Health privacy issues can be resolved without obstructing care

See the full article at FierceHealthIT.com

“At times, it seems like concerns about the security and privacy of healthcare data have catapulted into overdrive: For instance, it recently was predicted that healthcare spending on security would hit $70 billion a year by 2015–enough to cover the majority of the uninsured. Sure, there are plenty of security breaches–some of them serious enough to attract public attention. But as a few recent cases show, universal encryption of data (some forms of which may soon be required under the latest HIPAA rules) could eliminate the biggest source of security breaches. Also, with the advent of virtual desktop infrastructure, there’s no reason to store any personal health information on end-user devices…

…Another challenge in the security arena is giving consumers the ability to control who sees their records. While most physicians now have their patients sign HIPAA forms so that they can share data with other providers, the advent of electronic health information exchange (HIE) has greatly increased access to a wide range of individually identifiable data from a variety of sources. And patients may not want everyone who treats them to know, for example, that they have seen a psychiatrist.

A study recently published in Health Affairs documents the extent to which five California healthcare organizations follow principles for protection of patient information that were developed by consumer groups and other stakeholders. Although the healthcare providers took privacy and security seriously, the report said, “none of the organizations did much to educate consumers about the data available about them or to enable them to control their data.””

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