EHRs and Patient Privacy- An Oxymoron? Psychiatric Times Cover Story

A recent article in the Psychiatric Times based on the 2nd International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy describes the major problems with EHRs and the consequences of the misuse of this technology. The article quotes both Dr. Peel and Dr. Scott Monteith as well as “Julie” when describing the flaws of EHRs and HIEs. The article is available by subscription only through Psychiatric Times, but here are some highlights and quotes from the article:

“The escalating use of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information exchanges (HIEs) is fraught with unintended and sometimes dire consequences—including medical coding errors and breaches of psychiatric patients’ privacy and confidentiality, according to [Dr. Peel and Dr. Monteith] who scrutinize the field”

“At the recent Second Annual International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy, psychiatrist Scott Monteith, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Family Medicine at Michigan State University and a medical informaticist, relayed the experience of a patient who discovered that her EHR erroneously reported a history of inhalant abuse. In reality, she had a history of  “caffeine intoxication.” After much investigation, the problem was identified. The DSM-IV-TR code (305.90) is used for 4 different diagnoses, including caffeine(Drug information on caffeine) intoxication and inhalant abuse, but the EHR’s printout only made the inhalant abuse diagnosis visible. Although the error was reported to the EHR vendor, the problem persists after almost 2 years.

“‘It is impossible for consumers to weigh the risks and benefits of using health IT and data exchanges when they have no idea where their data flows, who is using it or the purpose of its use,’ wrote Peel, a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst.”

“…Peel emphasized the importance of patients being able to control access to sensitive personal health information. The open source consent technologies, she explained, have been used for more than 12 years by many state mental health departments to exchange sensitive mental health and substance abuse data on some 4 million people in more than 8 states.”

“…’Millions of patients/year refuse to seek treatment when they know they cannot control where their data flows,” she wrote. “Any HIE or EHR that cannot selectively share data with the patient’s meaningful consent, withhold data without consent, AND withhold erroneous data is a failed system or technology. The refusal of certain health IT companies to build technologies that comply with the law and what patients expect shows very poor judgment.'”

If you wish to view the full article by Arline Kaplan and are a subscriber of Psychiatric Times, it can be found at Electronic Health Records and Patient Privacy- An Oxymoron?

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