WSJ Exposes Web Tracking Truths

This story should prompt a flood of investigative reporting about the secret, highly lucrative data theft and mining industries. And health information is THE most valuable personal information of all.

“Consumer tracking is the foundation of an online advertising economy that racked up $23 billion in ad spending last year.”

The story shows that the data theft and data mining industries are selling real-time access to specific people—a FAR more intrusive practice than buying a location on a webpage:

“These profiles of individuals, constantly refreshed, are bought and sold on stock-market-like exchanges that have sprung up in the past 18 months.”

“Advertisers once primarily bought ads on specific Web pages—a car ad on a car site. Now, advertisers are paying a premium to follow people around the Internet, wherever they go, with highly specific marketing messages.”

And, of course, sensitive health information is being stolen too:

“On Encyclopaedia Britannica Inc.’s dictionary website Merriam-Webster.com, one tracking file from Healthline Networks Inc., an ad network, scans the page a user is viewing and targets ads related to what it sees there. So, for example, a person looking up depression-related words could see Healthline ads for depression treatments on that page—and on subsequent pages viewed on other sites.”

“Healthline says it doesn’t let advertisers track users around the Internet who have viewed sensitive topics such as HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, eating disorders and impotence. The company does let advertisers track people with bipolar disorder, overactive bladder and anxiety, according to its marketing materials.”

Ubiquitous surveillance and data theft is used to track and discriminate against every American in real time. Ads are NOT innocuous and helpful:

“We’re driving people down different lanes of the highway,” Mr. Cheyney says.

“Some financial companies are starting to use this formula to show entirely different pages to visitors, based on assumptions about their income and education levels.”

“Life-insurance site AccuquoteLife.com, a unit of Byron Udell & Associates Inc., last month tested a system showing visitors it determined to be suburban, college-educated baby-boomers a default policy of $2 million to $3 million, says Accuquote executive Sean Cheyney. A rural, working-class senior citizen might see a default policy for $250,000, he says.”

Only exposure and public outrage over the deeply invasive secret data theft and data mining industries will shut them down. And it’s important to know that the government is one of the biggest customers of these stolen data profiles.

See the Wall Street Journal Article: The Web’s New Gold Mine: Your Secrets

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