Consumers Say No to Mobile Apps That Grab Too Much Data

To view the full article, please visit the New York TimesConsumers Say No to Mobile Apps That Grab Too Much Data

Imagine the reactions smart phone users will have when they discover the vast, hidden industry that collects, uses, and sells personal health data—-from prescription records to DNA to diagnoses.

A recent Pew Research Center study found smartphone users are taking action to protect their privacy:

·50% “decided not to install applications on their mobile phones because they demanded too much personal information”

·Nearly a third uninstalled an application after learning that it was collecting personal information “they didn’t wish to share.”

·And one in five turned off location tracking “because they were concerned that other individuals or companies could access that information.”

What will happen when smartphone users want to protect the privacy of their health information and try to turn off:

·the hundreds or thousands of hidden disclosures and uses of their sensitive health records by hospitals’ and doctors’ health IT systems

·the daily sale of their prescription records by pharmacies and lab test results by clinical laboratories

·the disclosure of personal health information via state “health information exchanges” and the Nationwide Health Information Network

If Americans can figure out and ACT to prevent cell phone apps from grabbing their contacts and location information—what will they do when they find out that electronic health systems collect use, and sell mountains of detailed, intimate information about their minds and bodies—and they can’t turn these “apps” off?

People CAN choose to live without Angry Birds (or whatever app they decide against) but they really CAN’T choose to go without healthcare – at least not without possibly serious health repercussions.  People can choose what personal info to share online (to some degree), but really can’t choose what health info is shared.

Health technology systems that eliminate patient control over who can see and use sensitive health data are causing the nation’s greatest hidden privacy disaster. It can only be fixed when the public finds out.

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