Re: “Web’s Hot New Commodity: Privacy”

In response to the WSJ article: Web’s Hot New Commodity: Privacy

Finally the market for digital privacy is being built! This reflects GROWING public awareness of data theft and misuse.

Yes, PPR will continue to call it “theft”. Data mining corporations are like squatters who sneak onto property and then claim it because the owners didn’t know what they were doing. Data miners are thieves because they know VERY well how hard it is for people to discover what they are doing, and further, they know that there is no way anyone can stop them from stealing personal information. Watch — as ways to protect personal data are developed and laws are proposed to prohibit what they do, they will try to make sure their illegal and unethical practices are “grandfathered in.” These practices must be outlawed in the Digital Age if Americans are to retain the most precious right in a Democracy: the right of law-abiding citizens to be “let alone.”

We must fight back and press Congress to outlaw all data theft and corporate contracts that require giving up control of personal information. We must press Congress to ENFORCE the ban on the sale of health data without consent.

It is now clear to entrepreneurs that people are starting to view personal information as an EXTREMELY valuable asset that many want to have treated as personal property. The fact that the nation’s prescription records were being sold without consent is why Congress banned the sale of protected health information (PHI)—-OUR sensitive electronic health information—without consent in the stimulus bill.

There are many who fear that patients cannot meaningfully give consent to sell their health data; that they will easily sell it for next to nothing and not realize the consequences—such as job loss and generations of job and credit discrimination.

But the current situation is far worse and must be addressed: the huge health data mining industry operates in the shadows. AND we have NO WAY of identifying or preventing data mining corporations from stealing and selling our most sensitive data—from prescriptions to DNA. This secret industry is a behemoth, generating tens to hundreds of billions of dollars in annual revenue.

Letting secret, shadowy corporations continue to make billions/year selling the sensitive personal health data of every person in the U.S. is NOT a fair or sustainable solution to corporate and government data hunger. Why allow any industry built on theft? I can’t think of another legal industry built on theft.

Individuals should control PHI; morally and practically it is the only solution. But we need clear laws and boundaries in addition to individual control (consent), so that there are boundaries around exactly what data can be sold or used.

In Europe most uses of health data are flatly prohibited; in Germany there is no consent, but instead only a handful of uses of health data are permitted—the uses are tightly bounded. This is a very different approach than the US.

We ALSO need a framework of tightly bounded privacy protections for health data (in addition to informed electronic consents) that provides interactive education about consent decisions and sets defaults at the most privacy-protective level.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>