on social networks, from the pasta someone photographed to the rant about her dentist, are forgotten no more. Social networks want to make them easier to find, and in some cases, to show them in ads.  Google on Friday announced that it would soon be able to show users’ names, photos, ratings and comments in ads across the Web, endorsing marketers’ products. Facebook already runs similar endorsement ads.”

“’People expect when they give information, it’s for a single use, the obvious one,’ said Dr. Deborah C. Peel, a psychoanalyst and founder of Patient Privacy Rights, an advocacy group. ‘That’s why the widening of something you place online makes people unhappy. It feels to them like a breach, a boundary violation.’”

“’We set our own boundaries,’” she added. ‘We don’t want them set by the government or Google or Facebook.’”

“Dr. Peel said the rise of new services like Snapchat, which features person-to-person messages that disappear after they are opened, showed how much people wanted more control over how their information was shared.”

To view the full article click here

Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up

“Many technology experts are blaming the software behind Healthcare.gov for all the problems Americans have encountered while trying to sign up for health insurance in accordance with the Affordable Care Act.”

This interesting article explores what is wrong and what is right about healthcare.gov. To view the full article, please visit Why The Experts Are Probably Wrong About The Healthcare.gov Crack-Up.

ONC: Looking for ‘realistic’ ways to account for disclosures

“ONC’s Health IT Policy Committee Tiger Team held a virtual hearing Sept. 30 to gather information about the rule and explore ‘realistic ways to provide patients with greater transparency about the uses and disclosures of their digitized, identifiable information,’ according to a Sept. 23 blog post by Committee Chair Devon McGraw. The Tiger Team asked for answers to specific questions, such as what patients want to know and how transparency technologies currently are being used by covered entities.”

“Deborah Peel, Founder and Chair of the Patient Privacy Rights coalition, suggested in her testimony that accounting for disclosures needs to include all of the detailed information about all uses of a patient’s electronic health information; she added that the rule could be implemented by ‘piggybacking’ onto existing initiatives, such as the Blue Button movement.”

Read more: ONC: Looking for ‘realistic’ ways to account for disclosures – FierceEMR

To read Dr. Peel’s testimony on Accounting for Disclosures click here

Security and Privacy of Patient Data Subject of Regulatory Hearing

Representatives of patients, providers, insurers and tech companies testify before federal panel yesterday at the HIT Policy Privacy & Security Tiger Team Virtual Hearing on Accounting for Disclosures.

“We believe it’s the patient’s right to have digital access that is real-time and online for accounting of disclosures,” said Dr. Deborah Peel, the head of Patient Privacy Rights, a group she founded in 2004. Patients “need and want the data for our own health. We need to have independent agents as advisors, independent decision-making tools, we need independence from the institutions and data holders that currently control our information. We need to have agents that represent us, not the interests of corporations,” she said.

“I think the day will come when people will understand that their health information is the most valuable personal information about them in the digital world and that it’s an asset that should be protected in the same way that they protect and control their financial information online,” Peel said.

To view the full article click Security and Privacy of Patient Data Subject of Regulatory Hearing

To view a PDF of the hearing click HIT Policy Privacy & Security Tiger Team Virtual Hearing on Accounting for Disclosures

 

PPR Submits Comments to Privacy and Security Tiger Team

On Monday, September 30, the Health IT Policy Committee’s Privacy and Security Tiger Team held a Virtual Hearing on Accounting of Disclosures, which is a listing meant to show patients all disclosures of their personal information that are made by a HIPAA-covered entity. On behalf of PPR, Dr. Peel provided written testimony that details the importance of implementing robust AODs, as well as recommendations for quick implementation using existing health IT and meaningful use requirements.

Read the full comments here.

Medical Info for Sale Online

In this article the News4 I-Team discovered how anyone with internet access and who is willing to pay just a few hundred dollars can easily have access to and purchase private medical records online.  This contributes to between “one and two million Americans being affected by medical identity theft each year”.

Read more in this article here and learn where stolen medical information goes, who is selling the information, and where they are getting it from in the first place.  Are YOU at risk?

 

Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

To view the full article, please visit: Patient privacy evangelist, analytics officer spar over data rights

“…At the HIMSS Media/Healthcare IT News Privacy and Security Forum in Boston, patient privacy advocate Deborah Peel, MD, of Patient Privacy Rights, and UPMC Insurance Services Division Chief AnalyticsOfficer Pamela Peele took the stage to debate the highly-contested issue of whether patients should have full consent over how and with whom their personal health information records are shared.”

Key quotes from Dr. Peel:

“Forty to 50 million people a year do one of three things: avoid or delay diagnosis for critical conditions like cancer, depression and sexually transmitted diseases, or they hide information,” said Peel. “There’s the economic impact of having a system that people don’t trust.”

“He found that only a whopping 1 percent of the public would ever agree to unfettered research use of their data. Even with de-identified data, only 19 percent would agree to the use of their data for research without consent,” said Peel. “On the other hand, when people are asked if they want to participate or have their data used with consent, the public is very altruistic, so we get something very different fuller information, more complete information when the public knows what you’re doing with it and they support the project.”

 

Helmet cams raise privacy, liability concerns

“Every time Austin Fire Department Engine 20 rolls toward an emergency call, firefighter Andrzej Micyk straps on a bright yellow helmet to protect himself from heat and falling debris…and a tiny, high-definition video camera that captures…every move — from how he interacts with the public to what he does to gain control of an inferno.”

To view a video the Statesman published with this article, click here

To view the full article click here


Comments from Dr. Peel: “Other major national fire departments ban helmet cams. The Austin TX Fire Dept has no policy about personal helmet cams. The key problem for the public is firefighters often respond to medical emergencies. Should someone with a heart attack or suicide attempt end up on YouTube?”

“This story raises questions about citizens’ rights to health privacy that are similar to the problems that occur when hospital and emergency room employees use cell phones to take pictures of patients.” See recent example: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/woman-sues-hospital-sticker-prank-surgery/story?id=20204405

“In a different context, police cars use video cameras to document encounters with citizens who are potentially breaking the law. In this case, videos serve a very different purpose and protect both citizens and members of the police.”

 

HHS Site Aims To Educate About Health Information Exchange

“On Tuesday, HHS launched a website to help health care providers educate their patients on making informed decisions about health information exchange, The Hill‘s “Healthwatch” reports.”

“Deborah Peel — founder and chair of the not-for-profit Patient Privacy Rights — called HHS’ educational efforts flawed.”

She suggested that HHS instead should have:

  • Mentioned patients’ “fundamental right to health information privacy” in model notices for HIPAA compliance released this week; and
  • Informed patients of their right to a complete list of entities who have accessed their personal health information in electronic health records (FierceHealthIT, 9/17).”

For more information, please visit: HHS Site Aims To Educate About Health Information Exchange

Trust must be mutual for patient engagement to work

“A recent study in the Journal of the American Informatics Association reports that nearly one in eight patients has withheld information from their healthcare providers due to security concerns. Moreover, most of the respondents were very concerned about the security of their information when it was being shared electronically or by fax. Just last week, advocacy organization Patient Privacy Rights sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services urging the agency to improve privacy protections of patients’ electronic health records, particularly in the cloud and in HIEs.”

Read more: Trust must be mutual for patient engagement to work – FierceEMR http://www.fierceemr.com/story/trust-must-be-mutual-patient-engagement-work/2013-09-18#ixzz2fRtzIBsV
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